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Sunday Shopping?


Benjamin
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Sid.

Around my place in the UK it is not the same old traffic on Sundays it is far, far worse, definitely the most congested day of the week since the ban on Sunday trading was lifted, and I dont think that very many of the vehicles are travelling to church! Perhaps the church of retail.

To leave my village on a Sunday it can take me up to 10 minutes to get on the main road which links two medium size towns to the motorway, when I was a child we used to play football safely on that road every Sunday afternoon, the only shops open in those days on Sunday mornings were a village baker, a hardware store and the BLMC parts counter in the main town.

Here in France we have one small supermarket (Simply) and one boulangerie open until 12.30 on Sundays all the big ones are closed, the Champion, all banks insurers and smaller shops are also closed every Monday

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[quote user="Scooby"]Well given that most of the posters on here are early retired's with all the time in the world to plan when to shop, you are probably right teapot & sid.

[/quote]

Sorry, but I managed to plan even when working full time - and I rarely needed to use shops "out of hours".  And I certainly did not shop in my lunch time even when working - I had my lunch, as all sensible workers do! 

I used my freezer sensibly, and planned ahead, but mainly buying fresh products to see me through the week.  And I took my own sandwiches to work as well. Not difficult really.  Even now, when retired, I do not shop at lunchtimes unless it is to avoid the crush at other times, and only on a Sunday when the shop only opens on that day (as does one of our local fruits et legumes).  But I don't need to do so, it only if I wish to patronise them to ensure their survivial.

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[quote user="Judith"][quote user="Scooby"]Well given that most of the posters on here are early retired's with all the time in the world to plan when to shop, you are probably right teapot & sid.

[/quote]

Sorry, but I managed to plan even when working full time - and I rarely needed to use shops "out of hours".  And I certainly did not shop in my lunch time even when working - I had my lunch, as all sensible workers do! 

I used my freezer sensibly, and planned ahead, but mainly buying fresh products to see me through the week.  And I took my own sandwiches to work as well. Not difficult really.  Even now, when retired, I do not shop at lunchtimes unless it is to avoid the crush at other times, and only on a Sunday when the shop only opens on that day (as does one of our local fruits et legumes).  But I don't need to do so, it only if I wish to patronise them to ensure their survivial.

[/quote]

I'm guessing you worked 9 til 5 until you retired and not 8 til 7.30 as I and may of my friends do....  I come over here for long weekends to complete the renovation / decorating etc so weekend (i.e. Sunday) shopping is necessary.  In the UK I am lucky if stores are even open when I'm not at work.  Clearly if you managed to have a full lunch break when you were working...and didn't have a problem with needing to shop in the evenings / on Sundays you had a very cushy job.

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[quote user="Scooby"]

I'm guessing you worked 9 til 5 until you retired and not 8 til 7.30 as I and may of my friends do....  I come over here for long weekends to complete the renovation / decorating etc so weekend (i.e. Sunday) shopping is necessary.  In the UK I am lucky if stores are even open when I'm not at work.  Clearly if you managed to have a full lunch break when you were working...and didn't have a problem with needing to shop in the evenings / on Sundays you had a very cushy job.

[/quote]

No - it was not a cushy job -  I've yet to work only 9-5, and, no, I did not always get a full lunch break, but when I could, I did, a necessary action to keep me going through the day.  I also had several years of temporary work and not knowing when the next job would come along - with all the bills still to be paid - so - cushy? - I don't think so.

Methinks a bit of chip on shoulder is appearing here.

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OK Scooby, what's the problem? Are you working? Are you working 6 days a week? Are you jealous of those of us who are retired or early retired? Didn't you do your homework before coming here... that's probably the problem! Or do you just want people to open bisinesses purely for your selfish convenience? It means that a whole workforce has to give up another day! If you can't buy what you need in the 6 days of the week that the shops are open, many of them until 7pm or 8pm in the evening, then it's a poor show for your planning, and indeed for your lifestyle generally. Are you telling me that you do your jobs at home on a Sunday and need to buy stuff then??? "Bricolage", for example, on a Sunday is definitely frowned on around these parts, and I certainly don't like disturbing the peace on Sundays, including mowing the grass. I hope you're not of those Brits who give the rest of us a bad name!! Why not get a professional to do the renovations or whatever, while you're working? Not many people go to church here but they do have family get-togethers on Sunday; it's one of the things that persuaded us in moving here; family values!

If you want UK with sunshine, why not try Spain?

AND, while I'm on my soapbox, I may be early retired but I've never worked so hard since I arrived here 5 years ago. After nearly 40 years driving a desk, I'm now doing physical labour 5 days a week and loving it. It doesn't prevent me from organising my shopping trips though. Get it all done in a single trip, with a trailer if necessary. 

Sid (Victor M)

 

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I trust you all to have the ability, whether retired or not - to be sufficiently organised not to need to shop 7 days a week!! It is not 'la mer à boire' -

I don't do the washing or ironing on a Sunday either - keep it for sport, nature, resting, family - even though I am a total agnostic. It is really nice an civilised to have a SPECIAL/DIFFERENT DAY

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Well Odile, I too am antagonistic, but I really don't need different days based on rather silly traditions. In fact I much prefer to have Mondays or Tuesdays as my different days.

As for others who want Sunday as a family day, that is the very best reason to encourage Sunday opening.

Perhaps some of you might notice the number of people, often in family groups who do use stores on Sundays when they are open, and it ain't just supermarkets; the numbers are huge, so there is clearly a demand.

