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The Price of Bread


NormanH

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[quote user="woolybanana"]I havent got the slightest idea of what bread costs. If he bakes his own, good for him. And if he uses local flour, even better.

Better than having a father who hated Britain![/quote]

Now look here Wooly, Wallace said on TV that his father

loved Britain and that what the DM printed was all lies. Normally, I should

point out, that when politicians go on TV and emphatically say it is a lie it

normally turns out to be true. [;-)]

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[quote user="Hoddy"]Just when you think the Daily Mail can't get any lower .....

Hoddy[/quote]

I take it you haven't read the link in Norman's opening post.

This is all pretty tame stuff. I used to enjoy the old style Labour Party annual conferences (think Michael Foot and the Beast of Bolsover) when you were guaranteed a very unseemly bust up.

Happy days.

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The DM, well, I don't as a general rule, pay attention to anything that they say. Ofcourse in the late 30's this paper was very fond of the Black Shirts and what good chaps they were. I really don't think that their basic politics have changed that much over the last 70 odd years. Just how I feel about the DM!

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Ignoring politics, I too dont know how much bread costs as I havnt bought or eaten it for a few years now, well actually in extreme circumstances I have bought a Lidl sandwich.

A baguette was just under one Euro IIRC and as for a sliced loaf well its nearly 10 years now since I bought one, I do recall there was once a price war and they were selling them as loss leaders for under 10p.

So how much does bread cost now please?

Then I can tell my pote Dave!

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[quote user="Benjamin"]

I used to enjoy the old style Labour Party annual conferences (think Michael Foot and the Beast of Bolsover) when you were guaranteed a very unseemly bust up.

Happy days.

[/quote]

Those old imperial politicians like Foot were much better than Milliband the other metric lot[:D]

 

 

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[quote user="nomoss"]

Those old imperial politicians like Foot were much better than Milliband the other metric lot[:D]

 

 

[/quote]

nice one, nomoss.  I need a laugh as it's been an over-busy day for me.

This afternoon, we went to tank up at LeClerc and they had one of these laundromat thingies in their car park.  The name was "SpeedLav"; don't know who thinks these names up.  And OH said, well that'll be OK if you need the loo in a hurry and I had to laugh at that as well!

 

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[quote user="nomoss"][quote user="NormanH"]Well a lavatory is a place where one washes...from lavo lavare....

[/quote]

But "speedlav" is still quite funny, non?[:)][/quote]

They are obviously taking the p**s. And the rest.

(Sorry, but I was sure that someone was setting up that punchline and I thought that I might as well be the one to deliver it)

Apologies - I am using Chrome and it keeps screwing up the posts with HTML gibberish.
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Getting back to the original thread for the moment.

I don't care if the PM knows the price of bread or not, I hope he has bigger things to worry about.

This story smacks of years ago when Ted Heath? was asked about the price of a pint of milk and didn't know.  After that, all the polititians had an army of 'Researchers' briefing them on such triva before being wheeled out in Public.

I would be more interested in 'What is the true cost of Trident?'

Not that I get a vote in the UK anyway [:(]

 

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[quote user="NormanH"]Yes speedlav is hilarious to Anglophone ears, but I doubt that many French people with the exception of Clair 5e and ericd would know the implicaions of "lav"
After all a lavarie  is a place to do the washing...
[/quote]

It definitely means something to Anglophones, but how many Francophones understand "speed" in this context?

I was reminded of some very small, bright yellow road cleaning machines, with a rotating brush and a suction device, which the local council had in Spain.

Early in the morning one could see a line of about ten or twelve of these creeping their way to town from where they lived overnight, holding up the morning traffic rush.

On the back and sides of each was emblazoned, in large black letters "MADVAC"

 

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Oh hell, I only threw that in because I liked your joke, nomoss.

Actually OH is a bit up and down on a day-to-day basis and is nearly himself some days but definitely a bit "off colour" others.  So, perhaps, I lauged at his joke to make him feel better. 

It was just good that he's retained his mental capabilities (which are normally considerable) and you know how it is, you laugh at your OH's jokes and he (or she) laughs at yours and that's just a way of saying to each other, yeah, OK, you're still good for me and you make me laugh and I still like your company. 

At least that's how I interpret things quite often......especially in these uncertain times for us.

Even on its own, it's an OK sort of joke for me...not brilliant or original but brings up a smile and it was a day full of stress and tension.

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[quote user="You can call me Betty"]The big, purpose-built transit buses that used to ferry passengers from aircraft to terminal at Algiers airport bore the name " ENEMA" across the front. I wonder who thought that was a good idea.[/quote]

Surely the pilots weren't that bad Betty?

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