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Now?


Chancer

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My question regards the many ways of expressing the present and near future now (as opposed to what has happened before).

In my early days i asked and was told à partir de maintenant but I hear it expressed many other ways, or at least I think I do!

1. Dorenavant.

2. Or

3. Desormais

4. Au dela

And my stable -

5. à partir de maintenant.

Can someone please give me examples of where one (or more) would be used and another (others) not

Je vous remercie en avance [:)]

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1. Dorenavant.

from now on.....henceforth

2. Or

now 

or donc...................... thus / therefore

3. Desormais

in future.........................henceforth..................from now on

4. Au dela

l'au dela ....................the beyond

And my stable -

5. à partir de maintenant.

from now on

A quick look in Collins Robert found the above translations

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A few observations with thoughts about etymology, and musical examples.

Notice how you can sing 'dorénavant' to 'from this moment on' and 'from now on' to 'désormais'

dorénavant

Old French    d'or en avant   (from now to the future).

From this moment on

désormais

From dès

+ or +

mais (from now  but)

From now on

Désormais

Au delà

from au de là (after that point)

hereafter,  henceforth,  beyond a certain point

L’au-delà  (the hearafter as in 'after death)

Au delà de la terre

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Thank you for your responses even if they were repeated.

Thats really frightening that it was only a few months ago, not only did the learning not stick which is not unusual and I often have to learn a phrase or a meaning several times but I cant recall asking the question before!

I put it down to my new tee-totalness [:D]

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You've lost your bet, Norman.  How could anyone NOT click on the music links?

For what it's worth, the only context in which I know delà is as in Messiaen's Eclairs sur l'au delà.

Here is a clip:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LcCtMpQlLk&feature=youtube_gdata

I was at Rattle's concert a few years ago when this was played as part of the Proms season.  First time I'd really listened to Messiaen and I was so glad I couldn't get tickets for anything else as I only had a choice of about three evenings.

Edit:  sorry, everyone, will try pasting the link again:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LcCtMpQlLk&feature=youtube_gdata

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No a group of scaphandriers, it may actually have been palanquer thats the problem when you hear words.

Anyway palanque for a stockade will be my first new word for today, whats with the NF, norme français? Editted Noun Feminine [I]

I assume that you are referring to a fortified defensive structure and not a salle de police or is it the term used for an enclosure of palissade?

The more French I learn the more I realise how much is missing from even the larges dictionaries.

I watched the film Casino with Jo Pecchi, Robert DeNiro and Sharon Stone on French tv the other night, that really was an education in itself for compound gros gros mots [:)]

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[quote user="sweet 17"]

You've lost your bet, Norman.  How could anyone NOT click on the music links?

For what it's worth, the only context in which I know delà is as in Messiaen's Eclairs sur l'au delà.

Here is a clip:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LcCtMpQlLk&feature=youtube_gdata

I was at Rattle's concert a few years ago when this was played as part of the Proms season.  First time I'd really listened to Messiaen and I was so glad I couldn't get tickets for anything else as I only had a choice of about three evenings.

Edit:  sorry, everyone, will try pasting the link again:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LcCtMpQlLk&feature=youtube_gdata

[/quote]

Jealous of that! He is one of those composers like Stravinsky who is so much more magical heard live...

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