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French can't afford bread??


splishsplash

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LES ULIS, France — When their local bakery in this

town south of Paris raised the price of a baguette for the third time

in six months, Anne-Laure Renard and Guy Talpot bought a bread maker.

When gasoline became their biggest single expense, they sold one of

their two cars.

J. B. Russell for the International Herald Tribune

Anne-Laure Renard, a teacher, and Guy Talpot, a postal worker, sold one

car and bought a bread maker to cut expenses. Prices have risen four

times as fast as salaries in France in the last year.

Their combined annual income

of 40,000 euros, about $62,500, lands Ms. Renard, a teacher, and Mr.

Talpot, a postal worker, smack in the middle of France’s middle class.

And over the last year, prices in France have risen four times as fast

as their salaries.

At the end of every month, they blow past

their bank account’s $900 overdraft limit, plunging themselves deeper

into a spiral of greater resourcefulness and regret.

“In France,

when you can’t afford a baguette anymore, you know you’re in trouble,”

Ms. Renard said one recent evening in her kitchen, as her partner

measured powdered milk for their 13-month-old son, Vincent. “The French

Revolution started with bread riots.”

I wish I had their income!

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I wish I had their income too!

Double income and an overdraft and they still can't manage... [blink]

Edit:

[quote]En 2005, le revenu fiscal moyen des ménages lotois s’élève à 26 500 €.

La moitié des 71 300 ménages fiscaux perçoivent un revenu annuel inférieur à 22 000 €. Les écarts de revenus sont parmi les plus faibles de la région. Ainsi, 10 % des ménages les plus pauvres ont un revenu annuel inférieur à 7 600 € alors que les 10 % les plus aisés perçoivent plus de 48 400 €. Source [/quote]

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[quote user="cassis"]She could perhaps save some money by breast feeding.  [I][/quote]

[:-))]

These poor people! [:'(]

Reduced to making their own bread...[:'(] and I bet that in their area, there is only one baker and no supermarket...

I mean, any town outside of Paris is just "la France profonde", isn't it...

These poor people! [:'(]

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[quote user="splishsplash"]
Anne-Laure Renard, a teacher,

[/quote]

And, AFAIAA, teachers receive mutuelle cover for themselves and their children really, really cheaply - at least the teacher who used to live next door to us did for herself and her 2 children.

[quoteuser="splishsplash"]

I wish I had their income!

[/quote]

Gosh, I am not usually someone given to envy but ...

On the other hand they probably have a huge mortgage ... whereas we just have the rent to pay.

Sue

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[quote user="Hoddy"]So what is the current price of a baguette in France ? I paid 89p for a second rate one here in the UK yesterday. [/quote]

Second rate ones are about 80 cents - well they are here in S Morbihan, good quality baguettes are about 1 euro 5 cents and a wholemeal or bran loaf - 300 grammes - are about 1 euro 40.

Sue

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We make our own but a baguette at Intermarche is 80 cents.  However in the Var, at Leclerc near Montauroux we only paid 35 cents per baguette.  Moins cher!

Suey

ps you really can't equate a UK bought baguette to a real french baguette.  No similarity at all!

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[quote user="Russethouse"]How much do you save making your own bread ? We make our own bread but it's because we like it and like to know what is in it.[/quote]

If you buy a cheap bread-maker (€35 at Lidl) and ready-mixed packs (€0.95 for 2 breads at Lidl), it can work out quite cheap.

I buy local flour in 5kg bags for €5.80 (€1.16/kg), from which I can make around 15-18 loaves, add the dry yeast at around €1.75 for 15-18 loaves, plus salt and electricity, that brings a basic loaf at around €0.55.

I bake at home because the village baker is not worthy of the title, because I like to experiment and most of all because I enjoy it [:)]. Saving money comes way down the list![:D]

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[quote user="Scooby"]Sorry - we'd happily give up the french baguette - save a fortune on dental work!!
[/quote]

That's my attitude too Scooby, I can't chew a baguette without getting a sore mouth.

And like Clair, I enjoy baking. I buy imported english flour so mine isn't cheap. But I make it by hand 4 or 5 loaves at a time.

I wouldn't mind giving up the car too, if there was public transport around here.

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These sort of stories are funny but the other side is that people in America may well read them and think them true.

The only thing I have found that has been up and down price wise is diesel. Our bread has gone up once in 8 years by a couple of cents. Our local tax's have gone up by just under 2% this year as has electricity which I think has only gone up once in the last 5 years. The thing is Americans thinking of coming to France for a holiday will first be hit by the exchange rate and then think that the prices have gone up by extreme amounts and simply not bother coming. Mind you the English papers have come out with some outrageous comments about France over the recent years as well (The French having their electricity subsidised by the high prices charged by EDF in the UK comes to mind as a starter).

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[quote user="Quillan"]

These sort of stories are funny but the other side is that people in America may well read them and think them true.

The only thing I have found that has been up and down price wise is diesel. Our bread has gone up once in 8 years by a couple of cents. Our local tax's have gone up by just under 2% this year as has electricity which I think has only gone up once in the last 5 years. The thing is Americans thinking of coming to France for a holiday will first be hit by the exchange rate and then think that the prices have gone up by extreme amounts and simply not bother coming. Mind you the English papers have come out with some outrageous comments about France over the recent years as well (The French having their electricity subsidised by the high prices charged by EDF in the UK comes to mind as a starter).

[/quote]

Nah, Americans are much more focused on the exchange rate and what's going on with the US economy. 

There will be fewer Americans travelling to Europe this year, but it won't be because they're worried about French inflation.  It will be because they're worried about the US recession.

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[quote user="suein56"][quote user="splishsplash"]

Anne-Laure Renard, a teacher,
[/quote]
And, AFAIAA, teachers receive mutuelle cover for themselves and their children really, really cheaply - at least the teacher who used to live next door to us did for herself and her 2 children.

[quoteuser="splishsplash"]


I wish I had their income!
[/quote]
Gosh, I am not usually someone given to envy but ...
On the other hand they probably have a huge mortgage ... whereas we just have the rent to pay.

Sue

[/quote]

Dont forget also that the poor dear has to work 18 hours a week, there are no part time teaching jobs!

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Interesting thread........

We also make all our own bread: mainly to avoid the awful chemical muck in the flour and finished product. asa well as the appalling taste!

Breadmaker?

All done by hand.

Using organic stone milled flour and mainly now, sourdough. Pure flour and water makes the organism (culture) which is used as the leaven.

Also just been experimenting with yeast from beer brewing; what's left after the must has fermented. Just made a batch of soft rolls using Crouch Vale IPA residue: fantastic! Now growing a culture from this for the future.

You can see some of it here: http://s461.photobucket.com/albums/qq332/PercyPee/Sourdough/?start=0

Some used fresh  Baker's Yeast: some used an Italian style Biga starter. Mainly now I use only sourdough starter, 'cos like one or two have already said, I know precisely what's in it!

Made a batch yesterday, sourdough starter "Sponge" made night before. Wholemeal and 15% Rye: comes from the best millers in UK; they use best organic rye grain and mill gently and slowly, using old French millstones: roller milling makes the grain far too hot and changes the composition of the flour.

To its detriment.

http://www.bacheldremill.co.uk/flourproducts.htm

 

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