Anyway, why the hell should governments have the arrogance to legislate for this kind of thing; it is up to people themselves to make up their minds. if there is a demand, it will be met. And before anyone whinges about the poor workers, protecting their rights is not difficult.

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The idea that Sundays equal family time is rather twee and unrealistic. For some people, Sunday has always been a working day. My mother worked

three Sundays out of four every month of her working life and I am quite sure many students or unemployed people would welcome the chance to work, any day of the week.

For me, Sunday opening does not equate with food or DIY shopping, but being able to pop into a shop on a Sunday out somewhere, and I don't mean a tourist shop.

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[quote user="sid"]

If you want UK with sunshine, why not try Spain?

[/quote]

I can't think of a worse place to holiday (or live) than Spain.  Actually I hate hot weather and prefer to visit France in the shoulder seasons - I'm more than happy to let friends and family use the place in July and August and let them battle with the tourists.  (In fact our main summer holiday this year is in Nova Scotia, Canada...which is a very long way from Costa sunshine and lager.)  Oh and FYI, Scooby is a forty something mother with three teenage kids - who works full-time and often long hours. 

I happen to think that France is so tangled up with regulation that it stifles business - the barring of Sunday trading is just another example.  In any case if you are going to justify it on religous grounds then why Sunday - why not Saturday (for the multiple other faiths...)??

Sunday family get togethers aren't unique to France...we've always had a family Sunday lunch here in the UK..but then we always eat together as a family regardless of the day of the week. 

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Interesting, very interesting to read all your commemts.

yes, I understand it may be annoying not to find the shops open when you need them,especially if you ve been used to sunday opening in your country.

But I think it is a good thing to keep French sunday as it is.

Yes, sunday is still for the vast majority of people a family day, a day of rest.

Time to have a nice meal, have a walk or  a game with the kids, visit family or friends, watch TV, take the dog out, just RELAX ...

Very often the only day when kids can have their parents with them for the whole day.

Wooly, do you really think working on sundays would be a choice for supermarket workers?

People say students could be hired for sundays, etc... But we all know what would happen, the ones who work week time would be asked to work o sundays , at the beginning for double money, but as it would become generalized, it would become just another day and the double pay would disappear................

For God sake, shopping is not our only hobby is it ?

Let us ( re ) discover the freedom to be able to enjoy a real day off , and yesm it may need a bit of organization but le jeu en vaut la chandelle !!!!!

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[quote user="Scooby"]

I'm guessing you worked 9 til 5 until you retired and not 8 til 7.30 as I and may of my friends do.... 

[/quote]

New readers join here and the rest of you do try and keep up!!!!!!!!!!!!

Scooby's made it clear on another thread that her hubby earns squillions from his NHS job for an embarrassingly small number of hours each month.

It's obvious to me that hubby does the shopping whilst Scooby slaves.

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Personal digs like that I really not fair and irrelevant.

My OH also worked regularly on a Sunday for 2/3 of his career- but I still didn't get the urge to shop on a Sunday.

Yes we could say Monday, or whatever day may be better - but it would be impossible to suit everybody! You know I am a total agnostic Woolie, but Sunday it is for whatever reasons- so I'll stick to that. When our new Tesco where we lived in UK until recently, opened with 24/7 opening - we were assured by Tesco bosses that NOBODY would be forced to work night or Sundays- and that these shifts would be covered by students, semi-retired or retired people and other staff by CHOICE. Last year I was in the shop when a lot of staff rumbling was going on. As I had got friendly with a French woman who worked there- she explained they had just got a letter stating that shifts would be given by management and would not be up for discussion, due to the inability to take on enough staff willing to do unsociable hours. Some of the cashiers were furious, some in tears because of special family situation.

Yes there is a demand - BUT.... I went twice to shop at night to see what was going on. Once at 11.30 and once at 2am on return from the airport - both times there were families shopping with young kids- WHY? So sad to see kids dragged along screaming, having tantrums - on a beautiful Sunday - fantastic parks around, lovely countryside, good public transport to get there, swimming pools, etc.  No wonder more UK kids are obese and unfit with shopping being the only sport/hobby so many of them do with their family. VERY SAD.

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[quote user="Clair"]Worth a read:  First Sunday ferry sparks religious row on Scottish island

... the service would bring "things

that terrify parents", including shops opening seven days a week.

[/quote]

We stayed in Stornaway (lovely place, glorious beaches on Harris), in the 70s - and yes, everything did shut on Sundays (except the churches, of course!)  It's the only time I've been left a cold supper instead of the usual hot meal you would expect in those days in B&Bs.  But that was 35 years ago, and times have changed, even in the Highlands ...... 

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[quote user="Benjamin"]

Scooby's made it clear on another thread that her hubby earns squillions from his NHS job for an embarrassingly small number of hours each month.

[/quote]

Now, now Benjamen - jealousy will get you nowhere LOL.  The only shopping OH does is for stuff that has cooking instructions on the back [:)]..or car bits and pieces.

From reading some of the above it seems that people's Sunday activities are dictated by whether the shops are open!  If you are genuinely committed to having Sunday as a family day then the status of the shops should be irrelevant to your choice of activity.......  Self control anyone???? 

As an aside I occasionally have to work Sundays, as does my OH (on call), as does my daughter (works in the leisure industry).  This is life.  We just work around it as a family to make sure we get quality time together...whether it's on a Sunday, Wednesday or a Saturday (or any day in between).  It's not the day of the week that matters it's making the time - whenever that time is.                                                                  

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