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ive been told that there are rules regarding the disposale of pool waste water, like when backwashing or emptying the pool, but I cant find anything where I can read about them.  Is ther a rule about how close to boundries like walls and neigbours it has to be or near a road?  Does this just apply to salt pools or to others?
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I catch all the waste water from the pool in two large containers.

After a while all the clorine disappears and then you can water the plants with it.

No problems so far, but no doubt some would-be bio-chemist will disagree with this............[:D][:D]

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I'd be interested in the answer to that, as well.  Come April we'll be having a new liner fitted, and thus need to dump about 80 cubic metres of salt water.  The only place it can go is down a steep hill, in the road.  When we backwash, that's where it goes, largely unnoticed.  But a poolfull...

Chris

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Hi Chris, I do not know the law for this in France, however "the only place it can go"? can you not arrange a makeshift pipe run into a proper drain? rather than poison the plants and trees in the line of fire so to speak.

So now you realise another reason why salt water chlorination is not a very clever idea, at least bugbear can wait until the chlorine has evaporated before re-using the water (stout fellow) [:)]

Why not change to a different system?

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When we had a salt water pool put in the lady at the Mairie asked what we would do with the waste water, we have no drains being countryfied. I replied that we would just pump it into the garden and she seemed happy with that. As we are on a hill I suppose in time it might migrate to the stream on the other side of our field which backs onto the garden. As it is so far away I suspect it would take many years before this happened if ever and we have never had to pump the pool dry, just enough to reduce the level when it rains. The amount of sodium chloride in a salt water pool is very low,  say 18 x 25kg sacks in 75 metres cubed and a top up of 5 to 6 sacks a year. Soils often have natural levels of salts, I doubt that once in a very long while would make much difference. More than one site has expressed this view. "Saltwater pools offer an eco-friendly alternative for those practicing a green lifestyle and are less harmful to the environment due to not having to use of harsh chemicals" Our garden has not suffered and things grow as much as they ever did!.............................JR

 

PS I suspect that as far as the environment goes the electricity used by the electrolytic cell that generates the chlorine might be more of an issue, say 100 to 120 watts when it is running.
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[quote user="JohnRoss"]

 "Saltwater pools offer an eco-friendly alternative for those practicing a green lifestyle and are less harmful to the environment due to not having to use of harsh chemicals"

[/quote]

Now I know you are quoting not stating JohnRoss, but never has there been so much "sales patter" as the above quote. As you say the electricity is required to break down some of the salt into the "harsh chemical" to sanitise the pool. Salt pools are chlorine pools. You make the chlorine on site as apposed to adding it directly.

I am not saying that they do not work, just the way people are advised is sales talk.

 

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I can only speak from personal experience but I must say that on balance I feel the salt water pool has some advantages over others in that we use no other chemicals in the pool other than salt. We don't get green water as some do over winter therefore no chemicals to add to get rid of the algae. There is little chlorine smell/free gas and nobody that has used our pool has complained of skin or lung irritation. I am not a chemist so I cannot say that there is a difference between adding chlorine blocks and generating it electrically but I suspect there maybe if only by the lack of smell. The running cost of the chlorine generator is small compared with the cost of running the pump. Wildlife that falls in from time to time usually survive, always a few froggys to be found. Of course I am biased but only by experience and nothing else..................JR
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John Ross as well as ChrisN Julie are breaking the law.

That is the European directive on expelling polluted water into the environment and if anyone in the Government cared enough to investigate it then those guilty ones would certainly be fined.

You may not just expel your highly salinated water onto the land or into a drain or wherever, for it will certainly result in the poisoning of the soil in its wake and kill every living thing eventually. The levels are not low they are 3000ppm or more and plants will tolerate no more than about 1000ppm for short periods with a fresh water flush afterwards. So get informed on this you are NOT doing a responsible thing and it is a shame.

Really, it ridiculous and scandalous that marketers can peddle such drivel that salt systems are 'ECO-Friendly' because the truth is the contrary, its just such a shame that unwitting customers ignorant of the consequences are sucked into this vandalism- turning precious potable water into saline and then spreading it on the land any where they feel like it. Makes one long for the return of the Water Police like there was 3 years ago.

