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So, it is OK for French men to degrade women but not immigrants seeking a French passport?


woolybanana

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Surely Wooly, you know that this only for someone who acquired French citizenship at some point in their life, not someone who was born French and does not have another nationality. If you are stripped of your citizenship, you have to have another, previous one, to revert to.

Ooops I realise I have used both terms - citizenship and nationality. No doubt somebody will point the error of my ways.[:)]

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Hello Mrs Elephant. I was seriously taking the Mickey out of the double standards on display. Though might argue that they should grant citizenship to as many male chauvinistic pigs as possible as they would fit right it. Indeed, it should be a qualifying test.

Ergo, "What do you think of women?" 

          "They are weak vessels good only for breeding, as decreed by my holy book. I prefer my camels/goats/sheep/male     cousins."

          "Great answer, Kenneth, welcome to France. Have a passeport (sic).

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[quote user="woolybanana"]So, Mrs E, this could not be used as a means to get rid of a certain Hungarian?[/quote]

 

What's with this idea that people only have the nationality of their parent(s)?  You will be telling me next that the Queen is German because her gt gt grandfather (Albert) was born in Germany.[:D]

If we follow approach to its logical conclusion, none of us will be who we think we are!!!

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For a woman, it's bad enough to be lumbered (usually) with the name of her father, only to be changed for the name of her husband. It is possible to acquire our own name (in the UK it is possible at least, where name changes are easy, by deed poll)  but in France, it is such a production, and most of the time, downright impossible.

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[quote user="5-element"]

For a woman, it's bad enough to be lumbered (usually) with the name of her father, only to be changed for the name of her husband. It is possible to acquire our own name (in the UK it is possible at least, where name changes are easy, by deed poll)  but in France, it is such a production, and most of the time, downright impossible.

[/quote]As a man, I have my father's surname and have no problem with that. Perhaps woman should take their mother's surname? My wife who is Swedish uses her both her old surname and mine as a double-barrelled surname. This is common swedish practice. In England over the phone  she often just uses mine as it saves having to spell her Swedish surname.

Of course in Iceland they use the parental firstname together with son or dottir to make the surname.

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[quote user="5-element"]

For a woman, it's bad enough to be lumbered (usually) with the name of her father, only to be changed for the name of her husband. It is possible to acquire our own name (in the UK it is possible at least, where name changes are easy, by deed poll)  but in France, it is such a production, and most of the time, downright impossible. [/quote]

You surprise me, 5-element.  As a woman and the owner of our little French house (in my name only) I had real difficulty getting the powers that be to put everything under my married name in their records, rather than using my maiden name.I understood that legally all French women retained this life-long, even after marriage. You live and learn....[:D]

 

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I have a friend who lived in Switzerland and had one of her daughters there and had a lot of trouble getting the swiss to understand that she wanted her maiden name on the official record, rather than her married name.

Did you manage then KathyF?

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Kathy, sorry if I was unclear, of course it is how you say: "maiden name" forever in France (but "maiden" is still the name of the father - and the only change possible is via acquiring a husband's name. I was referring more to the patrilineal tradition which is prevalent in our culture - and which can be circumvented in the UK (by changing one's name) whereas in France, as a woman you are stuck with either your father's name, or your husband's name.
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I'd have rather had my mother's maiden name, nicer than my maiden name, but that was her Dad's ofcourse. And if my mother had had her mother's maiden name, then that is the one I ended up with now[Www].

I have one friend who has now been married twice. She has always kept her own name, but her surname is lovely whereas I wouldn't want either of her husband's surnames to be honest.

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