Jump to content
Complete France Forum

Everyday English words in everyday French


SaligoBay

Recommended Posts

Here are some I hear regularly......

- black (as in travail)

- speed ("il est très speed")

- cool (très cool, trop cool, carrément cool)

- dealer (that's a verb, btw, pronounce it like delay - "il dealait sous le pont de Boisseron", Peter mpprh will recognise this one).

That's enough for a start. 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

dealer (that's a verb, btw, pronounce it like delay - "il dealait sous le pont de Boisseron", Peter mpprh will recognise this one).

I hope you meant that he will recognise the place, not the activity

While we're on drugs (I didn't mean it that way) you get the verb se shooter which you obviously do with le shit.

 black is used to describe black people too c'est un black

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heres a twist on one, Our youngest had her friend to tea, she is learning English in school and asked what the various cutlery items are called, so we did glass, plate,knife ,fork......she gasped and giggled with our youngest and started to whisper...fork is a swear word in french she says whilst showing her fingers! .......try it with a french accent! so that is a french word to I take it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm

I know the bridge. even searched under it to see the roman origins, but didn't know it was famous for other things.

Just a point for SB : the bypass is now open, so you won't go over this bridge on the way to Sommieres (also known for dealing) anymore when coming from the South.

And another point for SB : When did they build the Salinelles bypass ? Just found it this weekend.

Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clean was new to me this summer.

Relax is very popular, and zen (not too sure how English the latter is?!). Le cocooning is in for this season. And of course typically British.

Not to mention the round-baller, big-baller, big-bag and pick-bag.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had a very interesting Sunday lunch last week with a local family at our house.

The show stopper for me was when I started the conversation about swearing that is commonplace for brit youngsters (it would appear to me) nowadays. Turning to their sixteen year old daughter I said do your friends use a lot of swear words to which she said "not really, the only one I use is F@@@".

It almost had me choking on my effing food.

I must add that all four of them speak excellent english and I am glad I know them.

Weedon(53)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a conversation with a young, well educated Parisienne the other day who said nothing else but "o-kaye" or "sooo-pair" (not superb) in reply to everything I said.  So I asked what's this okay and super business and she replied both words are used regularly nowadays, especially okay, that's a really classy exclamation to throw in.  She later came out with "super fantastique".  And to think many of us study French because of it's beauty and rich vocabulary.  M

 

ps: Pucette, what are all these bag references?  Not sure I know what they mean in English.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quite so, hence the confusion... especially as the pronunciation in the first instance gives no clue to the French origins (and indeed the spelling of baller...)

A big-bag is a bag so large you need a forklift truck or equivalent to move it, and typically an odd construction like a silo without a silo to dispense from it with ease...

A pick-bag is a sort of back-to-front rucksack for picking apples into.

Are ok and super loaned from the English? I hadn't noticed, they were in my textbooks over ten years ago...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahh, thank you. And then there's "byebye"... is "chinchin" English? I've only come across it over here... and "cake" is another one, I suppose, but not very tendance...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote]Heres a twist on one, Our youngest had her friend to tea, she is learning English in school and asked what the various cutlery items are called, so we did glass, plate,knife ,fork......she gasped and ...[/quote]

A Northern expression.........

I am from the South of England, but the other day a Northern friend of ours here in Montpellier, said "have you got the Spanners"!!  He! He! He!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, Teamedup, wasn't it the woman in the coulottes who was okaying repeatedly in Les Visiteurs?  This was indication of her social class presumably?  Talking about fashion, coulottes are something you don't see so much of nowadays in France but I used to have several pairs in the 70s/80s, so comfortable, so practical. 

And how could we forget bye bye, even I say that occasionally in French, though never in English funnily.

M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As suspected, found "chin-chin" in Hobson-Jobson.  "In the "pigeon English" of Chinese ports this signifies "salutation, compliments" or "to salute" and is much used by Englishmen as slang in such senses.  Corruption of Chinese phrase ts'ing-ts'ing or Pekingese ch'ing-ch'ing, a term meaning thank you."

M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il est speed.

people

Does "le parking" count?

Does anyone in England say "chin-chin"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you M; perhaps they have an affection for France.

We can use nickel-chrome for emphasis round here. "Il a fait un travail nickel. Nickel-chrome."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cake. Job. Interview (what's wrong with entretien?).

Words to do with computers like mail are more popular than French equivalents like courriel. Start-ups.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can really impress your French friends by using the word feeling (with the emphasis on the "ling", of course).  They use the word to convey a deeply sensitive inner sensation of poetic status.  I was ticked off recently for not giving the word its due gravitas, more along the lines of "Ah fink".

The trouble with these borrowed words when they are nouns is that you can never be sure what gender they should be.

Chico (with feeling)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le look sportif, un jogging et des baskets.

The origins of le talkie-walkie puzzle me.

Le gentleman-farmer. Le tweed.

Le five-o-clock.

I think they're all masculine, or near as dammit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...