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Why are house prices falling in Dordogneshire?


mint
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The current economic problems are not comparable to the late eighties and early nineties, as unfortunately it is much worse with the current circumstances outside living memory for most people. As a result house prices are likely to fall much further and take much longer to recover than previous downturns.

I don't believe the majority of Brits bought homes abroad purely for investment reasons, quite the contrary as from my experience the primary motivator was to get a place in the sun to escape the British weather!

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We live in an area where there are a fair amount of foreigners.  The number has increased since we first bought here, though a lot of them are here just for the holidays.  Although we did not come here to be part of a British community (actually there weren’t any at that time !), it really doesn’t bother us that others have moved to our area.  We are not forced to live in each others’ pockets, after all.

As other posters have said, we all have the ‘right’ to be here – luckily we still have a modicum of freedom of choice.  That choice  extends to who we have as friends.  We couldn’t care less what nationality or background our friends are as long as they are people we get on with.  Having lived in other countries, we don’t like to stereotype nationalities, though of course they all have their peculiar quirks and characteristics !

It amuses us when French friends ask us if we know so-and-so « You must know them, they’re British ».  If we meet people, no matter what nationality, and they aren’t our cup of tea, we don’t get involved.

We don't discuss what we paid for things nor our personal finances.  These are things we feel are not the business of others.  There are plenty of people who are happy to be open about money.  When we first moved here permanently, a Frenchman asked us how much we had paid for our tractor.  He was simply curious.  I smiled and said it was an indiscreet question to ask a Brit, and he was quite happy with that.

Et voilà ![:D]

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Sweet 17 wrote:

''GG, when did you last go to a dinner party or indeed any social gathering which is attended by Brits?

Believe me, they talk of nothing else in West London.''

We don't go to dinner parties - haven't for years. But we have meals with people and take part in various social activities both in UK and France. I repeat, we've not come across anyone discussing house prices. I exclude our son, who is about to move house; he obviously discussed prices of houses he was interested in.

The little french town where our apartment is situated gets quite busy on Saturdays, when a very popular market is held. Many British people come to it, amongst many other nationalities - and it was almost as busy as in high summer last weekend - but even in the busy cafe in the market square, where we hear quite a lot of English voices, I can't recall anyone discussing house prices.

Jo

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Kingadingaling wrote:

"The Dordogne is prettier than the Charente Maritime
You say Dordogneshire, there are just as many brits in the Dordogne than in CM, or Charente or Languedoc

Ask yourself why the Dordogne is known as Dordogneshire, you say its because lots of brits are there, then ask why
its because its beautiful, I have lived all over France so I can say this
The Charente Maritime may be on the coast but its flat, bland and boring
Rediculous post"

Now, mild person as I am, I take a great objection to your post, K.

You clearly do not understand the teasing nature of my original post.  I daresay the subtlety of calling the Dordogne "Dordogneshire" has escaped you.

The parallel is drawn to a work by John Mortimer (the famous writer, yes?) who coined the phrase "Chiantishire" for Tuscany many years ago when Brits started moving there for its beauty and quality of life.  Therefore "Dordogneshire" is a tongue-in-cheek, shorthand way of signalling an area south of here which is popular with British expats.  The effect is meant to be light-hearted and slightly cheeky.

Where did I say that the Charente Maritime is "more beautiful" than the Dordogne?  If you must make these accusations, at least take the trouble to read my post carefully and check what I actually said before levelling these unfounded allegations.

And, although the Charente Maritime is called that, its older name was the Charente Inferieur (inferior as in the "lower end" of the Charente river).  If you do know it as well as you claim (or do you mean you have once spent a day in La Rochelle?), you will realise that it isn't all "flat, bland and boring" or indeed is all of the area on the coast.  Actually, my own village is inland and I'm not even near the sea.  In fact, I have to drive some hour or more before getting as far as the estuary, nevermind the sea.

I accept the fact that you have every right to your opinion of my post.  More than that, I will defend your absolute right to rubbish what I say.  But, PLEASE, if you have to call my post "ridiculous", have the grace to spell the word correctly.