Andrew

 

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I would be grateful if you could provide a link to read this law. Pool water needs to be discharged somewhere. If what you say is the case then the water will have to be discharged and retained within the property. The level of salt of 3000 parts per million is very weak,  less than that of human tears 4000 to 8000ppm, about a twelfth or less of sea water I understand. Rain dilutes this level further but if a discharge into the ground is verboten then I suppose you could retain it in a shallow open pond and collect the salt once the water has evaporated.

I would have thought that non salt pools would also be a hazard on discharge because of the added chemicals that salt pools don't need! What does the law say about this? The problem is that it is mostly only in winter that pumping out a small percentage of pool water is needed because of rain. Storing a few thousand litres of water until warmer weather might be a problem for some. One could, I suppose if push comes to shove, turn off the Chlorinator cell and add chlorine tablets having replaced the water. We could, of course, go over to a UV system or some such. It would seem that this law is about as sensible as the one about pool alarms and/or fences, alright in theory but not that practical or effective as other countries have proved! I understand that you don't sell or like salt water pools but there are lots of firms in France that do. Have the authorities expressed negative thoughts about salt water pools towards these firms. This would be the simplest way of enforcing such a law!...............JR

PS Like your video about solar heating, must be a good money spinner!  

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[quote user="JohnRoss"]I can only speak from personal experience but I must say that on balance. Because you have already bought one and therefore are unlikely to change it in the short term sort of balance [:)] I feel the salt water pool has some advantages over others in that we use no other chemicals in the pool other than salt. What advantages? You add a load of salt and the electricity does the rest? You don't add Cyanuric acid to stabilise the chlorine? then you are exposing people to a lot more chlorine. don't get green water as some do over winter therefore no chemicals to add to get rid of the algae. If properly managed others would not get algae either you only hear problems from the people that missmanage. Like wise we hear from salt pool owners who have PH up in the 9n's & 10n's and above. There is little chlorine smell/free gas Again that would be said of a correctly running chlorine pool, its the chloramines that you smell. and nobody that has used our pool has complained of skin or lung irritation. I am not a chemist so I cannot say that there is a difference between adding chlorine blocks and generating it electrically but I suspect there maybe if only by the lack of smell. The running cost of the chlorine generator is small compared with the cost of running the pump. Until its time to replace the salt cell/ionising unit.  Wildlife that falls in from time to time usually survive, always a few froggys to be found. Of course I am biased but only by experience and nothing else..................JR[/quote]

My point JohnRoss is that people constantly say we don't have a chlorine pool, we have a salt water pool which is wrong and the sales staff tell you how "natural" it is, refering to the sea, does the sea have two huge plates passing an electric current through it breaking it down into chlorine? don't think so [geek] As I have said on many occasions, "it's a chemical soup whichever flavour you choose" [:D]

But then I am biased too, my pool has no nasty chlorine smell, because it contains no Chlorine. It does not taste salty. It neither contains or needs cyanuric acid because the the active sanitiser does not evaporate under sunlight like chlorine and I can water my garden with the back wash.

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"the active sanitiser does not evaporate under sunlight like chlorine" Interesting, what system do you have? Do you flog these? I check the Chlorine levels frequently in the swimming season and they are Ok, not too high and I have not ever had to add acid to keep them up . The cell shows no sign of needing replacement after 7 years of use! Your turn...........JR

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[quote user="JohnRoss"]

"the active sanitiser does not evaporate under sunlight like chlorine" Interesting, what system do you have? Do you flog these? I check the Chlorine levels frequently in the swimming season and they are Ok, not too high and I have not ever had to add acid to keep them up . The cell shows no sign of needing replacement after 7 years of use! Your turn...........JR

[/quote]

Don't get me wrong JohnRoss, the system works. Its purely the natural salt water clap as said by the sales person I object to. Interested in chlorine levels are ok, any figures you could give me? Cyanuric acid is not used to keep them up, rather to keep them down.  There is some disparity between the free chlorine measurement and the actual agressive chlorine content (this we are looking into)  Another salt pool that is now looked after by a collegue also has no cyanuric acid in it and has been considerably clean and clearer than when it did.  7 years is ok, it depends on usage of course, when it eventually fails would you look at a different system?

