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pronunciation exercises!


odile

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Never mind picking up peppers - let's practise in French. (ahahaha  easy pour moi)

Many will know about les chaussettes de l'archi-duchesse, ou le chasseur sachant chasser sans chien -

here are 2 my French teacher used to make us say as fast as poss:

gros gras grand grain d'orge, quand te degrogragrandorgeras-tu?

Je me degrogragrandorgerai, quand tous les gros gras grands grains d'orge se degrogragraindorgerai

petit pot de beurre quand te depetitpotdebeurrerisas-tu?

Je me depetitpotdebeurreriserai, quand tous les petits pots de beurre se depetitpotdebeurreriseront!

De marrants marrons se marraient sur la mare marecageuse.

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Just in case you have the burning desire to go and buy a peck of pickled peppers, you know, the ones Peter Piper picked [:D]

I'm not a phesant plucker

I'm a phesant plucker's mate

and I'm only plucking phesants

cos the phesant plucker's late

 

Don't know any French tongue twisters though.

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[quote user="Pierre ZFP"]

I'm not a phesant plucker

I'm a phesant plucker's mate

and I'm only plucking phesants

cos the phesant plucker's late[/quote]

I know this one as:

I'm not a pheasant plucker

Nor a pheasant plucker's son

I'm only plucking pheasants till the pheasant plucker comes[:D]

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Combien sont ces six saucissons ci? Ces six saucissons ci sont six sous. Et bien ces six saucissons ci sont six sous trop cher!

this one does mean something - but not particularly useful in everyday life (mind you with inflation at this rate, it might soon be)

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[quote user="odile"]Hi Katie,  could you please enlighten me. When  and where do you use the pickled pepper thingy? Since living in UK I've seen pickled eggs and pickled onions...

[/quote]

Pecks are an old english measure ..... hence useful to  know.  My mother was brilliant at tonguetwisters, but I generally get my tongue tied whether it be in English or French.  Only use for meaning is that it helps to remember them, as well as perhaps using a word that you might be able to produce in real life.  So meaningless tonguetwisters and I don't see eye to eye - I have enough trouble using the eyes and tongue I've already got ..... !!!!!

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As an alternative to tongue-twisters, I think it's valuable to practise the pairs of words or (parts of words) that sound almost the same to a native English speaker, but are quite different to a Frenchman.  For example: 

dent  / dont

sans / son

vous / vu

roue / rue

treille / très

abandon / abondant

If you can get a French friend to cooperate, you can have some fun: try words at random and see if he knows which one you are saying.  You can find enough examples to keep going for a long time. 

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Here's one I prepared earlier:

Ce sont les gens d'Hyères, ceux dont nous avons parlé hier qui produisent la bière "Pierre d'Hyères," si populaire à la presbytère avant de monter en chaire. Ce ne sont pas ceux dont nous avons parlé avant notre arrivé avant-hier à Hyères.

"monter en chaire" = "to go up into the pulpit"

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  • 2 weeks later...
Thanks for the corrections. I think arrivé(e) must have been a typo, as for presbytère, I always work on the assumption that any word ending in e is feminine (unless I know different, e.g. ...age) since 75% are ... ;-)

Oh yes, quite old enough, although I don't remember it (and I don't think I've forgotten it).

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