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French giving up its hostility to anglophone words?


NormanH

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But the people sort of have allowed english words in anyway over the years.  This is just more 'official' isn't it?

The academie is full of itself, what with it's embroided jackets and swords........ and there was me thinking that the pen was mightier than the sword, didn't Victor Hugo say that, or have I misremembered?........

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They could make a start by recognising those foreign words that they already use and pronouncing them in the correct manner for the original language, by and large all English speakers do this when using French words and common place names (exceptions like Reims accepted) but the French steadfastly refuse, no Wonder they have so much trouble Learning English or ordering a cheeseburger and fries in Macdo's anywhere else in the world.

And then to top it all the minister who seems to be forward looking trots out this old claptrap:

However, she conceded some terms simply did not make sense in French – especially those relating to digital subjects, such as email and e-commerce. The English e sound is represented by the letter i in French.

“The word e-commerce, for example, makes no sense in French from a linguistic point of view because the ‘e’ is not pronounced the same, so we have to think about this,” the minister said.

Heaven forbid that we should expect people to think the first time they pronounce a foreign word [:'(]

The rest of us just adapt by saying un mél instead of E-mail or courriel and have no problem making ourselves understood.

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It would be nice if a sweat shirt was not called 'sweet', that I admit, but it is a two way thing.........

could we get english speakers to pronounce 'vu' properly as they should when saying deja vu? As it is they say "already 'you'", which is nonsense and drives me mad........ so maybe I'll take my MIL's attitude and say san fairy ann about it all[6]

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Good examples and you would need to have a French speakers ear to appreciate the difference, being spoken in English between English speakers the subtilitities are perhaps not as important but in general, in English when a French word is used there is a desire to pronounce it in the correct way that is not only absent with the French but quite the opposite, they will go to great legths not to.

It makes me cringe when I see French TV presenters who speak superb English having to deliberately mispronouce in front of camera, even when using a word that is not known to the French, a business term for instance that they have to explain the meaning of.

Many many French words in the English language that are pronounced correctly I am sure most people dont even realise, if they reflected they would notice that they correctly pronounce them is different to the general rule in English.

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I alway remember a French TV interview with James Hunt at the height of his F1 career.

The interview was being conducted in French and Hunt was acquitting himself quite well, until the interviewer asked him what he liked to do outside F1 driving.

"Avez-vous des hobbies?" He was asked. The pronunciation of "hobbies" with, of course, no attempt at sounding the "h" just left him completely baffled, and the interviewer had to rephrase the question before he twigged.
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[quote user="You can call me Betty"]I alway remember a French TV interview with James Hunt at the height of his F1 career.

The interview was being conducted in French and Hunt was acquitting himself quite well, until the interviewer asked him what he liked to do outside F1 driving.

"Avez-vous des hobbies?" He was asked. The pronunciation of "hobbies" with, of course, no attempt at sounding the "h" just left him completely baffled, and the interviewer had to rephrase the question before he twigged.[/quote]

This has made me smiled.

I think I could have coped with les 'obbies, it was when I was asked what was my occupation préferée that I was a bit stumped.  Still, I must have looked suitably mystified because I was then asked what I liked doing in my spare time.

Now, I just say such-and-such is mon truc...........no more misunderstanding!

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Sacre bleu! French critics' anger as new series about great monarch Louis XIV is being produced in English.

At €2.7 million an episode, the French have realised that it has to be made in English otherwise it will not sell. I understand that even Louis XIV is being played by an English actor!

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Un karting is the most ridiculous one that I know of, if you have not come across it before its the French word for go kart, a powered one, not sure if they have others words for pedal carts or soap box carts.

In fact the whole adding "ing" to a noun instead of a verb just sounds ridiculous and stupid, "un brushing" I can just about accept as brush can be used as a verb and I assume that whilst blow drying they use a brush, do they? but as for footing [8-)] at least they are trying to use it as an action but where does that leave "un karting"

I sincerely hope that words like the above are not created and endorsed by L'académie Française but how do they come into being, is it an English guy with a sense of humour winding them up perhaps?

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How different words irritate us all. And still, as I have mentioned, my No 1 hate is people saying 'sweet' for sweat in sweat shirt. It really does drive me mad when I hear it, this amount of profound irritation, has developed over more years than I care to remember.

[;-)]Still, the way I murder some french pronunciations....... maybe I should say no more........

In my defence I do try, it is just like when I sing, what my brain tells my mouth to do and how the sound comes out, is not necessarily the same[Www]

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According to Larousse "jogging" has taken over from the faux anglicism"footing" which is now old fashioned and out of date.

Not round here it isnt, when I do slower training runs with the other athlètes I always correct them and say we are jogging, not footing, they say no, you are wearing your jogging beneath your sweet.

I was trying to find out what un cross meant in terms of a running race, I may even have asked on here, I was gobsmacked when a non running friend said to me that he thought it came from the English "cross country", gobsmacked not by his knowledge but by the fact he pronounced it in the English manner and not Kross coontree.

In fact I was very touched that he had made the effort for me.

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And where I used to live, line dancing, which was very popular was called 'country'. I cannot even type how my friend used to say it, as the ree was added quietly to the end. The first bit she used to almost shout out and it was not coon, rather the C word,  a proper 'u' sound   with the nt on the end, then as I said, with a rather quiet 'ree'.

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I think that they have always been called tramways. I know that there were some in the Alpes, sadly closed before we got to France...... and then Grenoble decided to start them up again and they seem to be everywhere now.

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Not to make light of the TF1 Dropped accident, but the news people use the word "crash" to report the helicopter accident. I thought this was an anglo word but I understand its old French and only used to describe aerial accidents.
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