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EU savings directive and who can certify your documents


mint

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OH has had a letter from Nationwide asking for the usual proof of identity and address.

But, this is the thing that's a bit of a bind:

The letter names an embassy, consulate or high commission or a lawyer or attorney as being suitable to use.

Embassy in Paris obviously too far and even the Consulate in Bordeaux is a bit of a return journey.

Thought we'd just use a local legal bod to save on time and wear and tear generally. Any idea whether to it would be cheaper to use an avocat or a notaire?

Thanks for any suggestions.

 

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I had the same thing from Marks and Spencer Money last year. I wrote back to them and said that I was no where near Paris to find the consulate, and to get anything certified here I would have to go to a notaire and for this I would incur fees. If they were willing to pay that fee, then of course I would forward certified documents.

In reply from them, I was told that they are following HMRC directives. By this directive, they must sent you 2 letters (one month apart) asking for this information. If, after 2 letters, they get no response from you, that's it - no further action. All they are doing is following government guidelines.

Send them a letter asking if they will pay any fees incurred, to get them the information they require and see what you get back [:)]

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Thanks for the replies.

Will try Nell's ploy first.  These people must think we are made of money.  Well, they should know as they are keeping all the loot for their own pensions and refusing to lend it to customers.

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[quote user="JMB"]A notaire will be ok it's part of their job.[/quote]

We regularly ask our local notaires for certified copies of passports/edf bills etc and have never been charged anyhing yet.

Apparently some maires will do certified copying (for free) too, but ours doesn't do it at all.

Sue

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My goodness, what an obliging fellow your notaire must be.

Alas, I don't think we can expect ours to be as accommodating.  OH has already asked Nationwide whether a signature and stamp from the maire will do only to be told "No".

What a pesky thing as I don't really want to spend money to do this.  Makes the damn interest, so called, hardly worth bothering with in OH's account as I am the one who has the money and his account is just in order to make him feel not entirely penniless![:D]

I hate banks and bankers and EU officials who send out directives.....................

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[quote user="Nell"]

I had the same thing from Marks and Spencer Money last year. I wrote back to them and said that I was no where near Paris to find the consulate, and to get anything certified here I would have to go to a notaire and for this I would incur fees. If they were willing to pay that fee, then of course I would forward certified documents.

In reply from them, I was told that they are following HMRC directives. By this directive, they must sent you 2 letters (one month apart) asking for this information. If, after 2 letters, they get no response from you, that's it - no further action. All they are doing is following government guidelines.

[/quote]

I had the same thing from a couple of providers last year also, and basically told them that it was almost impossible to get such copies easily, and I wasn't going to do so, especially since I had moved all my money from them when I came to France.  I got the same reply, they have to ask, and if they do ask twice, after that, they have complied with the rules and don't bother any more.  So, they have to be seen to comply, whilst giving us poor innocent mortals yet more work and worry.  Typical!

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So this is why interest rates for savers are so paltry.  It's so that they can spend the money sending duplicate letters to customers.

Just as well I have asked the Forum, isn't it?  Otherwise, being law-abiding and conscientious people, we would have given ourselves a nice lot of trouble, ringing a notaire, making an appointment, going to his office and paying him to sign our documents.

Thanks for the tip to ignore all such communications, folks.  Now I hate banks and bankers even more than I did................... 

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[quote user="sweet 17"]

My goodness, what an obliging fellow your notaire must be. [/quote]

We have 4 of them and we have had (free) signatures from all of them throughout the 3.5 years we have been here.

[quote user="sweet 17"] Alas, I don't think we can expect ours to be as accommodating. [/quote]

I have a feeling it might not be an option for them. I am almost sure it is a bit like the free 20 minutes you can demand from your solicitors in the UK. As long as they are not physically producing a report or document then the service should be free. We had a fee-free half hour advice session with one of the notaires when we arrived; no charge because he did not need to 'do' anything for us, merely advise us. We asked why there was no charge and his receptionist explained the rules to us. But, being France, perhaps there are local differences; I doubt it though.

Sue

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