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EuroTr@sh

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Everything posted by EuroTr@sh

  1. Hello ALBF me old fruitcake, how you doin'? Is the little man a happy chappy again? "So I can nip down to Lloyds, Superdrug, Boots or HMV the day before leaving and ask for a antigien test (1 adult and 2 kids) FOC." You can book tests with Lloyds pharmacy online. It's not free, it's Β£23 per test or summat like that, results within 15mins or so it says on the website. Not all branches do them but quite a lot seem to. I know this because I have one booked for tomorrow. I have my fingers crossed that it works and by this time tomorrow I will know. Don't even try Boots, their website did my head in last year - it made you pay for the test first before you could book an appointment, so I paid and then couldn't find a Boots within 100 miles of me where I could get a sodding test. Then it logged me out and it took me ages to log back on to get my money back. Lloyds is easy peasy to book and you pay the shop when you turn up.
  2. Well I thought I'd look in again and see if the forum had turned over a new leaf for the new year and become a pleasant, friendly place for banter. Noooooo..... more of the same old, same old. Even the Xmas greetings thread has turned into the usual opinionated outpourings, how ironic is that ! Happy New Year to Noisette. Idun, Gardian and other old-timers that I used to enjoy chatting with in the days when this forum used to be a nice place to visit.
  3. A thread about people who cross the Channel on rubber boat, some of whom are asylum seekers and some of whom are aiming to be illegal immigrants, is to my mind not at all the same thing as a thread about illegal immigrants. A person fleeing terror or whatever, who requests asylum as soon as they cross the border into their destination country, and who is subsequently granted, never was an illegal immigrant. Illegal immigrants are the ones who leg it and disappear into the decor as soon as they land, taking advantage of the UK's lax labour laws and refusal to adopt ID cards which makes it easy for them. Different situations, different issues, different problems needing different solutions. But I agree with Debra, the whole thread has become sickening and I'm out. Same goes for this forum.
  4. I thought the debate was supposed to be about people who cross the Channel in rubber boats. Some of those are asylum seekers, some are illegals. That's one of the problems caised by the lack of secure routes. But if the debate has moved on and is now about illegals only, my bad, I haven't been following it closely.
  5. OK I'm a bit late reading your post, but... methinks you make too many assumptions on all kinds of things. Question, question, question, don't make assumptions that lead to inappropriate comments. Or perhaps you're like Boris, not a details person. For starters, Eurotrash is not even in France. More importantly, have you found the link yet to support your categoric assertion that "Would be asylum seekers are legally bound to apply for asylum in the very first safe nation they reach"? (Because I suspect you were thinking of the Dublin agreement which is simply an agreement between EU member states and as such is no longer relevant to the UK.)
  6. The world according to Ken, all neatly black and white. Anything more complex than black and white is apparently difficult for some, too. https://www.habitatforhumanity.org.uk/blog/2016/09/refugees-asylum-seekers-migrants-crucial-difference/ https://www.amnesty.org/en/what-we-do/refugees-asylum-seekers-and-migrants/ https://www.rescue-uk.org/article/refugee-migrants-asylum-seekers-and-immigrants-whats-difference
  7. Given how hard it is to to prove that something doesn't exist, maybe it would be easier if those who claim that such a law exists, could point us to the text? I wonder if GΓ©rald Darmanin finally managed to get through to Patel last week that the UK simply telling the French to control the UK borders better isn't good enough, the UK has to take ownership of the problem and address it properly. Anyway it appears that Johnson has just had the amazingly bright idea of setting up a group to look into the issue. Would have been good if HMG had thought of doing this a decade or so back, but hey, better late than never. https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/priti-patel-set-oversee-more-25506767
  8. And you believe what you read in the Daily Mail????? The DM is not a newspaper, it's a propaganda rag. It's a mix of fact and fiction and who knows which is which. How hard is it to dress up in a POLICE suit while your mate films you? Further down the same page: "Channel migrants are set to be flown to ALBANIA to a new asylum centre at cost of Β£100,000-a-head a year as French deny agreeing to stop all crossings" Stated as a fact, did you believe it? But Albania has already called it out. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/migrants-flown-albania-asylum-processing-b1931430.html
  9. I thought that might be what they would say. It's like these pigs that UK pig farmers are having to send to the Netherlands for butchering because there is a butcher shortage in England, I think I read that a British pig that has been slaughtered and butchered in the EU and sent back to the UK as pork joints, can't be sold as British pork. Of course it's political, trade agreements are. You gotta πŸ’› Brexit. I guess either you give it a shot on the basis you're very unlikely to be checked, or you could place an order with Leclerc Drive or suchlike on your drive down and pick it up en route. Or even put your order in from Folkestone with Drive in Calais, and load it up as soon as you arrive in France. That way it's sorted.
