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The Great French Paint Rip-Off Scam


Matelot
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Gluestick,

 You said ...."New pine shutters (BricoDepot, trimmed to absolute size); these we treated with a Leyland stain/preservative as we wanted to achieve  the local colour ambience: cream/yellow tinged masonry, dark stain shutters, similar to Sadlins."

Did your French neighbours use Leyland products then? What is Sadlins?... do you mean Sadolin?

Have you no comment on my last posting re. Pliolite and Johnstones paints? (Like, I'm right!!!)

For emerging resin use knotting compound and for rough end grain use enduit, followed by one coat undercoat and two coats topcoat.

If you want technical data suggest you check the relevant websites, we're too busy decorating to have all the tech. data to hand!

Are you a spray painter? ( because of your references to metal, paint etc.) I ask because my OH is a specialist spray painter, but knows b----r all about decorating.

I want you to know this is all in the spirit of a bl---y good debate, nothing personal.

Have fun with the shutters,

Aly

 

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Gluestick,

 You said ...."New pine shutters (BricoDepot, trimmed to absolute size); these we treated with a Leyland stain/preservative as we wanted to achieve  the local colour ambience: cream/yellow tinged masonry, dark stain shutters, similar to Sadlins."

Did your French neighbours use Leyland products then? What is Sadlins?... do you mean Sadolin?

Pliolite based masonry apints are available in France ass well.

Have you no comment on my last posting re. Pliolite and Johnstones paints? (Like, I'm right!!!)

For emergnig resin use knotting compound and for rough end grain use enduit, followed by one coat undercoat and two coats topcoat.

If you want technical data suggest you check the relevant websites, we're too busy decorating to have all the tech. data to hand!

Are you a spray painter? ( because of your references to metal, paint etc.) I ask because my OH is a specialist spray painter, but knows b----r all about decorating.

I want you to know this is all in the spirit of a bl---y good debate, nothing personal.

Have fun with the shutters,

Aly

 

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Aly:

Not in order: too much to do tonight!

French neighbours: sorry, what's that to do with price of sausages in Glasgow?

I checked locally and in various cats: decent wood stain/preservative in France was horrendously expensive compared with the trade price I obtained from Leyland.

As I explained previously, didn't have the luxury of time to spend using knotting; rubbing down; undercoating; top coating etc.

Of course, I could have left them to the mercy of the wind and rain until next trip.....................

I still seek not necessarily "Tech Data" but rationale.

I am interested and concerned with two aspects: price and performance.

Johnstones Paints: now sold in Leyland and their (Leyland) PR release stated they (Leyland) had bought them (Johnstones). The local branch I use goes under the name of Leyland: I must thereofr presume it's owned by Leyland. Yes, my last invoice states another company owns Leyland. Wonderful!

Does the paint work? Yes. Is it a keen price? Yes. End.

Pliolite: right about what? Is it breathable? Yes, apparently.

Do the walls now look nice? Yes?

Will it last?

Tell you in ten years!!

Spray Painting. I used to run a pretty busy paint and panel shop, many years ago and we specialised in innovative finishes for race and competition cars. Specialists in metallic finishes well before two pack and levellers came into being.

High performance and competition cars meant dealing with a whole range of different body and chassis materials, including, mild steel, alluminium alloys, fiberglass, hot moulder marine ply (Marcos), forerunners to carbon fibres and then all sorts of non-ferrous metals too (Chassis/suspension components).

 However, I was also involved in various metal finishes, including powder coating; enamel baking; plastic coating; plating; etc. which all taught me how critical surface preparation was.

Decorating I found far easier, since the variety of materials and range of potential finishes was far less. However, the principles were very much the same. As with marine and aircraft.

In any case, I am still interested to get to the bottom of the how and why of French finishes and materials in order to understand the basics of difference.

That's all! [:D]

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[quote user="Charlotte3"]

Sorry Gluestick, I'm bored now.

[/quote]

So was I some time ago.....................

I was merely being polite.........sigh [:(]

Still perhaps someday, someone out there in the big cyberland of French fora will answer my questions on the actual reasons, rather than the accepted custom and precedent.

I'm not holding my breath, mind! [blink]

 

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I don't know if this is relevant i've only just skimmed through two

pages of dialogue on paints, prices and their origins but I recently

ordered 5 x 20 litres of matt emulsion from Screwfix which was the most

keenly priced after doing quite a lot of research. When it arrived it

is Johnstones.  Have taken it all to France but yet to use so we

shall see.

Kernow

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At the end of the day, in the UK, there are only a small number of firms still making paint.

The smaller family outfits in the main seem to have packed up shop, often due to new emission regulations and more stringent Health and Safety etc.

Stands to reason, therefore, that a huge trade buyer like Screwfix can only source the stuff through a limited number of suppliers: often with an "Own name" label.

Still rest easy Kernow, Johnstones has always been excellent trade paint, in my own small experience.

Whether you should be using it to paint your French house is another matter.......................

 

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With Screwfix unless they quote the suppliers name dont assume that it will be the same next time, to date I have bought gun-grade foam from them made by 3 or more differnt suppliers, each one performed succesively worst than the last.

I think if they list something and it does well the next task is where can we buy it cheaper.

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Ford Anglia,

Lime based plaster question:     It's actually the same thing, assuming you mean polyurethane paint (not varnish). Don't thin too much though, just enough to make the paint workable. If you have had flaking don't forget to fill and sand down first. When you are finished the above DO NOT SAND DOWN or you will break the seal. The thing with lime based finishes is to seal them in completely so the lime can't get out!

Gloss paint:    Try to avoid gloss finishes outside because the weather here (though apparently not in the Pas de Calais) will take out the gloss and leave you with a tired, flaky finish in no time.

Masonry paint:   Always use a primer on new surfaces. Again, there could be lime present so seal it in and paint over with at least two coats of masonry paint. (If your BBQ is in a subterranean tunnel, apparently you could use Leyland pliolite based masonry paint to great effect LOL)

Good luck, nice to know you're all getting the spring decorating bug....maybe summer isn't too far away when we can all relax and enjoy the results of our endeavors!

Aly

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