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C4 Picasso anyone ?


Russethouse
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[quote user="AnOther"][quote user="Russethouse"]On the other hand this car has an electronic hand brake[/quote]Is that supposed to be a good thing ?

IMO it's just another 'modern and efficient' convenience you can take and shove in the same useless bin as the auto wipers and lights [blink]

Still, if you're happy nothing else matters does it, but then you were presumably happy with the C3 when you bought that  hey ho [;-)]

[/quote]

That's progress ...the concept of a useless bin...just think we could dispense with the intermittent wipe or the wiper altogether...traffic signals they are automatic too get rid of them!...as for air conditioning, ABS, stability control, common rail engines, limited slip differentials get rid of the lot..clearly the workl of the devil.....

Durrrrrr

 

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[quote user="Russethouse"] I do look at Honest John but I couldn't find a 2010 Picasso on there...   [/quote]

http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/citroen/c4-picasso-2007/

This means that from 2007 on,  it is the same model with upgrades, watch out for :-

Waterpumps of 2.0 litre petrol engines  can fail early, flinging off the timing belt and wrecking the engine.

16-8-2011: Citroen will not cover the Dual Mass Flywheel under the 3 year warranty

5-2-2012: More reports of turbo oil starvation on 1.6HDI DV6TED4 leading to expensive catastrophes at around 100,000 miles due to carbon build up in the oil feed to the bearing. The cure is not just a new turbo, but new oil pipe, pump, pick-up, etc., etc. Failure to replace these paerts will usually result in another failed turbo within 10,000 miles. There was a Ford TSB45/2008 about this. Newer engines (2008+) have modified parts. Apparently you can get a new turbo for £350 plus £120 for a "kit" of modified pipes/pick-up unions etc. from Transitpartsuk (International Parts Ltd) to fit next week. eBay supplier TransitpartsUK

11-8-2012: Report of high pressure fuel pump failing on 1.6THP 150 petrol engined C4 Picasso 3 months out of 3 year warranty.

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[quote user="AnOther"]There's nothing better to emasculate an argument than a good old double dose of sarcasm and hyperbole         Life is too short for regrets but if I am to have any I'd rather they were for things I have done than for things I have not [:P]
[/quote]

While laughing I can't help but note that the strapline says it all really...there's a chap who prefers DIY...right down to the windsceen wipers :)

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[quote user="AnOther"]You just don't seem to get it do you, I prefer things which serve a useful or practical purpose not gimmicks which exist simply because they can [;-)]
[/quote]

I read some statistics the other day that said the majority of accidents happen after the driver has made some sort of action, fiddled with the radio, reached for something to eat etc, so I guess the more things that happen automatically, wipers, lights etc the safer it is......

Having said that, I have never used the audio controls on near the steering wheel, nor used cruise control.....(why would I ?)

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[quote user="Russethouse"]

[quote user="AnOther"]You just don't seem to get it do you, I prefer things which serve a useful or practical purpose not gimmicks which exist simply because they can [;-)]
[/quote]

I read some statistics the other day that said the majority of accidents happen after the driver has made some sort of action, fiddled with the radio, reached for something to eat etc, so I guess the more things that happen automatically, wipers, lights etc the safer it is......

Having said that, I have never used the audio controls on near the steering wheel, nor used cruise control.....(why would I ?)

[/quote]

Checked makeup, fiddled with hair, smacked kids, made a fone call, the list is endless!
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The Eurofighter Typhoon features a glass cockpit without any conventional instruments. It incorporates three full colour multi-function head-down displays (MHDDs) (the formats on which are manipulated by means of softkeys, XY cursor, and voice (Direct Voice Input or DVI) command), a wide angle head-up display (HUD) with forward-looking infrared (FLIR), a voice and hands-on throttle and stick (Voice+HOTAS), a Helmet Mounted Symbology System (HMSS), a Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS), a manual data-entry facility (MDEF) located on the left glareshield and a fully integrated aircraft warning system with a dedicated warnings panel (DWP). Reversionary flying instruments, lit by LEDs, are located under a hinged right glareshield.[77]

