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Some Good News


Bugsy

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[quote user="Frederick"]They will find themselves in prison where the majority of fellow inmates will be black .... Many also Muslim converts ..... Their  worst nightmare .  I imagine they will find out what the inside of the prison hospital looks like pretty soon .
[/quote]  I would hazard a guess that there are more Scousers, Londoners and Scott's in prison than Blacks or Muslim converts, or don't you count them?
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[quote user="NickP"][quote user="Frederick"]They will find themselves in prison where the majority of fellow inmates will be black .... Many also Muslim converts ..... Their  worst nightmare .  I imagine they will find out what the inside of the prison hospital looks like pretty soon .
[/quote]  I would hazard a guess that there are more Scousers, Londoners and Scott's in prison than Blacks or Muslim converts, or don't you count them?[/quote]

I was unable to find results for ethnicity, but out of curiousity:-

Table A1.25 Population in prison under an immediate custodial sentence, by sentence length, religious group and sex.
4 years or more. England and Wales 30 June 2010 (latest figures I could find)

Anglican                   6543
Free Church               383
Roman Catholic        4318
Other Christian         1207
Buddhist                     460
Hindu                         119
Jewish                          80
Muslim                     3471
Sikh                           189
Other religions            156
Non recognised          115
No religion               6466
Not recorded             178
Total                    23,685

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They've been given a minimum of just over 14 and 15 years in prison before they can be considered for parole.

Apparently they have been sentenced in line with their ages at the time. I don't think that's right - they've had all those years to give themselves up.

Two down, three at least to be tried.

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 There may well be more scousers  . Londoners and Scotts in prison ...throughout the UK... But in the London area  some prisons are almost  black only prisons . Diane Abbott MP  has made this fact and the conversion rate among black prisoners to Islam a cause for concern .  Perhaps they will be kind to these two and send them well out of London where they will not have to serve a sentence  mixing  with those they dont like ....

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[quote user="gardengirl "]They'll probably be put on the sex offenders' wing, having no contact with general prisoners.[/quote]

Listening to LBC today, even if they go there, there are "ethnic" prison warders who won't be so sympathetic.

Racism cuts both ways.

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If this is the 3rd time they have been tried, and twice found not guilty, how many times is the state allowed to commit an accused to trial? Ad infinitum?

When I did law at Uni, it was double indemnity, Magna Carta, and all that. Bit out of touch now. Has the law changed? Has it been applied retrospectively in this case?

 

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They have only been tried by the state once before. The second one was a private prosecution.

The double jeopardy law was changed a few years ago. I cannot remember all the details although there was another case of a campaigning mother whose daughter had been murdered by her husband which brought double jeopardy into disrepute. I think the more sophisticated use of DNA also had something to do with it.

Hoddy
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''The government's law reform advisers recommended reform of the double jeopardy rule , and the law was changed in the Criminal Justice Act 2003. That legislation says the court of appeal must order a re-trial if there is new and compelling evidence and it is in the interests of justice for an order to be made.''

 .guardian. double-jeopardy-change-law-retrial?

 

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[quote user="breizh"]

If this is the 3rd time they have been tried, and twice found not guilty, how many times is the state allowed to commit an accused to trial? Ad infinitum?

When I did law at Uni, it was double indemnity, Magna Carta, and all that. Bit out of touch now. Has the law changed? Has it been applied retrospectively in this case?

 

[/quote]

In the UK its call double jeopardy and was abolished under the Criminal Justice Act 2003 and became law (or rather removed from law) in 2005.

The original reason for this law was to basically stop the police from continually attempting to prosecute somebody till they got the result they wanted. Under the new system they still can't do this. The Crown Prosecution Service can apply, giving good reason, (normally it's 'in the public interest') to the Director of Public Prosecutions for the case to be retried. If he/she believes it is in the 'public interest' then a retrial can take place.

In this particular case the reason was because of new technology (namely enhanced DNA testing) that was able to prove the accused were actually there which they couldn't do before.

Just as slight technical correction they were only tried once by the CPS and again by a civil action, the two are quite separate under law.

As to these two animals it is my personal believe than not only should they have got the 'tariff' as it was at the time of the murder but the time from the original prosecution to this one should be added to the total time to be served.

If I were the alleged other culprits I would be very worried. I have heard that one of those convicted may turn 'Queens Evidence' but we shall see.

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Very interesting detail in the full summing up; they were not necessarily guilty of the fatal blow, but, for the intent of a racist attack which resulted in Stephen Lawrences death, which I presume would remove success of appeal should another be found guilty of the fatal blow.  .telegraph.co.uk/ /Stephen-Lawrence-Mr-Justice-Treacys-sentencing-remarks-in-full
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[quote user="Quillan"][quo

If I were the alleged other culprits I would be very worried. I have heard that one of those convicted may turn 'Queens Evidence' but we shall see.

[/quote]

I take it this was someone in your local bar or tabac who imparted this information?

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[quote user="NickP"][quote user="Quillan"][quo

If I were the alleged other culprits I would be very worried. I have heard that one of those convicted may turn 'Queens Evidence' but we shall see.

[/quote]

I take it this was someone in your local bar or tabac who imparted this information?

[/quote]

Not at all but somebody who has strong links with those involved in the case. Actually whilst typing this the BBC news is on in the background and has just confirmed what I said.

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[quote user="NickP"] I take it this was someone in your local bar or tabac who imparted this information? [/quote]

If you read between the lines of this quote,

What detectives hope is that facing a long jail sentence the men – Dobson in particular – may provide new evidence that they could pursue . . .

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/jan/04/dobson-norris-murder-stephen-lawrence

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