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French Special Characters


crépuscule

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I have made up a table of ALT key combinations to make it easier to type in French special characters

e.g. ALT+130 = é.

I have included ALT+148 = ö and ALT+129 = ü but, on second thoughts, I don't think there are any French words that contain these characters. Can anyone confirm this or suggest words that do have these characters?

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[quote]...for the o, there's trapezoide (sorry, can't work out how to put the symbol in), hemorrhoid,  and probably others too.   [/quote]

Sorry to be nit-picking here, but  think actually the two dots would come on the *second* of the vowels, so: trapézoïde, Noël, haïr and so on...

Angela

 

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[quote user="crépuscule"]

I have made up a table of ALT key combinations to make it easier to type in French special characters

e.g. ALT+130 = é.

I have included ALT+148 = ö and ALT+129 = ü but, on second thoughts, I don't think there are any French words that contain these characters. Can anyone confirm this or suggest words that do have these characters?

[/quote]

I like the idea of making up a table because I can never remember the ALT characters. However because I'm lazy I went to look on the web and found this site. I hope it saves you a bit of time.

http://www.starr.net/is/type/altnum.htm

It should also be pointed out these combinations only work if you use the number pad at the right of the keyboard and not the numbers along the top.

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For a UK English keyboard:

 

Character set

 

 

Alt + 133 for à
Alt + 131 for â
Alt + 135 for ç
Alt + 128 for Ç
Alt + 138 for è
Alt + 130 for é
Alt + 136 for ê
Alt + 144 for É
Alt + 137 for ë
Alt + 139 for ï
Alt + 140 for î
Alt + 147 for ô
Alt + 150 for û
Alt + 151 for ù
Alt + 129 for ü
Alt + 164 for ñ

Alt + Ctrl + 4 = €

 


 

à, è, ì, ò, ù

À, È, Ì, Ò, Ù CTRL+`(ACCENT-GRAVE), the letter á, é, í, ó, ú, ý

Á, É, Í, Ó, Ú, Ý CTRL+'(APOSTROPHE), the letter â, ê, î, ô, û

Â, Ê, Î, Ô, Û CTRL+SHIFT+^ (CARET), the letter ã, ñ, õ

Ã, Ñ, Õ CTRL+SHIFT+~(TILDE), the letter ä, ë, ï, ö, ü, ÿ

Ä, Ë, Ï, Ö, Ü, Ÿ CTRL+SHIFT+ COLON), the letter å, Å CTRL+SHIFT+@, a or A

æ, Æ CTRL+SHIFT+&, a or A

œ, Œ CTRL+SHIFT+&, o or O

ç, Ç CTRL+, (COMMA), c or C

ð, Ð CTRL+' (APOSTROPHE), d or D

ø, Ø CTRL+/, o or O

¿ ALT+CTRL+SHIFT+?

¡ ALT+CTRL+SHIFT+!

ß CTRL+SHIFT+&, S

 

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[quote user="Loiseau"]

[quote]...for the o, there's trapezoide (sorry, can't work out how to put the symbol in), hemorrhoid,  and probably others too.   [/quote]

Sorry to be nit-picking here, but  think actually the two dots would come on the *second* of the vowels, so: trapézoïde, Noël, haïr and so on...

Angela

 

[/quote]

You are not nit-picking!  You are quite right..... If I'd worked out how to put them in I would have seen that for myself!

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If you have a PC running WIndoze, you can simply set it up with the English International Keyboard, this allows you to have all the accent characters simply by using the quotation key followed by the appropriate vowel, i.e. áéëçû, etc., etc.  To get the € you simply hit the right ALT key with the 5 key on the main keyboard.

To set up the international keyboard on XP go to Control Panel, choose Date, Time, Lanugage settings, choose Add Other Language, choose the Language tab, then under Text Services and Input Languages click on the "details" button.   You can choose the keyboard you want from there.  You can also install multiple keyboards if you want, then switch between them.  However, I find the international option is the simplest.

PG

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I haven't tried resetting the keyboard so I'm not saying that using the ALT keys is better but I've got used to it now so will probably continue with it. For French, most of the time you only need 4 combinations:

ALT+130

é

ALT+133

à

ALT+135

ç

ALT+138

è

which I can just about remember but I have a crib sheet which sits under my monitor that I refer to for the others:

ALT+131

â

ALT+136

ê

ALT+137

ë

ALT+139

ï

ALT+140

î

ALT+147

ô

ALT+150

û

ALT+151

ù

That's really all you need as you can get away without using special characters with capital letters.

