Jump to content
Complete France Forum

Which font?


mint

Recommended Posts

I am preparing some headings with our new address details to use in letterheads and compliment slips, etc.

OH has done a little drawing of our house and our local (very distinctive) church and I am to supply the "writing".

At his age, I have to indulge him or resign myself to his not being able to remember our new address and then what happens if he gets lost and can't tell someone where he lives?[:-))]

Any suggestions, anyone, as to which font type?

I'd prefer to have a slightly forward-sloping one which is easy on the eye.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have a look here:

http://www.dafont.com/

Most are free to download and use. I use it all the time.

I'd avoid using a script font, as you want it to be easily and quickly read. Personally, I'd go for an oldstyle font (like Times, but not times) as it's classic and easy on the eye (especially in print). Something like Optimus. Avoid ones which are names of cities like Helvetica or georgia, they are designed for screen use rather than print.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="cooperlola"]I like Garamond.   Not as common as Times but elegant and simple nonetheless.  As a rule, I prefer serif typefaces (the ones with the little tops and tails on) and think they're clearer.  Sorry, forum![/quote]

Précisément Coops, and there so many to choose from, but a couple more of my favourites,  Bembo italic with oldstyle figures and   Century italic with oldstyle figures (not age related Sweet!)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like Calibri for the uncluttered look, good for emails.

Eurostile for a modern squared off finish, but Lucida Bright is a nice one with serifs.

Mine all came with my MS Office package years ago.

EDIT One drawback with the sans-serif fonts is that uppercase "I" and lowercase "l" are often indistinguishable, as on this forum (!) so for addresses and important information a serif font probably works best (Like Times etc).  This line should have said uppercase "eye" and lowercase "ell"!! Perfect demonstration then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="sweet 17"] Oh, JJ, I forgot that you are a bit of an expert n'est-ce pas?

(But, why are you whispering?) [8-)]

[/quote]

An expert is someone who knows more and more about less and less[:D]

Most people choose a face by their own likes and dislikes, but in reality they are more like clothes in style.
eg serif faces have time to be decorative and express character, think Designer formal suit,
whereas sans faces are strictly functional, think forces uniform or overalls; 
For example Johnston is the sans fount designed for the London underground signage,
to be simple, clear, with almost no time given to decoration or character.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="cooperlola"]But of course, everybody knows that San Seriffe is an island group.....[/quote]

Oh, I LOVE that, Coops.  A really nice, CLEAN joke!

Anyway, just had a nasty thought....hey, everybody, come back with your advice, SVP!

There is a very French acute accent in the name of our village, so any font will have to take that into account!

Fortunately, it's not over a capital letter, it's just  "é".

If I choose a font and use Type French Characters, I suppose, the é will come out all right? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="just john "][quote user="sweet 17"] Oh, JJ, I forgot that you are a bit of an expert n'est-ce pas?

(But, why are you whispering?) [8-)]

[/quote]

An expert is someone who knows more and more about less and less[:D]

Most people choose a face by their own likes and dislikes, but in reality they are more like clothes in style.

eg serif faces have time to be decorative and express character, think Designer formal suit,

whereas sans faces are strictly functional, think forces uniform or overalls; 

For example Johnston is the sans fount designed for the London underground signage,

to be simple, clear, with almost no time given to decoration or character.

 

[/quote]

Serif fonts are almost always used in books and items with lots of text in. They help the eye identify the type more efficiently and quicker than a sans serif font.

I don't think this will be an issue with an address though.

Also, another hint, generally, never use more than two different font styles on a design. Anymore than two makes it look very confusing, and you lose the focal point.

Thinking about it, two contrasting fonts could look neat for your design, sweet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sweet, Any of the TTF (True Type Fonts - they're the ones normally supplied with Microsoft stuff), should have the additional symbols to allow typing of accents.

Did you know that with Windows 7 and a UK keyboard you can insert the accented characters without using special keyboard software? For example to type "é" (acute) you press the "AltGr" key and the "e".   For "è" or "à" (grave) press the key at the top left of the keyboard (it usually has 3 symbols on it including a grave accent) and then the "e" or "a".   For "ç" (cedilla) press AltGr and "c".   For  "ô"  "î"   (circumflex) press AltGr and the top row 6 key then the "i" or "o".   They may be some others but those are the ones I use most frequently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, liked Coops' Garamond and Richard's Trebuchet and got the accents in fine, also got the writing forward slanting.

Then, nothing on the page when I tried printing.  New ink cartridges and I printed a No Claims Bonus cert that the agent sent me so printer working fine.

Is there something else I need to do?

I have tried printing by clicking the printer icon and also tried going through File-Print, etc.

Any suggestions?  PLEASE?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...