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A really rough Ferry crossing


Monika

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Reminds me of a crossing from St Malo to Portsmouth in 1979. One passenger nearly got washed overboard from INSIDE the restaurant. A ship foundered further down channel the same night and part of Torcross, in Devon, got washed away.

January 4, 1979 - Torcross, Start Bay, Devon. "300 evacuated as huge seas pound village". The Daily Telegraph, Friday, January 5, 1979, by Gerald Bartlett. "Nearly 300 distraught and shivering Devon villagers wre being evacuated from their homes last night as mountainous seas propelled by force nine gales smashed through walls and windows, reducing some buildings to rubble and floating planks of wood. As villagers in the South Devon resorts of Torcross and Bessands battled with "the worst sea storms and onslaught in living memory" the morning high tide picked up massive boulders in 30 ft waves and hurled them at the helpless seas communities.

I was in mid-channel during that little lot!
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I was on a crossing one time and it was so rough the fire extinguishers went off by themselves. Kids were being sick left, right and centre, and in some cases all three at the same time. One of the crew told the kids that if they managed to fill up a sick bag he would buy them an Orangina. It took four of them, but they did it. Paul Snowshall spilled some beer - I don't suppose any of you know Paul Snowshall, but if you did you would know how extreme the conditions actually were...

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I am sure I am not breaking the Official Secrets Act here........ MOH used to be in the RN. He worked at the front of the ship on the big gun thingy!!. He suffered terribly from seasickness!. It was so bad he used to go to work with a bucket round his neck!! After 16 years he discovered the cure - have a decent breakfast!! He never had a problem after that with being seasick.
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Rumour has it that only-one-of-everything Lord Nelson suffered mightily from seasickness though I have no idea whenther he needed a bucket round his neck.

In view of the subject title I keep expecting K Williams to contribute.

John

not

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I crossed from Calais to Dover on the day the Fastnet race was in ruins due to high seas, some years ago. The inside of the ship stank of vomit, so I went OUTSIDE. I got soaked by waves breaking over the top, but nothing else.

The scariest bit was that the ship hit the harbour wall while trying to turn round after entering the harbour at Dover. Knocked a few folk over inside!

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I spent 5 years of my youth in Dover and know what channel seas can do especially in the winter months. My view is unless you are an excellent sailor and can stand the stench of vomit, then leave the Ferry's to brave between October and March. At least one has the shuttle  even with its drawbacks for winter months and there are reasonable fares available with a little planning.

Baz

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Many years ago Dieppe to Newhaven ..crew came round putting sick bags on the tables prior to departure .... and they announced over the tannoy that "We are going to experience a very rough  crossing and any person wishing to leave the ship to come forward and they could do so "   never heard that before or since ... It was rough...very ....and at Newhaven  crowds were lined up on the shore watching to see if we would get in through the harbour entrance . I recall my son trying to lean into the wind on the deck at about 45 degrees arms outsreatched and saying it was holding him up.   
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[quote user="Mayennaise"]After 16 years he discovered the cure - have a decent breakfast!! He never had a problem after that with being seasick.[/quote]At the risk of sounding revolting from personal experience on small boats I can't say that breakfast prevents SS but if there is a risk of it then you should eat something at least an hour beforehand and the best thing to have is a nice greasy fry up - easy in easy out - and drink plenty of milk after the first bout, nothing worse than dry retching.

Another tip is to stay as near to the roll center of the ship as possible but at all costs keep a view of the horizon.

Another slightly off topic tip for car sickness with kids in the back. Remove the front headrests and make sure the kids are sitting high up enough to see out of the front of the car.

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Just had a look at the video clip - LUVELY!!!  Reminds me of being on the old SS Uganda heading for the Falklands - the bow used to disappear under the waves and you wondered if it was going to keep going down or whether it would ever come up again!

[quote user="Mayennaise"]After 16 years he discovered the cure - have a decent breakfast!! He never had a problem after that with being seasick.[/quote]

Quite right too - a deckhand on one of my first ships told me that it is true - the greasier the better!  It was great sport on the Uganda when we were taking troops to the Falklands.  Sit down to breakfast with a group of army officers and order the full works - set us up perfectly for the day but we would watch as each turned green in turn and made their excuses for leaving the table - and I thought they were suppose to be real men!

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[quote user="Coco"]

Just had a look at the video clip - LUVELY!!!  Reminds me of being on the old SS Uganda heading for the Falklands - the bow used to disappear under the waves and you wondered if it was going to keep going down or whether it would ever come up again!

 

[/quote]

I went on a cruise on the Uganda, for fun! Along with another ship (forget the name) it was used for educational cruises, in my case to Algeria. I can remember that going through the Bay of Biscay was not a happy experience. Nowadays I have problems getting from the Isle of Wight to Portsmouth!

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[quote user="KathyC"][quote user="Coco"]

Just had a look at the video clip - LUVELY!!!  Reminds me of being on the old SS Uganda heading for the Falklands - the bow used to disappear under the waves and you wondered if it was going to keep going down or whether it would ever come up again!

 

[/quote]

I went on a cruise on the Uganda, for fun! Along with another ship (forget the name) it was used for educational cruises, in my case to Algeria. I can remember that going through the Bay of Biscay was not a happy experience. Nowadays I have problems getting from the Isle of Wight to Portsmouth!

[/quote]

It's a ship that lots of people of a certain age rmember from their school days.  I can remember thinking that at last I had made it on board when I was working on her (my parents could never afford to send me on the school cruises). It was having all those kids dormatories already kitted out that made it so perfect as a troop ship,  ooooh me, the nurse and 900 squaddies, what memories! [:$]    I was also on her final trip back to Falmouth which was very sad.  One of the last "true" cruise ships with lots of brass, wood panelling, beautifu etched glass doors, and (are I say it) huge elephant tusks in the doorway to the restaurant.  Happy memories... especially of those South Atlantic storms!![;-)]

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