Thanks to everyone for the suggestions for words with ë and ï but so far none with ö or ü! After a quick flick through my Robert, the best I can offer is führer which probably doesn't count.

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If you look in Wikipedia (which I should have done first!) under "French Language", there is a section:

diaeresis or tréma (ë, ï, ü): Indicates that a vowel is to be pronounced separately from the preceding one: naïve, Noël. Diaeresis on ÿ only occurs in some proper names (such as l'Haÿ-les-Roses) and in modern editions of old French texts. Since the 1990 orthographic rectifications, the diaeresis in words containing guë (such as aiguë or ciguë) should be moved onto the u: aigüe, cigüe. Words coming from German retain the old Umlaut if applicable but uses French pronunciation, such as kärcher(trade mark of a pressure washer).

There is no mention of ö which suggests it does not occur. The suggested switch from guë to güe is not reflected in my Robert dictionary (published in 1998).

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I agree, Maggi. I bought a French keyboard and was surprised by how quickly I got used to it.

The problem now comes the odd time that I need to use my wife's laptop, which has a good old QWERTY keyboard. I find it hard to use now, and keep on hitting Q instead of A etc!

Rob

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Or why not visit your friendly computer!!

Go to Start>>All Programs>>Accessories>>System Tools>>Character Map.

There, a bewildering array of characters awaits you for fun and adventure!! From latin to greek to cyrillic to arab to hebrew (depending on how advanced one's own machine is) and many more other little less used characters such as 'copyright' 'registerd mark' 'centigrade' 'micron' 'macro' 'pilcrow' '¿' exponents for maths and algebra ........

Oooh the fun is only just starting!...  Go on adventure and explore the map at a friendly computer near you !!!!!!

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  • 1 month later...
And for Mac users around here:

Press Alt + "something" then the letter you want to modify.

The something is:

` for a grave

e for an accute

i for a circonflexe

u for "deux points"

so for example

é: press Alt+e then e

ë: press Alt+u then e

Only exeptions is for the ç where Alt-c is all you need, Likewise for œ (Alt+q).

This is system wide...

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Ronan

Thank you from a <> frustrated Mac user - now I can type my letters with accents - without having to recourse to typing them in word and using symbol. Mind you, the spell checking is useful esp if you change the language to Fr first!.

PS - when in France I have to use hubby's French keyboard - on a pc - which is a bit like changing between LHD and RHD cars - very confusing! Also as an almost touch typist for almost 40 years, changing keyboards is not quite so easy - its alright for those "one-finger" typists - but more difficult for the professionals amongst us!
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Most welcome, Judith!

Spell-checker is also a blessing! Especially when used in the text field in web browser!

You might also like to check the "Keyboard Viewer" as it might be useful if you switch keyboard often: activate it on the Input Menu tab in Control Panel, it'll show the keyboard (and more importantly the effect of Shift/Tab/) for whichever keyboard language you have active at the time...
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  • 6 months later...

[quote user="crépuscule"]I have just found a word containing ü - un capharnaüm = a shambles.[/quote]

Crépuscule - brilliant !

For the record, if you have Word, you can go to "Insert" then go to "symbol" and a whole panoply of characters is available for you to choose.

My way of dealing with this problem is to keep a file on my desktop with useful characters.  I go to it and cut and paste as this is usually the quickest way to get it right.  This is because I have an American keyboard on my laptop and cannot use the alt + combinations unfortunately as I do not know how to get them up and running and Compaq isn't telling !!  Pity, as I know most of them by heart.

Nice thead anyway.

Ernie

 

 

 

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To do this the easy way on the Mac, go to System Preferences, then International, Input Menu and check Character Palette. It will then appear in your menu bar, and you can pull it down, choose from a very wide range of accented letters and symbols, and insert them into your text.

Sadly this software doesn't recognise them all...☠➽☃ even Braille is possible on a Mac.

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[quote user="Cassis"]Have you seen Will's incredibly simple solution to this character stuff on a similar thread?  It's a lot more recent than May!
[/quote]

I saw it when he posted it Cassis, downloaded it straight away, and have been using it ever since.  Once again, thank you Will.

To save anyone searching, the relevant post is here:

http://www.completefrance.com/cs/forums/758786/ShowPost.aspx

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