You have guessed, of course I sell that system [:)]

I don't belive I am allowed to show the site on the forum, I have not worked out what is meant by "no unsolicited advertising" what about solicited advertising [:D]

I can PM you if you would like to take a look as I know you are not in the market of purchasing for at least another 3 or 4 years [;-)]

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[quote user="JohnRoss"]

I would be grateful if you could provide a link to read this law. Pool water needs to be discharged somewhere. If what you say is the case then the water will have to be discharged and retained within the property. The level of salt of 3000 parts per million is very weak,  less than that of human tears 4000 to 8000ppm, about a twelfth or less of sea water I understand. Rain dilutes this level further but if a discharge into the ground is verboten then I suppose you could retain it in a shallow open pond and collect the salt once the water has evaporated.

I would have thought that non salt pools would also be a hazard on discharge because of the added chemicals that salt pools don't need! What does the law say about this? The problem is that it is mostly only in winter that pumping out a small percentage of pool water is needed because of rain. Storing a few thousand litres of water until warmer weather might be a problem for some. One could, I suppose if push comes to shove, turn off the Chlorinator cell and add chlorine tablets having replaced the water. We could, of course, go over to a UV system or some such. It would seem that this law is about as sensible as the one about pool alarms and/or fences, alright in theory but not that practical or effective as other countries have proved! I understand that you don't sell or like salt water pools but there are lots of firms in France that do. Have the authorities expressed negative thoughts about salt water pools towards these firms. This would be the simplest way of enforcing such a law!...............JR

PS Like your video about solar heating, must be a good money spinner!  

[/quote]

JohnROss

You have 3000ppm in your pool, so if you backwash once a week as you should, then after 10 weeks you have expelled the same level of salt as putting sea water on your garden. So the level you have is detrimental to the environment, that it  - please accept that fact and stop trying to make excuses by bringing in irrelevancies, like tears and enforcement and the like, none of that matters. You have made a choice, albeit a bad one in my eyes, but why should you care about that. What matters and the only thing that is important is that you should now modify your practices to take account of your situation. So your backwash water should indeed go into a lined pond where it cannot be absorbed into the soil and there in evaporate so that the salt can be gathered and disposed of (in the sea, or back into your pool). If you are waiting for someone to FORCE you to do it then you'll wait a long time as the Authorities have many more delinquent polluters to catch before they get to you or any other salt pool owner, or the industry as a whole for that matter. The environment has never been high on the agenda in France, but this is stuff that exemplar countries like Australia, Israel and certainly Scandinavian member states would be vitally concerned about. But here, .... BOUF!!! SO you can join them (boufe... shruugg) and never care less and blame everyone else for the consequence or you can be part of the solution and care a little bit, by saving the salt that you love so much and reusing it instead of aiming for the nearest stream.

Our generation has for along time been used to doing whatsoever we liked for our own comfort and pleasure without a careless of the consequence. It comes as no surprise to me that the climate seems to be on the attack and a lot of other natural phenomena are arriving at a suspiciously intense way a little too frequently. Do you get the feeling that these might be connected somehow???

Andrew

PS yes thank you, the Solar heating workes very well.

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For a biased collection of info on why saltwater chlorine generator (SWG) pools are bad, there's [url=http://thepoolbiz.blogspot.com/]this blog[/url].  Most people are happy with their SWG pools, but for the industry to deny the issues, many of which can be mitigated (e.g. sealing soft stone), is irresponsible.  The issues revolve around 1) disposal of removed high salt level water, 2) salt splash-out and evaporation causing some soft stone to degrade, 3) more rapid deterioration of steel from dripped salt water from swimsuits, 4) more rapid deterioration of stainless steel and aluminum and copper.

