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What SB said................


Teamedup

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Thought I was well versed in this kind of language and apart from tartine meaning shoes, donner un coup de tartine = kicking, and faire une tartine = being long-winded, I cannot think of anything that even vaguely approaches an "intimate act" for this expression. I am thus intrigued since this word is definitely missing from what I prided myself in thinking was my very extensive vocabulary. Please enlighten me.

Katie
Docteur ès argot

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And while I'm on the subject (yes I'm a closet tartine fetichist), what about Richard Bohringer in the film DIVA going on about "le zen dans l'art de la tartine" while his aquarium was sliding from side to side... This was probably the first French film that really grabbed me, but perhaps that was bacause I didn't understand anything.

Katie

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Sorry forgotten about this thread.

I reckon that giving an adult a piece of bread that you have buttered must be something akin to hand feeding them grapes or strawberries. 

I sat there  at our dinner table and for no good reason that I can remember, buttered all the bread I'd put out. You must know those moments in life when everyone is watching you and you don't get what is going on. So after a 'quoi' on my part they agreed in the end that one did one's own tartine and that to do it for someone else was an intimate act. And they were not clearer than that, these folks from Brittany, the NE and this region of the Rhone Alps.  Very strange and always amuses me now, there again, it never takes much to amuse me.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Mmm, you know you're almost French when you get excited at the thought of buttering someone's bread... I remain resolutely English, I'd far rather be hand fed strawberries, always remember that scene in Tess.
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If you go for David's basic meaning of tartine it could be a reference to the poem by AA Milne "The king asked the queen and the queen asked the dairymaid - could we have some butter for the royal slice of bread" etc But from my experience of SB's postings there's probably more to it than that  Pat.
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To me it made complete sense...spreading the butter or confiture on a slice of bread.  Ready to dip in his coffee.

I asked OH if it had a sexual meaning and he said no.  BUT, to faire a tartine also means to droan on for ages.  As in Our Jacques addressing the Nation.

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"always remember that scene in Tess"

Are you referring to the scene in the book or Polansky's more recent film version filmed on the Cotentin Pensinsula substituting (so effectively) for Hardy's Dorset?  Can't remember the feeding of strawberry's but can never forget the fantastic opening scene.  The camera remaining fixed focussed on a country lane and a field.  We hear the folk band coming from the left of the screen, it passes in front of us with the revellers dancing and frollicking and then disappears off to the right all in the space of five minutes.  And during that time the camera hasn't moved and we're still looking at the lane and the field listening to the music and the cries of the people now disappearing off in to the distance.  Haven't seen it for ages but will watch it again when we've stopped remembering the anniversary of Truffaut's death and watch something else in the evenings.  M

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Absolutely - if I was referring to Hardy I'd have written "Tess of the D'Urbervilles", I don't remember the scene in the book although it's probably there... I think you may have explained why I found Dorset ever so slightly disappointing, I must have had images of the Cotentin Peninsula lurking in the back of my mind... I haven't read much Hardy but, in spite of the much more comfortable living in Dorset compared to here, I think there is a fatalistic attitude which is just like my little corner of France... we had to study "The Sacrilege" at school, it was the only poem I appreciated of those we did.
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"I haven't read much Hardy but, in spite of the much more comfortable living in Dorset compared to here, I think there is a fatalistic attitude which is just like my little corner of France"

Pucette, I realise now why I so enjoy your postings, they disturb ideas of my own currently lying dormant.

You've got me thinking about the pessimism in Hardy and how reminiscent it is of attitudes in rural France amongst local people even today.  Odd that it still prevails, though perhaps not when you consider - which we all should do and more often - how genuinely hard life is in many parts of rural France for a lot of people.   You're far better equipped to comment on that than I am but a broader discussion on this subject would make an interesting thread.  (Didn't we have one a long time back entitled "rural poverty"?)

I'm also reminded of the warmth with which Hardy painted his yokel characters, I can't recall a bad one amongst them.  Not so sure that's so accurate.

I was force fed a diet of Hardy by an English mistress at school but nowadays would only turn to his poems, not sure I could face a novel.

M

 

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Mmm, don't think there were many good characters either, in Tess of the d'Urbervilles at least isn't it more a matter of Hardy's warmth and compassion giving us such an impression of their "more sinned against than sinning" motivation?
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