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Why ?


Bugsy

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   I dont need the BBC to tell me its windy in Dorset today................my fence panels are down .post  snapped off  !  Still blowing  hard ....Wheeley  bins  emptied this morning are moving  down the road !

Radio Solent  announced Isle of Wight ferries now stopped running  so those who came over to work this morning  may be here overnight if the wind does not drop !

 

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[quote user="Bugsy"]Do BBC news reporters feel that they have to stand outside in the wind and rain to tell us that its windy and raining ?

[/quote]

 

Just to reinforce the fact that we are all going to hell in a handcart...............As is all the other BBC news

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I find this quite annoying....not just the weather, but pretty much any news story now.

"Good evening, here is the news..... Some chap was murdered today in a small town. Here is Andy McWindswept, our correspondent, live from the scene...."

"Good evening, I am standing outside an anonymous house with a policeman standing at the front door. I can confirm that some chap was murdered. I will fill time by repeating the same few facts several times while standing in the rain. I will then go to my expense-account hotel and the camera crew and myself will have a nice meal. Back to you in the studio....."

[:@]

The only time a reporter is needed on the scene is if there is an erupting volcano or some other visually interesting story.

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[quote user="dave21478"]I find this quite annoying....not just the weather, but pretty much any news story now.

"Good evening, here is the news..... Some chap was murdered today in a small town. Here is Andy McWindswept, our correspondent, live from the scene...."

"Good evening, I am standing outside an anonymous house with a policeman standing at the front door. I can confirm that some chap was murdered. I will fill time by repeating the same few facts several times while standing in the rain. I will then go to my expense-account hotel and the camera crew and myself will have a nice meal. Back to you in the studio....."

[:@]

The only time a reporter is needed on the scene is if there is an erupting volcano or some other visually interesting story.

[/quote]

I absolutely agree. This practice really winds me up.

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Whilst I do understand the irritation about paying some weather guy to tell us what we already know, I wonder what would happen if no reporter ever went to the scene of a story to check up on the facts? Are we perhaps becoming a little blase about the news because so much of it seems to be provided by amateurs with modern cellphones and vox-pop reports from the "man in the street"?  It seems daft in a way, but without genuine reporters spending time getting to the bottom of things, I'm not at all convinced we'd be better off. 

If the Storyville documentary about the New York Times comes back on BBC4 - give it a look.  A fascinating insight into the way amateur news coverage can be an enemy to the truth.  Riveting and apposite.

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I was begining to feel sorry  for the woman ordered to stand outside Papworth Hospital all day to report on every news broadcast who had come and gone to see the Duke Edinborough .  We all knew the proceedure carried out was a common one and most people even at his age dont  stay 24 hours . They did not need to keep a crew there 4 days there was little chance of a hearse turning up .

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I'm quite glad to read the subtext myself,
''There is no new financial crisis removing everyones funds from the vaults; - and on the weather front no earthquakes have been reported in the Dordogne nor yet a Tsunami reported heading into Dorset (even if we had a little taste of it today[:)]) - Back to you safely returned from your walk; home; munching a crumpet.[:D]

 

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[quote user="cooperlola"]

Whilst I do understand the irritation about paying some weather guy to tell us what we already know, I wonder what would happen if no reporter ever went to the scene of a story to check up on the facts? Are we perhaps becoming a little blase about the news because so much of it seems to be provided by amateurs with modern cellphones and vox-pop reports from the "man in the street"?  It seems daft in a way, but without genuine reporters spending time getting to the bottom of things, I'm not at all convinced we'd be better off. 

If the Storyville documentary about the New York Times comes back on BBC4 - give it a look.  A fascinating insight into the way amateur news coverage can be an enemy to the truth.  Riveting and apposite.

[/quote]

Cooperlola, reporters at the scene have always, well for years and years anyway, been a feature of television news, and they do give an immediacy to the stories they're reporting on, but in the last couple of years, they appear to be putting themselves so far into the thick of things that they are barely able to make themselves heard. Similarly this morning a BBC reporter somewhere on a beach being blown to hell by the gale could hardly be heard above the noise of that wind.

So I too say "Why?"

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Why can I never find a news channel that reports only the "news" that I want to know?

Other than really important topics like NH racing and cycling there is little that goes on in UK that interests me certainly not the antics of "celebrities" or the weather over there (or anywhere except here).

Think how much money the BBC could save by not bothering to report any news, there are many other places to find out if anyone is bothered.

John

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