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Tins of paint in checked baggage?


dave21478

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Hello,

Just wondering if these would be allowable on Ryanair flights....I have looks through the "prohibited items" list and paint isnt specifically mentioned.

Its slightly specialised stuff that is 1/3 of the price in UK than here, so its well worth my while, IF I can bring it back.

Do we think this would be allowed? and would it be a sensible idea? As I typed this a thought occured - the paint will have been sealed in the tin at ground level, so will be at normal atmospheric pressure, but when in flight if the hold isnt pressurised, the outside pressure will be lower....would this be enough to pop the lids off the tins?

 

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Absolutely NOT Dave !

Please note that I am trained in the transport of dangerous goods both by sea and air so speak from a position of authority on this subject !

Flammable liquids and paints are specifically prohibited by IATA (International Air Transport Association) DG regulations and you could get into extremely serious trouble if you tried it. Don't forget that hold baggage is scanned behind the scenes and it would almost certainly be picked up.

Below is a list of prohibited items and you will see that flammable liquids and paints are specifically mentioned. 

For safety reasons dangerous goods as defined in the IATA

Dangerous Goods Regulations, such as those listed below shall not be

carried in or as passenger checked or carry-on baggage.

  • briefcases and security type attaché cases with installed alarm

    devices; or incorporative lithium batteries and/or pyrotechnic

    material;
  • explosives, munitions, fireworks and flares;

  • gases (flammable, non-flammable, deeply refrigerated and poisonous) such as camping gas and aerosols;

  • flammable liquids such as lighter fuels, paints and thinner;

  • flammable solids, such as matches and articles which are

    easily ignited; substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances

    which on contact with water emit flammable gases;
  • oxidising substances (such as bleaching powder and peroxides)

  • poisonous (toxic) and infectious substances

  • radioactive materials;

  • corrosives (such as mercury which may be contained in thermometers, acids, alkalis and wet cell batteries);

  • disabling devices such as mace, pepper spray, etc. containing

    an irritant or incapacitating substance are prohibited on the person,

    in checked and carry-on baggage;
  • Magnetised materials and miscellaneous dangerous goods as listed in the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations.

  • Personal medical oxygen devices that utilise liquid oxygen are prohibited on the person, in checked and carry-on baggage.
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[quote user="dave21478"]Just wondering if these would be allowable on Ryanair flights....I have looks through the "prohibited items" list and paint isnt specifically mentioned.

Its slightly specialised stuff that is 1/3 of the price in UK than here, so its well worth my while, IF I can bring it back.

Do we think this would be allowed? and would it be a sensible idea? As I typed this a thought occured - the paint will have been sealed in the tin at ground level, so will be at normal atmospheric pressure, but when in flight if the hold isnt pressurised, the outside pressure will be lower....would this be enough to pop the lids off the tins?[/quote]

The hold IS pressurised - it would be difficult (from a weight point of view) to keep the cabin floor flat if it were not. However, paint may be classified as a hazardous material for air freight purposes, and if you look at 

http://www.ryanair.com/site/EN/faqs.php?sect=bag&quest=prohibiteditems&xtmc=paint&xtcr=1

 you will see that Ryanair specifically prohibit paint in checked-in or cabin baggage.

Regards

Pickles

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Paint may be transported as freight of course however in this case it will be contained in special IATA approved steel receptacles which allow space for expansion, termed ullage, and will be able to withstand any external pressure changes likely to be encountered even under decompression.

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Dave

Not wanting to encourage you to bring the two pack (I guess) paint amongst your baggage but I do sympathise knowing the relative costs, for me it is a form of illness and I feel physically sick after paying through the nose for the sort of stuff that you are using.

However the following advice is also applicable to other forms of transport [:)]

If you fouine aroud in your garage you will probably find some other old tins (possibly those that you bought mail order) that have 3 spring steel retaining clips around the rim to stop them from opening in transit, if not your paint supplier may well have them. I know from personal experience that paint tins restrained with them can endure enormous internal pressures, shock and vibration.

Best not to risk them on old stock that may be rusted on the bottom though.

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Thanks for the replies...looks like flying it out is a non-starter.

I am currently looking at courier delivery and have found a place that should send it from uk to france for about £30....but again, im unsure if paint is allowed. The websites list of prohibited items says "fluid" is not allowed, yet further on, there is a list of things that can be sent, but wont be insured and are at your own risk and it says "paint". I have emailed them and am awaiting a clear reply.

