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Remplir or récharger?


Chancer

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What verb do I use to describe the filling of a smaller gas container from a larger one, like filling a briquette from a bombe or in my case a nail gun cartridge from the same source?

I think being gas it should be récharger but as its a liquid gas and in fact it is the liquid not the gas that is transferred should it be remplir?

What ever is the correct one how can I express "refillable" would it be remplissable or réchargeable?

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Remplissable doesn't exist (or maybe it does?????) (although one would understand what you mean!)

Chancer, I only have a bicycle and a shopping trolley, so I don't have fuel in either.[:P] But it's true, you "remplis" the tank. If you "remplis" it full, it is "faire le plein!"

Rechargeable is for cartridge, but also for batteries!

 

edit: "remplissable" does exist now, the word has been invented in relation to pdf files!

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Shouldn't it be remplisible?  (If indeed it's anything!)

I like "on peut le remplir/recharger" rather than making up words for the sake of it but 5E is better placed than I to judge.  My instinct would be to follow the rules as in English : Refill vs Recharge.

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I have a dictionary that says recharger can mean to recharge (e.g. a battery), or to refill (e.g. a cigarette lighter), or to reload (e.g. a gun).  So I think you're on safe ground.

But it is recharger, with no accent.

I think remplir just means to fill, not necessarily to refill.

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And I like Cooperlola thought that remplir was to refill, in fact I had a notion that if you fill something for the first time you should not use remplir, but then again its not charger either, nor could it be faire le plein, plir anybody? [:P]

Thanks for the advice re the accent

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Again relying on my dictionary, it seems that remplir just means 'to fill' without specifying whether it's the first time; if you want to make it clear that it's a refill you can say remplir à nouveau.

The word plein, as a noun, can mean "a full tank", which explains the phrase faire le plein.  But apparently it can refer to other things that may be full, e.g. le théâtre a fait le plein, the theatre has a full house.

As for the accent; I find it difficult to know when re- at the beginning of a verb should have an accent.  I have noticed that in words where the "re" means doing something again, it usually doesn't have an accent (e.g. recharger, reconnaître, revenir, recommencer, revoir) except when the main verb starts with a vowel (introduire, installer, unir, animer,apparaître.)  But I don't know whether this always works, and of course it doesn't help at all when the "re" doesn't mean that.

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[quote user="pachapapa"]rouvrir   réouvrir [/quote]

Not sure what your point is.  Rouvrir doesn't begin with "re", so my theory doesn't apply.  Réouvrir doesn't exist, as far as I know.  (But réouverture does, which is curious.)

An interesting exception is répéter, which clearly means doing something again.  But I can see why repéter might be a word to avoid in polite circles.

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[quote user="allanb"][quote user="pachapapa"]rouvrir   réouvrir [/quote]
Not sure what your point is.  Rouvrir doesn't begin with "re", so my theory doesn't apply.  Réouvrir doesn't exist, as far as I know.  (But réouverture does, which is curious.)

An interesting exception is répéter, which clearly means doing something again.  But I can see why repéter might be a word to avoid in polite circles.
[/quote]

[:-))]

http://conjugueur.reverso.net/conjugaison-francais-verbe-r%C3%A9ouvrir.html

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In the end I may have to apologize for doubting the existence of réouvrir.  But my doubts remain.  Le Grand Robert & Collins doesn't recognize it; neither does the so-called Petit Larousse (which is actually quite big).  Also, FWIW, Joseph Hanse, in Difficultés du français moderne, says: [réouvrir] et [réouvert] ne sont pas corrects.  On dit rouvrir, rouvert, bien qu'on dise "la réouverture."  He doesn't give reasons.

As for the meaning of se rouvrir (or se réouvrir, if you insist): I suppose it could be said of something like a door.  "J'avais fermé la porte mais elle s'est rouverte à cause du vent" – maybe?
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[quote user="pachapapa"]

[quote user="allanb"][quote user="pachapapa"]rouvrir   réouvrir [/quote]
Not sure what your point is.  Rouvrir doesn't begin with "re", so my theory doesn't apply.  Réouvrir doesn't exist, as far as I know.  (But réouverture does, which is curious.)

An interesting exception is répéter, which clearly means doing something again.  But I can see why repéter might be a word to avoid in polite circles.
[/quote]

[:-))]

http://conjugueur.reverso.net/conjugaison-francais-verbe-r%C3%A9ouvrir.html

[/quote]

http://www.projet-voltaire.fr/blog/regle-orthographe/%C2%AB-reouvrir-%C2%BB-ou-%C2%AB-rouvrir-%C2%BB

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