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What should Ed Balls do now?


woolybanana

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He was defeated at the last election and has announced that he is giving up politics, which will doubtless cause many sane people to let out of a sigh of relief. However, he is currently technically unemployed, a house father, living off his wife and a chunk of money he got for being kicked out of parliament. Oh, and no doubt renting out his London pad if his wife is not using it.

What future employment would be suitable for him, I wonder? Any thoughts, guys?

My contribution would be City Tour Guide where he can learn a set patter, add to his knowledge as needed to enrich his guests. And where he can tell fairy stories to his heart's content.

Or even learn to sell crockery on the markets - he has the patter already; the only difference is that nobody ever believes those guys so he should fit right in.
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The first thing he has to do is find someone stupid enough to employ him, but as I doubt if he is qualified to do anything useful;  he'll just live off his wife's earnings. The bad news for us is that he'll probably be constantly telling us all how he would have done a better job of running the country than the elected government. Bit like the Scottish Nasty party. [:D]

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[quote user="Department71"]Should be good as a financial adviser. Lots of knowledge and has a way of putting over his view.


[/quote]

Beat me to it although I was going to add "in the City". I never, ever, liked the man. He knew as much about economics as a lemon.

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Quillan

Although, as you know, I don't particularly like wiki, if you care to look at Ed Ball's profile there I would suggest that he is by no means a dumbo in terms of economics.

The result of last election was determined by the fear factor of veering too far to the left because of the SNP. The conservatives played on this and got the vote of the centre. Unfortunately, the only people to benefit from this government will be the mega-rich and those with very little social conscience.

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[quote user="richard51"]Quillan Although, as you know, I don't particularly like wiki, if you care to look at Ed Ball's profile there I would suggest that he is by no means a dumbo in terms of economics. The result of last election was determined by the fear factor of veering too far to the left because of the SNP. The conservatives played on this and got the vote of the centre. Unfortunately, the only people to benefit from this government will be the mega-rich and those with very little social conscience.[/quote]

Getting a degree in anything does not necessarily equate to being intelligent. The man is a slimy little toad, he joined the Labour, Liberal and Conservative clubs at Oxford university because he wanted to cover all bases when he moved into politics.

People voted for the Tories because they trusted them running the economy and they were frightened of Labour going on yet another spending spree. The Tories had also reduced the number of unemployed from 4.09M in Feb 2010 to 2.6M in Feb 2015 (that’s from the BBC by the way).

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[quote user="richard51"]NickP

I agree . A first in PPE from Oxford and a qualification from Harvard doesn't count for much, even though its far better than Mr cameron has achieved.[/quote]

Degrees are only bits of paper that prove that at one time you had the ability to study. Common sense, empathy with ordinary people and the ability  put across a sensible argument to further your beliefs are much better. As for the snipe at Cameron, what's that got to do with Ed Balls being a totally unlikable character by the electorate. Cameron like him or loath him is a winner, Balls is a loser, thank goodness.

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 The man could end up doing lots of things. I can think of far worse than him at the moment, so why have a go at him in particular.

He is, as has been pointed out dead clever and I'm sure, as he has been politican so long, will use that tricky brain, which all of them seem to have, or develop, to find himself a job.

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[quote user="Quillan"]

[quote user="richard51"]Quillan Although, as you know, I don't particularly like wiki, if you care to look at Ed Ball's profile there I would suggest that he is by no means a dumbo in terms of economics. The result of last election was determined by the fear factor of veering too far to the left because of the SNP. The conservatives played on this and got the vote of the centre. Unfortunately, the only people to benefit from this government will be the mega-rich and those with very little social conscience.[/quote]

Getting a degree in anything does not necessarily equate to being intelligent. The man is a slimy little toad, he joined the Labour, Liberal and Conservative clubs at Oxford university because he wanted to cover all bases when he moved into politics.[/quote]

I very much doubt that anybody  getting entry to Oxford, Cambridge or any of our major universities could reasonably be described as being unintelligent. Indeed I would be surprised they were not all well above average intelligence. It is a long standing tradition at Oxford and Cambridge for undergraduates to be members of many political clubs. They feel it is best to learn about the different parties direct from the source. Many conservative MPs will have done the same thing.