Regular manual or automated (e.g. peristaltic pump) dosing of chlorine will build up salt as well.  For every 10 ppm Free Chlorine (FC) added by chlorinating liquid or bleach, it will end up adding 16 ppm salt.  8 ppm salt gets added upon initial addition of chemical and another 8 ppm salt gets created when the chlorine gets used up (the latter is true from any source of chlorine).  If one has a cartridge filter so does not backwash and one does not have winter overflow perhaps due to a pool cover with a pool cover pump, then the salt in the pool can build up.  At 1 ppm FC per day chlorine usage and a 6-month season, that's 288 ppm salt added each season.  So after some number of years one can get to 1000 or 1500 ppm salt.  If, on the other hand, one is regularly diluting the water (say, from weekly backwashing), then the salt level takes longer to climb and eventually will level out.

Unless an extra algaecide is used, an SWG pool needs a minimum Free Chlorine (FC) level that is at least 4.5% of the Cyanuric Acid (CYA) level to prevent green algae which initially just looks like dull water with extra chlorine demand.  The 1-3 ppm FC with 60-80 ppm CYA most manufacturers recommend is not sufficient.  If you don't use any CYA at all, then this is too strong in active chlorine level as you cannot effectively have only 0.1 ppm FC with no CYA in the pool.  The only reports of rapid (< 1 year) stainless steel corrosion we've seen on other pool forums have been with SWG pools with no CYA (they had no CYA because they were indoor pools and bought into the "CYA is only needed to protect chorine from sunlight" half-truth).  As I linked to in another post, the chlorine/CYA relationship was definitively determined in 1974 in the paper in [url=http://richardfalk.home.comcast.net/~richardfalk/pool/OBrien.htm]this link[/url].

Richard

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This is all very well, but doesn't really answer my question.  At a guess, I would suggest that the saltwater to non-saltwater pool ratio in the country is probably about 50/50.  Everyone I know around here has a saltwater pool (and not all from the same installer, either), and wouldn't change.  There are times in the life of most lined pools that it will be necessary to discharge ALL the water for one reason or another, and this must have been obvious at the time of installation.  I can appreciated that certain posters who may be installers themselves may have an axe to grind in one direction or the other for various products, but that notwithstanding, who is going to have space on their respective properties to store a poolfull of water anywhere other than in the pool?  the water HAS to be discharged somewhere.

Poolguy, thanks for pointing out that I am "breaking the law" - that's a very high stance to adopt, I'm merely looking for advice as to how best to cope with the situation I will find myself in in April.  I live on the top of a hill in a sparsely populated area.  I have no alternative than to let water run downhill - somewhere.  The road to which I referred is a narrow track, and serves my property solely, and there are no drains.  I just don't want to upset anyone and to execute this operation with the least fuss. The water would merely disperse eventually down various banks into surrounding scrubby vegetation, after which I don't envisage a visit from the gendarmerie, en-masse.

Realistically, I can see that having little or no long term effect on the environment at all, and certainly none worth getting excited about.  I was merely seeking a simpler alternative, of which there really appears to be none.

I see little point in changing from a saltwater pool just for the sake of it, when it has been trouble free since we've been here, very pleasant to use, with no added chemicals necessary - ever, and certainly no green algae (or anything else) forming.  The only problem we had last year was with a faulty Sterilor unit.  We looked at the possibility of changing then to a fresh water set up, but decided against it and replaced the Sterilor unit instead.  And faults can occur in any equipment at any time.  And now we need to replace the liner after 15 years.  A not uncommon situation, I suspect.

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This Parliamentary answer seems to have it both ways. You can tip it down the drains, you can have it collected by a vidangeur, you can spray it on your own land. It could be treated as pollution......

Evacuation des eaux provenant d'une piscine privée

1er décembre 2005

Question écrite n° 13862 de M. Philippe Leroy (Moselle - UMP) publiée dans le JO Sénat du 30/09/2004

M. Philippe Leroy prie M. le ministre de l'équipement, des transports, de l'aménagement du territoire, du tourisme et de la mer de bien vouloir lui indiquer si l'évacuation des eaux d'une piscine privée, non ouverte au public, constitue, comme l'analyse l'Office national de l'eau, une évacuation d'eaux usées domestiques. Il semble qu'aucune réglementation n'ait été édictée à ce sujet. Des particuliers évacuent leurs eaux dans leur propriété à même le sol, ce qui occasionne parfois des écoulements intempestifs dans des propriétés voisines. Si de tels rejets ne pouvaient être écoulés dans un réseau d'assainissement collectif, mais aussi dans l'hypothèse où la piscine serait située dans une propriété équipée d'un dispositif d'assainissement non collectif, il lui demande de lui préciser les solutions qui peuvent être retenues pour l'évacuation des eaux provenant de ladite piscine, d'une part, et, d'autre part, si un déversement en pleine nature est constitutif d'une infraction au code de la santé publique.