  10. It's rather an unusual question and one to which quite possibly nobody in expatforumland knows the answer. Not really a situation that Brits living permanently in France are ever likely to have found themselves in, is it. You may even be the very first person to have asked this question! Please come back and share the answer when you have found out, it would be interesting to know. I assume you know about Leclerc Drive? You can order online then go collect your order with virtually no human contact. It's how lots of people preferred to shop in the early days of Covid. Far lower risk there, than in making the journey from the UK to France, I would have thought...
  11. I don't think most people get hot tubs for the same reason they get baths, ie to wash themselves in, do they? Hot tubs (in my experience of other people's) are outside and are for relaxing in the open air and/or social frolicking with your friends. Where I once lived in Wales, the house next door was rented out as a luxury holiday cottage and the hot tub in the back garden was supposed to be one of its "selling points". Often especially on the first day new holidaymakers arrived there was a lot of giggling and squealing coming from the garden on the first evening as took their wine outside to try out the hot tub. It clearly never occurred to them that we could see them through the hedge if we chose to look, because sometimes they frolicked starkers. I can imagine it might be quite a nice experience lying in a hot tub on a dark cold winter's evening sipping a glass of something looking up at the stars, but I doubt I'd want to do it more than once or twice. Another encounter with a hot tub was the manager of a holiday complex where I once worked who set one up outside his onsite accommodation. He was a slob and his hot tub was disgusting because it usually had wine and crisps and bits of soggy pizza floating round in it. Head office came to inspect the site half way through the season and blew a fuse because he hadn't asked permission to put a hot tub in. I think they were going to charge him for the electricity and make him get rid of it, but then he got sacked in any case.
  12. Well I suppose I have reply but frankly I don't know what you are on about. Just so we all agree on what I wrote, it was "I don't think the problem will be solved until the root cause is addressed. As long as people feel disaffected and abandoned by society they will turn to drugs as a way to escape, mentally. And as long as people at the top have too much money and too much power and consider themselves untouchable (I am thinking stock market traders and the like who apparently feel their wits are sharper when they are high on cocaine, and I do wonder how many members of HMG get stoned regularly as well) it will carry on. " Where am I blaming anybody in particular? I am just saying what seems to me obvious. The root cause is that there is a demand at at all levels of society. All drug users contribute to the problem, visibly or not. The public order problems, drug fuelled crime and drug wars and arrests and rioting etc vislble at the bottom end but the drug trade also thrives because it's also financed by those higher up. You and your mates were contributing to drug dealers' profits when you bought your pills. Pop stars and rich kids contribute big time by spending a fortune on designer drugs, plus they also set a role model that tells impressionable teenagers that using drugs is cool. Both these issues need solving. For people who turn to drugs out of boredom or desperation, it is pretty obvious that the solution is to reduce the boredom and desperation. I don't know how you do that but I see that as the most urgent end to tackle because quite apart from the drug issue, there shouldn't be a layer of society that feels it has nothing to live for. At the other end, people who take drugs because it's trendy and makes them buzz and they can afford it and they feel untouchable because they move in circles where it's accepted and even expected, the solution has to be about changing the attitude. And I have no idea how you do that. But, until both those scenarios are changed, I don't see the problem going away. The police will never stamp out the drug trade, for as long as there is still a demand. It is the demand is the root cause.
  13. I don't think I do. Our Drakeford certainly isn't the type, and I don't think Sturgeon is either I can't imagine either of them snorting a line through a rolled up Β£100 note. Johnson and his inner circle, with their Tory donor chums, at their off the record get togethers where backs are scratched and favours are exchanged and suggestions are made and followed up afterwards by self destructing WhatsApp messages, there I can imagine it all too easily. Can't you?
