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Arty Farty terms


Chancer

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I am correcting a draught translation that a French teacher friend is doing for the mother of one of his students, it is a promotional flyer to try and atract English tourists to her arty farty tourist shop.

There are a couple of French terms that I do not recognise and I am also struggling with translating things that I do understand into intelligent English.

In my defence I am not an arty type but these days I really struggle to write correct English, I look at it and think "thats not right" but have a mental blockage when I try to correct it.

Here goes!

Ceruse? - I've never heard of it, it was used in the context of a painted finish and my friend translated it to "ceruse"! Does this mean anything to an English arty person?

Pâte à sel ? In the context of pottery etc, he called it salt modelling.

Trompe à l'oeil? It was in the context of relooking meubles, patinating etc, but I cant see where an eyewash comes into it! Camoflage perhaps?

And now for the English problems, I was not really happy with my translation of "relooking meubles" I used facelifting/ makeover but I am sure that there is a term more adapted to this.

Exposition temporaires They have local artists work and crafts on display plus "exposition temporaires" I put "displays of local Picard artists and craft work" but how do I explain the temporary exhibitions or do we call them expositions in English?

I am really embarrassed to be asking for this help, untill now it has always been me helping and correcting others when asked (as I suppose I am still doing), thank God I dont have to write a letter asking someone for an interview!

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Your doing really well..I would need the whole French text to help, but I am sure that people such as Clair and 5 e will be there first.......

btw you can keep trompe l'œil ...it means the sort painting that gives an almost 3D effect..

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[quote user="J.Rs gone native"]

I am correcting a draught translation that a French teacher friend is doing for the mother of one of his students, it is a promotional flyer to try and atract English tourists to her arty farty tourist shop.

There are a couple of French terms that I do not recognise and I am also struggling with translating things that I do understand into intelligent English.

In my defence I am not an arty type but these days I really struggle to write correct English, I look at it and think "thats not right" but have a mental blockage when I try to correct it.

Here goes!

I could be way out but these are my guesses, happy to be corrected

Ceruse? - I've never heard of it, it was used in the context of a painted finish and my friend translated it to "ceruse"! Does this mean anything to an English arty person?

Dictionary says 'white lead' ? No idea.....

Pâte à sel ? In the context of pottery etc, he called it salt modelling.

Salt dough ? Hard to say without seeing an object

Trompe à l'oeil? It was in the context of relooking meubles, patinating etc, but I cant see where an eyewash comes into it! Camoflage perhaps?

Its an object painted to fool the eye

And now for the English problems, I was not really happy with my translation of "relooking meubles" I used facelifting/ but I am sure that there is a term more adapted to this.

restored/recycled /enhanced / furniture?

Exposition temporaires They have local artists work and crafts on display plus "exposition temporaires" I put "displays of local Picard artists and craft work" but how do I explain the temporary exhibitions or do we call them expositions in English?

 Whats wrong with temporary exhibition ?

[/quote]

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Ceruse? - I've never heard of it, it was used in the context of a painted finish and my friend translated it to "ceruse"! Does this mean anything to an English arty person? (cérusé) - lime-washed (very 90's kitchen cabinet finish)

Pâte à sel ? In the context of pottery etc, he called it salt modelling. Salt dough modelling

Trompe à l'oeil? It was in the context of relooking meubles, patinating etc, but I cant see where an eyewash comes into it! Camoflage perhaps? trompe-l'œil is also used in English to describe a painted decor which fools the eye. (camouflage)

And now for the English problems, I was not really happy with my translation of "relooking meubles" I used facelifting/ but I am sure that there is a term more adapted to this. Hand-painted furniture ?

Exposition temporaires They have local artists work and crafts on display plus "exposition temporaires" I put "exhibits of local Picard artists' art and craft work" but how do I explain the temporary exhibitions or do we call them expositions in English? (I assume the artists don't actually expose themselves [;-)]?)

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Your doing really well..I would need the whole French text to help, but I am sure that people such as Clair and 5 e will be there first.......

Some ideas..

.......

btw you can keep trompe l'œil ...it means the sort painting that gives an almost 3D effect..

pate a sel is a sort of modelling dough

Ceruse is a white pigment

temporary exhibitions

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Thank you both of you for your prompt replies.

I did ask him for the full text so that I could understand the context, when he sent it to me it was in the form of a flyer with the above and many more terms, a bit like what you would paint along the top of a shop window or put in a yellow pages advert.

Re the trompe a l'oeil, I understood that is what it is but just cant find the word or phrase in English, I am sure that there is one.

Re temporary exhibitions, it just doesnt sound right, I'm really not sure that I would print that on a flyer, I want to put the equivalent of "ponctuellement"

I guess what is frustrating me is that my maniac nature is not happy just to do the best translation that I can but to make a flyer that looks like it has been done by an English craft shop owner.

Its the same part of my nature that could no longer drive past a factory entrance with a sign that said 'Please march on the back feet" without going in and correcting it for them.

Iit should have been 'Please reverse at walking pace" (marche arriere à pas) the only problem being at that stage whilst I was capable of correcting the translation I was not capable of expaining myself when I went into reception and the sign complete with many othet gaffes remains uncorrected.

Are there any arty people that can help please?

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I dont know what happened there, I posted my thanks for the quick replies and quite a long posting and all it has done is to add some empty space to Claires previous one, it will have to wait until tomorrow now.

Are there any arty types that can help?

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Here's my take, JR

Ceruse = white lead, ceruse. It's a type of white paint, used (usually) for the ground of the painting. 

Pâte à sel = salt dough

Trompe à l'oeil = trompe l'oeil. Note that we don't usually use the a in English.

Relooking meubles = reworked furniture.  

Exposition temporaires = temporary exhibitions. You could use exhibition programme (or programme of exhibitions) as that implies a changing display.

Depending on the type and standard of the 'craft' work you might want to call it 'applied art'

Hope that's useful.

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Thanks everybody for your advice.

Norman I can assure you that there is no question of me rejecting any of it, its intersting that you cite my manic nature, I meant to write "maniac" in the French sense, what is more interesting is that was written in the posting that dissapeared, did I hit the wrong button and it got sent to you by PM by mistakeor are you able to read it and I not?

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JR, something strange happened after Russethouse's post, but if you change the display options at the top RHS of this thread (display most recent posts first) your lost post magically reappears.
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Had to check on French google as I had never seen Trompe à l'oeil. It is definitely Trompe l'oeil!

Relooking meubles. As a verb to 'relook' means to alter so it has a different style. Elle a relooké sa coiffure. Or even reflexive : il s'est totalement relooké depuis son divorce.

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[quote user="Âme"]Trompe à l'oeil = trompe l'oeil. Note that we don't usually use the a in English.[/quote]Nor in French. It's usually written just with a hyphen: trompe-l'oeil.

Is it possible that the idea of eyewash was the result of confusing tromper ("deceive") with tremper ("soak" or "rinse")?

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We've just returned from a visit to Strasbourg and Colmar, where I saw one of the best examples of trompe l'oeil I have ever seen : It is on the gable end wall of a well-known restaurant in La Petite Venise, and the painted shutters and stonework look incredibly real - even when you are close up. Regrettably I haven't got a photo to hand.... but it's stunning.

I have never heard any translation for trompe l'oeil - we use the same expression in English.
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