Ministère de réponse : Santé et solidarités - Réponse publiée au JO Sénat le 01/12/2005

L'article 22 du décret 94-469 du 3 juin 1994 stipule qu'il est interdit d'introduire dans les systèmes de collecte des eaux de vidange des bassins de natation. Toutefois, ce même article prévoit des dérogations précisées par arrêté ministériel et accordées par le préfet après avis du conseil départemental d'hygiène. L'évacuation dans un réseau public d'égout des eaux des bassins d'une piscine privée fait partie de ces dérogations et est donc tolérée en tant qu'eaux usées domestiques. En effet, les volumes d'eau des piscines privées sont limités et représentent un afflux généralement faible à l'échelle d'un service d'assainissement d'une collectivité. Néanmoins, il est souhaitable d'en préciser les conditions dans le règlement de ce service. En tout état de cause, ce type de rejet doit faire l'objet d'un avis du service technique. Il est à noter que dans le cas d'un rejet dans le réseau des eaux usées d'une piscine privée, et selon les conditions locales particulières, une redevance d'assainissement spécifique peut être envisagée. Lorsque la piscine est située dans une propriété qui n'est pas raccordée au réseau d'assainissement, le système d'assainissement non collectif, ne peut recevoir un tel volume d'eau sur une brève période sans entraîner un détérioration du fonctionnement du dispositif. Dans cette hypothèse, le propriétaire est libre du choix des moyens de vidange de sa piscine (recours à un vidangeur professionnel, arrosage de sa propriété, etc.). Concernant les écoulements intempestifs sur les propriétés voisines lors de la vidange des piscines privées, la jurisprudence considère, en application de l'article 640 du code civil, qu'il s'agit d'une aggravation anormale de la servitude d'écoulement des eaux. Ainsi, le propriétaire d'une piscine qui, lors de la vidange de celle-ci, inonde le fonds voisin doit, même en l'absence de dommage matériel, réparer le trouble de jouissance subi par le propriétaire du fonds inondé. Enfin, un déversement en pleine nature des eaux d'une piscine privée n'est pas constitutif d'une infraction au code de la santé publique mais peut constituer une infraction à l'article L. 211-2 du code de l'environnement.

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Bravo CnJ could not have put it better myself. Have a look at this http://www.lacsd.org/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=2329 see points 5 and 6, is this to come here?

The bottom line is that as you say there are large numbers of salt water pools in France so if the authorities think we are all doomed if we continue to release small amounts of salt then surely they would make a law against further installation of salt water pools. Then by public notices persuade us to go over to some other form of sterilization like UV,  chlorine blocks or whatever.

Is this getting out of proportion? What about the tons of salt put on the roads in the UK and the US washed into the water courses. What about the salt put into cooking water? If you stopped having salt water pools what significant effect would it have on the environment. Are we sweeping the floor as the house falls down? So Pool Guy, Teapot educate us, give us the links for this French law re salt water pools ( The above does not seem to mention salt), the evidence of the dangers of salt pool environment contamination, without bias and self interest of course...............................JR

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Isn't the human mind a wonderful thing?

The original poster Wiseinhindsight posted as to whether there are rules regarding the emptying or backwashing. ChrisnJulie, wrote a similar concern, why?

Was it because they know that morally pouring 80,000 litres of water contaminated with salt on to the land could be bad, No.

When others pointed out that salt pools were exactly the same as the chemicals used in chlorine pools once the chlorinator (clue in the name) had done its job, with the exception that with a chlorine pool once the chlorine has evaporated off it posses hardly any risk to flora and forna and can then be used to water the garden did that make any difference, No.

When the topic of "green living" arrose, ChrisnJulie and JohnRoss defended their "ecologically sound pools" because they only ever add salt, nothing else!