Needs of the user were given very high priority in the design of the cockpit: the layout and functionality was created through feedback and assessments from military pilots and a specialist testing facility.[78] The pilot controls the aircraft by means of a centre stick and left hand throttles, designed on a Hand on Throttle and Stick (HOTAS) principle to lower pilot workloads.[79] Emergency escape is provided by a Martin-Baker Mk.16A ejection seat, with the canopy being jettisoned by two rocket motors.[80] The HMSS has been delayed for many years but should be operational by the end of 2011.[81]

The aircraft's standard g-force protection is provided by the full-cover anti-g trousers (FCAGTs).[82] This specially developed g suit provides sustained protection up to 9 g. The Typhoon pilots of the German Air Force and Austrian Air Force wear a hydrostatic g-suit called Libelle (dragonfly) Multi G Plus instead,[83][84][85] which also provides protection to the arms, theoretically allowing for more complete g tolerance.

In the event of pilot disorientation, the Flight Control System allows for rapid and automatic recovery by the simple press of a button. On selection of this cockpit control the FCS takes full control of the engines and flying controls, and automatically stabilises the aircraft in a wings level, gentle climbing attitude at 300 knots, until the pilot is ready to retake control.[86]

The aircraft also has an Automatic Low-Speed Recovery system (ALSR) which prevents it from departing from controlled flight at very low speeds and high angle of attack. The FCS system is able to detect a developing low-speed situation and to raise an audible and visual low-speed cockpit warning. This gives the pilot sufficient time to react and to recover the aircraft manually. If the pilot does not react, however, or if the warning is ignored, the ALSR takes control of the aircraft, selects maximum dry power for the engines and returns the aircraft to a safe flight condition. Depending on the attitude, the FCS employs an ALSR "push", "pull" or "knife-over" manoeuvre.[87]

[edit] Voice control

The Typhoon Direct Voice Input (DVI) system utilises a speech recognition module (SRM), developed by Smiths Aerospace (now GE Aviation Systems) and Computing Devices (now General Dynamics UK). It was the first production DVI system utilised in a military cockpit. DVI provides the pilot with an additional natural mode of command and control over approximately 26 non-critical cockpit functions, to reduce pilot workload, improve aircraft safety, and expand mission capabilities. An important step in the development of the DVI occurred in 1987 when Texas Instruments completed the TMS-320-C30, a digital signal processor, enabling reductions in the size and system complexity required. The project was given the go ahead in July 1997, with development and pilot assessment carried out on the Eurofighter Active Cockpit Simulator at BAE Systems Warton.[88]

The DVI system is speaker-dependent; i.e., requires each pilot to create a template. It is not used for any safety-critical or weapon-critical tasks, such as weapon release or lowering of the undercarriage, but is used for a wide range of other cockpit functions.[89][90] Voice commands are confirmed by visual or aural feedback. The system is seen as a major design feature in the reduction of pilot workload. All functions are also achievable by means of a conventional button-press or soft-key selections. The functions include display management, communications, and management of various systems.[91]

EADS Defence and Security in Spain has worked on a new non-template DVI module to allow for continuous speech recognition, speaker voice recognition with common databases (e.g. British English, American English, etc.) and other

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[quote user="Rabbie"][quote user="powerdesal"]Very interesting and informative Big Mac but is it relevant to a C4 Picasso ??????[/quote]This is a forum. Why should posts bear any relationship or relevance to the thread title or previous posts[:D][/quote]

Not relevant to the Citroen Picasso (a worthy conveyor of brethren and familial appendages) but serves to point out that technology can assist the operator to do the important stuff....Eurofighter Typhoon and well equipped cars the more assistance via technology the more one can focus on what truly matters.

I think it odd that a modern motor with all its microproccessors, ECUs, fuel metering, Aircon, EGR, ABS, CD or even DVD, Sat nav etc. may have a driver who resents technology enough to disarm central locking and eschews auto wipers or lights....

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