[quote user="Quillan"]People voted for the Tories because they trusted them running the economy and they were frightened of Labour going on yet another spending spree. The Tories had also reduced the number of unemployed from 4.09M in Feb 2010 to 2.6M in Feb 2015 (that’s from the BBC by the way).

[/quote]In many cases the reduction was a result of people moving onto zero hours contracts where they continued to receive benefits so the reduction is not as dramatic as you make it appear. But perhaps this did not reach the south of France[:)]
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[quote user="Rabbie"][quote user="Quillan"]

[quote user="richard51"]Quillan Although, as you know, I don't particularly like wiki, if you care to look at Ed Ball's profile there I would suggest that he is by no means a dumbo in terms of economics. The result of last election was determined by the fear factor of veering too far to the left because of the SNP. The conservatives played on this and got the vote of the centre. Unfortunately, the only people to benefit from this government will be the mega-rich and those with very little social conscience.[/quote]

Getting a degree in anything does not necessarily equate to being intelligent. The man is a slimy little toad, he joined the Labour, Liberal and Conservative clubs at Oxford university because he wanted to cover all bases when he moved into politics.[/quote]

I very much doubt that anybody  getting entry to Oxford, Cambridge or any of our major universities could reasonably be described as being unintelligent. Indeed I would be surprised they were not all well above average intelligence. It is a long standing tradition at Oxford and Cambridge for undergraduates to be members of many political clubs. They feel it is best to learn about the different parties direct from the source. Many conservative MPs will have done the same thing.

[quote user="Quillan"]People voted for the Tories because they trusted them running the economy and they were frightened of Labour going on yet another spending spree. The Tories had also reduced the number of unemployed from 4.09M in Feb 2010 to 2.6M in Feb 2015 (that’s from the BBC by the way).

[/quote]In many cases the reduction was a result of people moving onto zero hours contracts where they continued to receive benefits so the reduction is not as dramatic as you make it appear. But perhaps this did not reach the south of France[:)][/quote]

One reason for staying on at sixth form in public schools is to teach you how to 'get into' a top (or any) university and to supply you with the required qualifications. Of course you do need some intelligence to absorb what you’re taught but it does not have to be any greater than the average person. You just have to remember what you’re taught. Being able to remember is not necessarily a sign of ‘super’ intelligence.

Your last sentence shows your arrogance but that’s to be expected. Zero hour contacts have been around for years. Indeed the first time the ONS started to collect data about them was in 2006 although they said (as reported by the Resolution Foundation) that they had been around many years previously but they did not know the quantity of people on them and that their figure in 2006 was probably double in reality because many people didn't like to admit they were on them. During a debate about zero hour contracts during the election run up even the presenter was amazed at how many people said they benefited from them because it is a two way contract leaving people to work when they want. They are very popular amongst students in secondary education apparently for exactly that reason. One could argue that seeing as zero hour contracts first came to light in any serious quantity in 2006 Labour had four years in which to pass any form of legislation they wanted on them, indeed they could have banned them completely had they wanted to.

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[quote user="idun"] The man could end up doing lots of things. I can think of far worse than him at the moment, so why have a go at him in particular.

Because that is what this thread is about

He is, as has been pointed out dead clever and I'm sure, as he has been politican so long, will use that tricky brain, which all of them seem to have, or develop, to find himself a job.