And whilst I'm at it, why don't you leave the grown-ups to their discussions, eh?  Infantile types trying to interrupt a perfectly interesting conversation amongst adults can prove so vexing.................(big sigh)

 

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[quote user="gardengirl "]

Sweet 17 wrote:

''GG, when did you last go to a dinner party or indeed any social gathering which is attended by Brits?

Believe me, they talk of nothing else in West London.''

We don't go to dinner parties - haven't for years. But we have meals with people and take part in various social activities both in UK and France. I repeat, we've not come across anyone discussing house prices. I exclude our son, who is about to move house; he obviously discussed prices of houses he was interested in.

The little french town where our apartment is situated gets quite busy on Saturdays, when a very popular market is held. Many British people come to it, amongst many other nationalities - and it was almost as busy as in high summer last weekend - but even in the busy cafe in the market square, where we hear quite a lot of English voices, I can't recall anyone discussing house prices.

Jo

[/quote]

GG, I will have to househunt in your area!  Sounds enchanting.

BTW, hope all goes well with you and your OH!

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[quote user="Hoddy"]

I don't talk about house prices to my friends and neighbours in England or the Dordogne.[/quote]

The only Brits I've encountered in the last two weeks were sitting next to me at a table in the main piazza in Siena and for 20 minutes their conversation was exclusively speculation as to how much an apartment overlooking the piazza would cost.  ("Must cost a bomb", "Such a good investment", "You could rent it out for a fortune during Palio")  So for some Brits it's not just their own house, their friend's house, it's ANY house! 

  

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Thanks, sweet 17, all goes very well with G and me.

You'd be very welcome down here for a holiday or more! It won't suit everyone, but we love the little towns and villages and the garrigue all around. Local people are very friendly and helpful, and the weather mostly good. It was a joy to have breakfast and lunch outside for all but 2 days in the last 3 weeks. 

Best regards, Jo

PS I don't know the Charente Maritime very well - definitely visited La Rochelle while staying near St Jean des Monts around 25 years ago, and thought the area was lovely.

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We bought in the Dordogne just because we love the area.  We have travelled all over France in the last 25 years and the Dordogne is somewhere we love and where we feel 'at home'.  The only other place we would have considered buying is Burgundy.  We don't look at either of our houses as 'investments' but as our homes.  Both were bought because we loved the houses and their settings - and both were bought for the long term.  Our house in the UK was bought 23 years ago for the grand sum of £48k - its now worth over ten times that - but its value is irrelevant - its simply our home.  Likewise, our home in the Dordogne - the vagaries of the market and its impact on a possible selling price are of no consequence - because we aren't planning to sell.

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[quote user="sweet 17"]

Now, mild person as I am, I take a great objection to your post, K.

You clearly do not understand the teasing nature of my original post.  I daresay the subtlety of calling the Dordogne "Dordogneshire" has escaped you.

The parallel is drawn to a work by John Mortimer (the famous writer, yes?) who coined the phrase "Chiantishire" for Tuscany many years ago when Brits started moving there for its beauty and quality of life.  Therefore "Dordogneshire" is a tongue-in-cheek, shorthand way of signalling an area south of here which is popular with British expats.  The effect is meant to be light-hearted and slightly cheeky.

I accept the fact that you have every right to your opinion of my post.  More than that, I will defend your absolute right to rubbish what I say.  But, PLEASE, if you have to call my post "ridiculous", have the grace to spell the word correctly.

 [/quote]

sweet17, you are indeed a sweetie and a mild person, however .......

although

you use Dordogneshire in a light-hearted and slightly cheeky way it's

also been used for a long time by others in a derogatory and sneering

way, simply because parts are very popular with British people, and it

has worn a bit thin so no wonder that some people become a little

irritated at it's use. Having said that ...... it really is a beautiful

departement and you really should come and explore it further, plenty

of excellent properties on offer at the moment I believe due to the

current economic climate, and if the name Dordogne is a problem you

could always refer to it as The Perigord [:)].