  14. Did you read all my post, or just the bit that gave you an excuse to get on your hobby horse? I am aware that curious teenagers take drugs (it was speed in my day) and that spoilt rich kids and the international movers and shakers of the world also use drugs, it's part of the lifestyle. I wasn't claiming that City traders and potentially the Johnson chumocracy are disaffected and abandonned by society, exactly. These people aren't the level where the problems are apparent, tjhey're not a social problem as long as they keep it under control. They buy their stuff discreetly, not at street corners where rival gangs fight over whose territory it is. That's where the problems are, in the places where people's lives are so crap that drugs are what they live for and they are easy targets for suppliers. No job, no money, no nice surroundings, no self respect and no respect from anybody else, but drugs make them feel better about it. Actually I'm very amused that you called me woke, it's the first time anyone has said that about me and probably the last, because I am far from it. I don't particularly want to see lots of money spent on rehabilitating junkies. But culling humans is not allowed, and society needs to rid itself one way or another.
  15. I don't think the problem will be solved until the root cause is addressed. As long as people feel disaffected and abandoned by society they will turn to drugs as a way to escape, mentally. And as long as people at the top have too much money and too much power and consider themselves untouchable (I am thinking stock market traders and the like who apparently feel their wits are sharper when they are high on cocaine, and I do wonder how many members of HMG get stoned regularly as well) it will carry on.
  16. I really don't think you would have any issues in Wales. England though, ooh I dunno about that. 😁 😁 😁 You still need the day 2 tests you know but you can have lateral flow ones now. I don't see how fishermen could block the tunnel TBH, and I doubt they would bother with Dover - it's not exactly a fishing port is it. You're more likely to find yourself held up by Insulate Britain demonstrators glued to the road I think.
  17. Gluestick wrote "What I have surmised, over the years, is that most of the French, are not to interested in national politics; rather they are more concerned with their Commune, Canton and Departement." This is the truth I think. And it's the same in the UK and everywhere else. What you read in the papers over breakfast makes your blood boil, then you get on with your life and push it to the back of your mind. It's the only way to stay sane. ALBF, it will be interesting to see where you try next and how it works out although I suspect it won't be America because of US immigration policies.
  18. "Do I know more or less than a 25 year old born and breed in France ? Hmmmm ? I had this debate with a 14 year old French girl once many years back. She must be in her 30's now. Any French person living in the UK for 25 years...knows more about the UK than me." That is chop logic. Yes a French person living in the UK for 25 years knows more about the UK than you do. But a person born and bred in the UK, lived their whole life there and still living there, knows infinitely more about the UK than a French person who arrived there as an adult and has lived there for 25 years. I actually think that any person who has lived in more than one country, will never see the country they live in, in exactly the same way as a person who has never lived anywhere else. Their focus may be slightly different (because when you're new in a country, oftgen you have certain experiences that are unique to newcomers, than no native needs to experience or know about), they will see things a little more objectively and be less inclined to take things for granted without questioning them because they have other systems to compare with. I'm not saying that makes their view any more valid or any less valid, just different. "Am I allowed an opinion if I am not French ? Or should I keep quiet and be told when living in France ?" Of course you're allowed an opinion, everybody is allowed an opinion. But I think sometimes you need to make it clear that it is YOUR opinion and that you're aware it is not necessarily the only valid opinion out there. Nobody is asking you to keep quiet, it would be a shame if you did. But equally, you shouldn't tell other people to shut up because you don't want to hear them, which you must admit you do have a tendency to do. It wouldn't hurt if you listened to what other people are saying, and tried to understand why they are saying it. There's nothing wrong with telling them you disagree if you do, or even telling them you think it's tosh. The problem is when you state your opinions as if they were facts and say that it IS tosh. Because to them, it clearly isn't. And they are also entitled to have an opinion.
  19. "I know more about France than most of my French friends and neighbours." Oh come on. That is just plain daft. You may know as much, or possibly more, in theory, than they do about certain things, i.e. the things that happen to interest you or that you happen to have hands-on experience of. You certainly know less than they do about other things and on balance I would be very surprised if you know anywhere near as much overall. They've had a lifetime of dealing with the nuts and bolts of life in France as a French person, whereas your wife has done most of your admin dealings for you. Most of what you 'know" is what you've picked up from your family, filtered through their eyes, not from what you've experienced first hand. To take one tiny detail - URSSAF looms large in the lives of many French people. What have your experiences with URSSAF been like? I'm sorry ALBF, you are a little bit French, even quite a lot French by now, but that is all.