Being "dead clever" is an objective observation, if he was "dead clever" he would have still been a member of parliament, but no he was an arrogant armhole who thought he could brow beat people by lying and trying to be smart. Also he  has now learned the truth that you can't mess with the British voters

[/quote]
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>>Being "dead clever" is an objective observation, if he was "dead clever" he would have still been a member of parliament, but no he was an arrogant armhole who thought he could brow beat people by lying and trying to be smart. Also he has now learned the truth that you can't mess with the British voters<<

I'm not at all sure that he's learned that you can't mess with British voters; he's learned that British voters need more education on what the Labour Party is about, as they got it so wrong by allowing the Conservatives to get in for another term.
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[quote user="Quillan"][quote user="Rabbie"][quote user="Quillan"]

[quote user="richard51"]Quillan Although, as you know, I don't particularly like wiki, if you care to look at Ed Ball's profile there I would suggest that he is by no means a dumbo in terms of economics. The result of last election was determined by the fear factor of veering too far to the left because of the SNP. The conservatives played on this and got the vote of the centre. Unfortunately, the only people to benefit from this government will be the mega-rich and those with very little social conscience.[/quote]

Getting a degree in anything does not necessarily equate to being intelligent. The man is a slimy little toad, he joined the Labour, Liberal and Conservative clubs at Oxford university because he wanted to cover all bases when he moved into politics.[/quote]

I very much doubt that anybody  getting entry to Oxford, Cambridge or any of our major universities could reasonably be described as being unintelligent. Indeed I would be surprised they were not all well above average intelligence. It is a long standing tradition at Oxford and Cambridge for undergraduates to be members of many political clubs. They feel it is best to learn about the different parties direct from the source. Many conservative MPs will have done the same thing.

[quote user="Quillan"]People voted for the Tories because they trusted them running the economy and they were frightened of Labour going on yet another spending spree. The Tories had also reduced the number of unemployed from 4.09M in Feb 2010 to 2.6M in Feb 2015 (that’s from the BBC by the way).

[/quote]In many cases the reduction was a result of people moving onto zero hours contracts where they continued to receive benefits so the reduction is not as dramatic as you make it appear. But perhaps this did not reach the south of France[:)][/quote]

One reason for staying on at sixth form in public schools is to teach you how to 'get into' a top (or any) university and to supply you with the required qualifications. Of course you do need some intelligence to absorb what you’re taught but it does not have to be any greater than the average person. You just have to remember what you’re taught. Being able to remember is not necessarily a sign of ‘super’ intelligence.

Your last sentence shows your arrogance but that’s to be expected. Zero hour contacts have been around for years. Indeed the first time the ONS started to collect data about them was in 2006 although they said (as reported by the Resolution Foundation) that they had been around many years previously but they did not know the quantity of people on them and that their figure in 2006 was probably double in reality because many people didn't like to admit they were on them. During a debate about zero hour contracts during the election run up even the presenter was amazed at how many people said they benefited from them because it is a two way contract leaving people to work when they want. They are very popular amongst students in secondary education apparently for exactly that reason. One could argue that seeing as zero hour contracts first came to light in any serious quantity in 2006 Labour had four years in which to pass any form of legislation they wanted on them, indeed they could have banned them completely had they wanted to.

[/quote]

I think you will find that the selection procedures at Oxford and Cambridge are not just based on the ability to repeat memorised information but that candidates have to demonstrate the ability to think for themselves and in fact demonstrate intelligence

It is rather arrogant of you to accuse me of being arrogant just because I disagree with you.  I actually thought you were better than that and did not sink to personal abuse. It does seem a bit out of character for you.

I appreciate there is a place for zero hours contracts but they are not a miracle cure for unemployment.  IMO the reason Cameron won was because he appeared to be more credible as Prime Minister than Miliband. He also fought a much better campaign tactically than his opponents.

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[quote user="gardengirl "]>>Being "dead clever" is an objective observation, if he was "dead clever" he would have still been a member of parliament, but no he was an arrogant armhole who thought he could brow beat people by lying and trying to be smart. Also he has now learned the truth that you can't mess with the British voters<<

 I'm not at all sure that he's learned that you can't mess with British voters; he's learned that British voters need more education on what the Labour Party is about, as they got it so wrong by allowing the Conservatives to get in for another term.[/quote]

Oh dear; sounds like a quote from another bitter loser, I think the British voters are very aware of what a disaster the Labour party is/was and would be for the future. They have spoken, live with it. Fortunately I can't see them ever recovering, how many votes did they lose to UKIP and the Scottish Nasty party? More chance of the Liberals recovering than the Labour luvvies living in North London rich lands.