Yes JR, its2k paint....170€ for 4 litres here, plus the cost of hardner and thinners. I can get 5 litres, plus hardner and thinners for £70 total in uk. [:@]

I doubt if the courier will take the thinnners, but if they will take the paint and hardner, I can buy the thinners locally and still make significant savings.

 

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Your problem will still be the paperwork dave.

Whether by air or overland both the paint and the hardener are classed as dangerous goods and as such will have to have to be accompanied by the correct documentation the cost of which will certainly wipe out any savings you stand to make on the actual purchase price of the materials themselves.

A friend or someone going back for a visit would be definitely be your best bet.

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Looks like Ze Germans are coming to the rescue... ebay.de seems to have a few suppliers at similar to uk prices and will deliver to France. Just need to get my online translations double checked incase I end up ordering gassy lager and bratwurst instead.

Why is nothing ever easy here? This hobby is supposed to be fun, but its been nothing but a complete headache from start till finish. It seems this sort of thing is a rich mans game here in France.

 

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You're certainly right about nothing being ever easy.  It all seemed like a bit of a challenge at first but I must admit that, more often than not nowadays, it just seems like a lot of frustration and sometimes it's a downright battle that you know you aren't going to win!  Not nice.
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A friend of mine (who clearly had not read the rules, tsk!) did once take a tub a Farrow & Ball in hold luggage on a flight to southwest France. It was not spotted and confiscated, and arrived at the other end with the lid having popped off and all her clothes a tasteful shade of duck egg blue. Amazingly, it all remained sealed within the case so the carousel was not redecorated as well.
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[quote user="Fay"]A friend of mine (who clearly had not read the rules, tsk!) did once take a tub a Farrow & Ball in hold luggage on a flight to southwest France. It was not spotted and confiscated, and arrived at the other end with the lid having popped off and all her clothes a tasteful shade of duck egg blue.[/quote]

Yes: although the hold is pressurised, the pressure in the hold and cabin is the equivalent of 8000 feet amsl, so assuming the tin was filled at sea level, the pressure difference between the inside of the tin and the surrounding air in the hold would be just under 4 PSI, quite enough to pop the lid off.

Regards

Pickles

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Dave.

You can PM me if you want, I will be be travelling back within the next 2 months for a materials shopping spree which usually includes visiting Maccess and the auto_refinishing suppliers and could bring some stuff over for you.

Alternatively I hae good contacts with a local Lycée professional which specialises in carroserie repairs, they have their own mixing unit with a mass spectrometer colour matching whizzbang, I want to keep any favors in reserve for when I (or perhaps the students) restore my Elan. What I could do is ask the workshop chief where particuliers can buy paint at a resonable price.

Alternatively you could try searching out a similat establishment in your area and offer your services benevolement as I do in talking english to the students, helping out on trips, car rallys etc. If you find one anywhere nar as well equipped as my one you will think that you have gone to heaven.

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Many modern paints are water-based, so are not flammable and would not fall foul of the Regulation quoted.  Just read the label.  However, the way that luggage is thrown around at airports (and that is when passengers can see it, God knows what they do when we can't) you may be risking an almighty mess should the container be damaged or just come open!

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The fact that it is non-flammable is not enough to classify it as non-DG. ALL requirements of the Dangerous Goods Register must be respected. It might be water based but it's formula may contain other components which are corrosive or toxic for instance.

As an absolute rule if the container carries a UN number then that is conclusive evidence that the material has an entry in the DGR and if so then it cannot be transported without complying with the requirements of that entry.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I was wondering about taking a plastic tub of water based varnish, well cling-filmed, and additional precautions against spillage taken. Had assumed that water based would not come under the flammable bit?[8-)]

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I repeat my earlier comments, it's not only about flammability, however, having done a little research it would seem that typically water based paint products are not classified as DG.

e.g. http://www.coo-var.co.uk/pdfs/04410629.pdf and http://www.harris.bb/msds/Varnishes_Water_based.pdf

You may notice that in the second example a UN number, UN1263, is actually quoted and some may see this as contradicting what I said before about UN numbers being conclusive evidence. This is not so and whilst I do not have the regulations in front of me UN1263 is a generic entry for Paint Related Materials and will contain some information about transportation and packaging.

Despite the above there is no guarantee that it won't be picked up as suspicious by the baggage scanner and quarantined so it's up to you if you want to take the chance I suppose. Remember if it is picked up then there is a fair chance that you'll never see the bag again [:(]

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