It seems that now there are two people with the same system on this thread it is ok to do what ever they want with the waste water because unless they are prosecuted its ok, The green living idea, R.I.P

As ChrisnJulie have no other alternative but to pour the water away down the hill, why did they ever post on the thread, they are going to do it anyway law or no law because no one is going to prosecute them.

That is the same arrogance shown by Americans, unless it decided otherwise in a court of law then it must be right.

During the discussion I asked if knowing now that there is a problem with the disposal of salt water and knowing there are alternatives which are more ecologically better would you change? No because we only add salt and lots of people have salt pools.  Well there you have it, as long as lots of people are doing it its ok.

Of course the only reason Pool guy and myself object to salt pool chlorination is because we don't sell it. Ever thought that we have access to most of the large pool equipment suppliers world wide and could arrange to sell chlorinators from just a phone call but we don't and if its all about money as JohnRoss comments then we have really lost out.

No, the reason is because there are better alternatives.

I have said all that I am going to say on this thread.

A nod is as good a wink to a blind horse.

 

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JohnROss

Chris N Julie

 

You have made your choice and really I don’t really care what you do, as there is nothing I can say or do to change it, so I do not try.

 

Generally, I post in the third person (mostly), I’ve done that for nearly 5 years so that Newbies to the forum and to pools can get some information rather than the drivel that is thrown at them from all corners to help them make their decisions, hopefully good one’s. I do that graciously and freely and I find that occasionally some people do want to learn more and then turn into clients. But it is absolutely certain than the vast majority of people who have benefited from my advise over the years have never bought a thing of me. So, If I was a really smart business man then I should certainly stop posting on this forum, because it is not commercially fruitful, but that is NOT WHAT ITS FOR and that’s not why I do it.

 

To the matter at hand- that of waist water. The Law I am referring to is a European Directive, which is clear an unequivocal, however the Member states interpret it as they want and France’s as you see is some what ‘watered down’ from the original. That does not change the Original Directive, and by the way I did not invent it, write it nor am I on a crusade to enforce it. I have pointed out its existence, that’ll do. If you care at all and what to know more then I suggest that you do your own research and in doing so perhaps you might come across the research on the effects of salination, including Road salting, swimming pools backwash, industrial outwash and the general advance of the deserts worldwide.

 

Certainly, I don’t see the point of citing Public Policy from the US as examples of anything as its general knowledge that the framework of policy is for sale to the highest bidder in that country. It takes a lot to be the biggest polluter on earth for 2 decades running, thanks to a succession of Administrations whose sympathies lie with the ‘Have’s and the Have More’s(ed G. W Bush  2003)

 

You don’t like my advise OK not everybody does, but I don’t care. I’ll continue to give it so long as there are some people who do like it. They email me quite a lot and say ‘ thanks’ or ‘keep up the good work’, one person wrote to say ‘ you’ve saved me a fortune’. That was nice.

 

My dear Colleague Teapot has made the case well so I’ll leave that with you, and please carry on as you like, your choice suits you but destroys the land around you for ever more…. So enjoy it…. I     don’t    care.

 

Andrew
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These forums are fascinating!  In my naivety I had thought that folk used them to request advice or impart knowledge.  Yet there have been a couple of recent threads - this being one of them - where a genuine request is spun back as a criticism of the situation the 'requestor' finds themselves in and lead to an exhortation to pursue a different (and in all probability costly) water treatment process.  The original request was for specific information on the 'rules'; when this did not materialise the request was changed by asking to be 'pointed/linked' to the relevant rules.  On the face of it, this does not seem an unreasonable request.

I don't have a salt water pool, so the answer is of only passing interest to me, but why don't those who appear to have such detailed knowledge of the rules just provide the link then JohnRoss and Chris N Julie - and all the others that are following the thread and waiting for the answer - can read it for themselves and decide how to proceed?

Or is that too simple?

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Well after being away for a couple of days my original question seems to have been hijacked.  For the record, I don't have a salt water pool.  A neighbor has told me that I am not supporsed to backwash my pool water close to his boundry wall.  I just want to know if he is legally right or whether there are suposed to be rules about it or not.  my French isn't good enough to translate the French question and reply, so I'm still not any wiser.  W e all appreciate the help that the pros give I'm sure.
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Strange, isn't it, that when one posts here for some advice, and explains a situation, really only looking for sensible direction, that only those who have a commercial interest slam into one as if one is a petty criminal, and assure one that their product is by far the best, whatever it is, and the alternatives are verboten.