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Rabbie wrote:

' IMO the reason Cameron won was because he appeared to be more credible as Prime Minister than Miliband. He also fought a much better campaign tactically than his opponents.'

Think the Scottish lassie did Millibean no favours, especially the end to austerity - we have seen what has happened to Greece with a spend, spend attitude.

Perhaps as well, Labour playing to their union masters with workers having the power - huge pay rises, what would the do for the economy

Denial of the last Labour administration overspending.

The constraints put on the Tories by their LibDem associates - human rights act etc.

For me, the Tories record seemed to be the better choice.

Perhaps as well, who knows apart from those close to him, what Balls is really like but for me he did not come across very well.

Time will tell.
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[quote user="NickP"][quote user="gardengirl "]>>Being "dead

clever" is an objective observation, if he was "dead clever" he would

have still been a member of parliament, but no he was an arrogant

armhole who thought he could brow beat people by lying and trying to be

smart. Also he has now learned the truth that you can't mess with the

British voters<<

 I'm not at all sure that he's learned

that you can't mess with British voters; he's learned that British

voters need more education on what the Labour Party is about, as they

got it so wrong by allowing the Conservatives to get in for another

term.[/quote]

Oh dear; sounds like a quote from another bitter

loser, I think the British voters are very aware of what a disaster the

Labour party is/was and would be for the future. They have spoken, live

with it. Fortunately I can't see them ever recovering, how many votes

did they lose to UKIP and the Scottish Nasty party? More chance of the

Liberals recovering than the Labour luvvies living in North London rich

lands.

[/quote]

Not at all a bitter loser - I was being ironical, but you obviously

didn't understand that. I was writing what I feel many Labour MPs,

ex-MPs and the hierarchy of the Labour Party believe went wrong.
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We can only draw conclusions from what we read in the press on why Labour lost. The only thing we really know is the SNP hurt Labour a lot. You really have to ask new voters and those that previously voted Labour but voted Tory this time why. It's difficult for me to explain but I hear Labour MP's saying that they need to change Labour to make it more appealing to the middle class. It seems they are saying they will change their party just to get a vote and get in to No 10 then after that f*ck the lot of you. Whilst the Tories understood the electorate they didn't completely understand them but it was enough to give them a win. I read in one of the papers today that Labour has removed its objection to a referendum on the EU. This is not standing by their principles it is pandering to the minority of people in the hope of gaining a vote or two. The split of Labour from the Trade Unions will leave the manual working person with no political representation regardless of what you may think of the unions.
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"Not at all a bitter loser - I was being ironical, but you obviously

didn't understand that. I was writing what I feel many Labour MPs,

ex-MPs and the hierarchy of the Labour Party believe went wrong"

Oh I see, it wasn't me;  it was the bigger boys miss, they did it and run away. [Www]

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[quote user="Quillan"] I read in one of the papers today that Labour has removed its objection to a referendum on the EU. This is not standing by their principles it is pandering to the minority of people in the hope of gaining a vote or two. [/quote]Or it could be interpreted as respecting the wishes of the electorate - a majority of whom voted for parties wanting a referendum. The longer the referendum is delayed the more damage the uncertainty about the eventual result will do to the British economy. Once Cameron has completed his renegotiations then the sooner we end the uncertainty the better.

I am not a labour supporter, I would rather there was not a referendum but there will be so lets have it once the new terms are known.

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[quote user="Rabbie"]

The longer the referendum is delayed the more damage the uncertainty about the eventual result will do to the British economy.

[/quote]

Whilst I disagree with the rest I have to totally agree with that comment. We need to get it over and done with and move forward within the EU.

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[quote user="Quillan"][quote user="Rabbie"]

The longer the referendum is delayed the more damage the uncertainty about the eventual result will do to the British economy.

[/quote]

Whilst I disagree with the rest I have to totally agree with that comment. We need to get it over and done with and move forward within the EU.

[/quote]And I completely agree with this comment of yours. Peace?
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