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[quote user="Scooby"]We bought in the Dordogne just because we love the area.  We have travelled all over France in the last 25 years and the Dordogne is somewhere we love and where we feel 'at home'.  The only other place we would have considered buying is Burgundy.  We don't look at either of our houses as 'investments' but as our homes.  Both were bought because we loved the houses and their settings - and both were bought for the long term.  Our house in the UK was bought 23 years ago for the grand sum of £48k - its now worth over ten times that - but its value is irrelevant - its simply our home.  Likewise, our home in the Dordogne - the vagaries of the market and its impact on a possible selling price are of no consequence - because we aren't planning to sell.

[/quote]

My sentiments exactly.

I don't worry about snidy comments referring to "Dordogneshire" - it's pure jealousy as everyone knows it's one of the best regions in France and they don't live there!

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Gemini Man said

sweet17, you are indeed a sweetie and a mild person, however .......

although you use Dordogneshire in a light-hearted and slightly cheeky way it's also been used for a long time by others in a derogatory and sneering way, simply because parts are very popular with British people, and it has worn a bit thin so no wonder that some people become a little irritated at it's use. Having said that ...... it really is a beautiful departement and you really should come and explore it further, plenty of excellent properties on offer at the moment I believe due to the current economic climate, and if the name Dordogne is a problem you could always refer to it as The Perigord [:)].

Oh, so you have sussed me out to be the awkward so-and-so sourpuss that I am!  No matter, on with my questions.

GM, what part of the Dordogne do you recommend?  You see, I know nowt about the area at all.  From just looking at the map, I'd say I'd prefer the southern bit, around Perigeux, Bergerac, etc.

I am a bit nervous of the north because I have heard about the weather in the Limousin and I'd rather not spend half our pension simply on keeping warm.

I might be completely wrong in my assumptions and I would welcome and be grateful for any views that posters can come up with.

It does surprise me that an area that would normally have been a bit out of our price range is suddenly looking such an attractive option.

Please, GM, give me an answer if you see this post.  I could PM you but I don't like to "deranger" people without sufficient reason.





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Sweet - come and live in 49 Maine et Loire ! Beautiful scenery, mild climate (la douceur angevine), stunning chateaux and....leaving the best till last.....nice people ! You can invite yourself to stay with us if you don't know the area and you will see what I mean !

We do have some cold snaps, but it is generally dry and mild. Decathlon do a good line in fleeces ! ! !
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Callie, don't know about 49, but certainly, we started in Brittany with Cote d'Amor, Ile et Villaine and Morbihan. 

Then we "did" Normandy, that is southern Normandy, Orne area.

Then Sarthe area and we came down south in my car (because I wanted to drive) and we adored Saumur (is that 49?) and down the N road to Chaunay and so on down to Angouleme and Cognac, etc.

Then, we had to go back to the UK (dog left with friends) and we couldn't come again.  Next thing I knew, OH came on the plane to Bordeaux and I did say he could buy whatever he fancied and he bought, well, this house...............

Don't actually dislike the house but don't really like it either.  Certainly, the village is not what you'd call picture-postcard stuff and the road past our house thunders with vehicles until quite late in the evenings and start up again really early in the morning.

Apart from that, yes, it's really nice![:D]

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Pardon me for butting-in but I have a feeling that the French property situation is a little different.Ifeel that most sellers will not become desperate to sell.Perhaps a few UK people desperate to get back to the fun of present day British Life.Good saleable houses here in France will sell without too much problem.But the days of crazy prices placed on properties which are sitting by the side of a railway and boardering a moterway are coming to an end because the client will not buy such a property.It is going to be a bumpy ride around the property market...well you all know that....but there are a few safer roads....are  you on them?

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Its quite simple really: in times of shortage of cash the real values of goods will reassert themselves. So, after the stupidity of the housing market in UK and in certain sectors of the French market, things are falling back to their proper level. Those houses in Spain are worth apparently half what they were or perhaps less. Much of the overpriced rubbish on the French market is the same, however many BnQ DIY jobs have been done on it.
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