  20. I actually think ALBF has a point, I'm sorry to say. Nobody is saying retired folk are stupid, Sid. But, an expat early retiree's experience of France is going to be different from the experience of the majority of the population and specifically working folk. As you said yourself, you have choices that most people in France don't. You're not affected by most of what's going on in France right now, the economic and social problems etc that plenty of people are directly affected by and many more are concerned about because it's their country and their society. With that in mind, would you not agree that the carefree life you're living and loving as an expat early retiree, is not typical of life in France as lived by most of the French? Right now I'm chilling out and living the good life on a smallholding in Wales. I've read about Rishi Sunak's budget announcements and how they're going to affect the majority of the UK population but it's like news from another planet. I'm pretty sure that it is barely going to affect me, because my situation isn't typical. If alittlebitbritish says to me that I'm not living in the Real UK, I would agree. I do realise how fortunate I am, because I lived most of my working life in the UK (and the latter part of it in France) and so I can empathise with the swathes of UK population who are trying to live decent lives in urban West Yorkshire, South London and all the other places where I've lived and worked, and who are maybe finding things a bit tough right now. So I accept that I'm not living in what we might call the real UK, in exactly the same way that you're not living in what we might call the real France. But I think the issue is, you don't seem to want to acknowledge this. You're loving your life there because of being an expat early retiree, not because France is a bed of roses generally. Which is fine, but what's not fine is to make a comparison between the expat early retiree lifestyle in France and the typical UK urban/suburban/inner city lifestyle, and use it to diss the UK. It would be like me comparing my landed gentry lifestyle in Wales with the typical French urban/surburban/inner city lifetyle and dissing France because it compares badly. Do you see my point? Enjoy your lifestyle, I'm sure you've earned it, but please see your situation in context for what it is, and don't turn it into a France good UK bad thing.
  21. "quasi-humerous" (that's spelled wrong by the way, it shouldn't have an 'o' in it) - Were you thinking of the collarbone, or the shoulder? πŸ˜‡ every forum needs its resident pedant...
  22. You'd probably be safe with the turkey Gardian. I don't think the UK has got its act together on border checks yet. I brought fresh meat back from France to the UK a couple of weeks ago, no questions asked.
  23. On this, I would say that neither is right and neither is wrong. The stupidity is that each of them seems to think that what is right for them, must be right for everybody. Although in this case since the bloke has no experience of living in France, he shouldn't be talking about what living in France is like in the first place. Me, I seem to be in a phase of yo-yo-ing back and forth. I lived last year in the UK, I lived this year in France, and next year who knows. I love them both in different ways and for different reasons, I am happy in both places but equally I can see things wrong with both places and there are things about both places that get on my wires. I certainly don't get any Schadenfreude from looking across to the UK from France and seeing problems. Why would I, one person's problems don't make my life better. I find it very unattractive when people seem only able to measure their success by another country's/person's failure, and unfortunately there was a lot of this in UK media during Brexit, people seemed more gleeful at the prospect of Brexit doing damage to the EU than the prospect of Brexit being good for the UK. Let's not turn it round now, and big up France because of problems in the UK. Success shouldn't be about how well you are doing relative to the rest, it is about how well you are doing in absolute terms. If one kid gets 4 out of 10 in a maths test, the fact that nobody else got more than 2 out of ten does not mean that the first kid did well; any more than if he gets eight out of ten and everybody else gets nine or ten, that means he did badly. The best way for everyone to climb higher is by helping each other and giving each other a leg up when you can, not by trampling on everyone else and trying to kick them down to the bottom.
  24. Do you always see everything in blackest of black or the whitest of white, with no shades in between, or are you just going through a tetchy patch right now that's making you irrational? Just because a thing isn't perfect, doesn't mean it is awful. Britain is not utopia. France is not utopia. Nowhere is utopia. Sensible people recognise this and choose the non-utopia that they feel the closest affinity with, that best suits them, their needs, their cultural outlook, their emotional preferences. If there are a lot of things about a country that you love, you will forgive it many faults. Like people. Would you never choose a partner if you could not find a perfect person with no faults at all? May also be pointing out that France and Britain are not the only two countries in the world to which one can move?
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