I really don't need conveniently "green" directions - just an idea of how best to get around an impending situation.  That I have to empty my pool is a given.  The alternatives to dumping the water are virtually non-existent in my situation.  I have thought carefully about a possible environmental impact, and honestly considered there to be none.  To be even more honest, I was more concerned about a river of water swooshing off down the road, but s0d it, I'll do it anyway - everyone else does with no obvious effect.

So you can wag your fingers at me, and take as many sharp intakes of breath as you like, you vendors of non-salt pools.  I will seek future advice from sources without a commercial interest.  I expect you all believe in the man-made global warming myth, too.

Chris

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Sadly hijacking happens all too often. This section of the Minister's reply in 2005 as kindly posted by BJSLIV on machine translation reads as, the owner of a swimming pool which, during the emptying of this one, floods the neighbouring fund must, even in the absence of material damage, repair the confusion of pleasure been subjected by the owner of the flooded fund. (I think I would translate fond as basement or maybe just low lying land.) So if it were me I would avoid any risk of water getting visibly onto my neighbours property. Would it be possible to by means of some extension hose or pipe to direct the waste water from backwashing to some other part of your property especially as your neighbour has already indicated his disquiet?

 

On the subject of French law relating to salt water pools so far there seems to be no clear evidence of a specific regulation to guide us in this matter. I think most of us do care about our home, this planet, but initial searches reveal sites that are very pro salt water pools versus other types and most do have a financial interest in saying so. An almost equal number of sites say that the salt water pool is the spawn of the devil and only The Doctor can save us. You have guessed it, they sell non salt water systems! One still hopes for links to unbiased sites for both matters.

 

A guide to the way in which officials think was indicated to me when we had our fosse inspection. The inspector asked if the discharge from the fosse went into the ditch at the side of the road. I showed him where the outlet ran into two soakaway gravel filter beds located about 5 metres from this ditch and he was quite happy with this! Our well water on analysis is chemically sound but is crawling with E.coli and is down stream, as it were, from a field full of pooing cows and our neighbour's fosse. Where is the greater health hazard this or a little bit of water being a very weak saline solution?.......................JR
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[quote user="wiseinhindsight"]Well after being away for a couple of days my original question seems to have been hijacked.  For the record, I don't have a salt water pool.  A neighbor has told me that I am not supporsed to backwash my pool water close to his boundry wall.  I just want to know if he is legally right or whether there are suposed to be rules about it or not.  my French isn't good enough to translate the French question and reply, so I'm still not any wiser.  W e all appreciate the help that the pros give I'm sure.[/quote]

Well I didn't consider my offering to be anything other than helpful advice.

Hijacking is pretty normal you just have to sift through it.

[quote user="ChrisnJulie"]

Strange, isn't it,

that when one posts here for some advice, and explains a situation,

really only looking for sensible direction, that only those who have a

commercial interest slam into one as if one is a petty criminal, and

assure one that their product is by far the best, whatever it is, and the alternatives are verboten.

I really don't need conveniently "green"

directions - just an idea of how best to get around an impending

situation.  That I have to empty my pool is a given.  The alternatives

to dumping the water are virtually non-existent in my situation.  I

have thought carefully about a possible environmental impact, and

honestly considered there to be none.  To be even more honest, I was

more concerned about a river of water swooshing off down the road, but

s0d it, I'll do it anyway - everyone else does with no obvious effect.

So you can wag your fingers at me, and take as

many sharp intakes of breath as you like, you vendors of non-salt

pools.  I will seek future advice from sources without a commercial

interest.  I expect you all believe in the man-made global warming

myth, too.

Chris

[/quote]

Ditto................

.

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Hi

Have just read throught this thread, and just to hijack it a touchette plus;  would like to know what the experts deem to be the "greenest " pool is to install, are they more difficult to maintain and their comparative running and installation costs.

Thanks Wilko

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