Jump to content
Complete France Forum

"Two Steps Backward"


Monika

Recommended Posts

I have just read "Two Steps Backward" by Susie Kelly, and found it such a good read. Does anybody know Susie Kelly, if yes, could you encourage her to write another book please.  She is a very talented writer, she has got it just right, the amount of humour and sadness.

Monika

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Diary of an Ordinary Woman" by Margaret Forster

Not really about France although France does get some mention WW1 and WW2.

An excellent read.

WARNING:  DO NOT READ THE END  before you have read the whole story.

Gill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for that Lee, I have just written on the Total France Forum and hope that Susie will read it and I will try and get "Best Foot Forward".

M: It is about a couple moving to France having lost all of their money, but the owners of a very old Farmhouse in need of restoring. They move there with all their animals, dogs, cats, old horses and parrot. The husband has got to go back to England to try and support them. It is a very funny book but also very sad (you might need Kleenex Tissues). But it reminds me of the Chinese proverb: There are only three things you need for happiness: Something to love, something to do and something to hope for.

Thank you Gill for your suggestion, I will try and get it from the Library or otherwise from Amazon.

Monika

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will look out for Two Steps Forward and the other one. Thanks for recommending them.

 

I have recently read and enjoyed "A Year in the M*rde" which was a "fun" read. I remember one chapter where the writer referred to switching into " emergency, grammar free French" LOL, that one I really identified with!

 

Gill (17 / 99)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But it reminds me of the Chinese proverb: There are only three things you need for happiness: Something to love, something to do and something to hope for.

So true, which reminds me of the line in Charlotte Gray where she's asked what is the most important thing to have and she says, quite rightly, hope.  (I would quote the line but the study's still in the process of being re-decorated and all our books are in boxes.  Not having access to my books is a nightmare and making me very irritable.  In fact, it's en par with having PMT for weeks on end!)

Thanks for background on the book, sounds a very good read.

M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love those three books written by Sebastian Faulks, I read Birdsong first and I had never really thought much about the First World War, but that brings it really home, all the men who died in that war and what terrible conditions they fought in.  The scene after one of the battles was horrendous, I can't remember the exact words, but when the whole battleground  was moaning in agony.

On a lighter note: I quite liked the book "The Virgin blue" by Tracy Chevallier (especially interesting if you have French or Swiss connection) I think she wrote another book, which was much more famous, but can't think which one?

Monika

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been reading one of the most enjoyable books about France I have ever found. It is called 'The Ripening Sun' by Patricia Atkinson. It is a true story of overcoming huge problems to settle in France and create something very special against all odds. It is by degrees amusing, informative and moving.

I would thoroughly recommend it to anyone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is amazing Gill, I just found the book you recommended "Diary of an Ordinary Woman" on a Market stall in Blandford for 50 pence. I was so pleased.

Brian I will try and order "The Ripening Sun" ond FPN, Living France or failing that on Amazon. Thanks for your recommendation.

Monika 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Monika

please let me know if you enjoy he book. I know that one person's taste is not always for everyone, but I was very moved by Patricia's book (to the extent of Kleenex needed!!)

I don't know if it is just co-incidence, but someone has started a thread in Food and Drink about Patricia's wines. I haven't had chance to try any yet but I will be visiting her vineyard when we move to 47 in September.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My wife bought both of Susie Kelly's books. I was urged to read them by her and much to my amazement I was really taken.  Many of us have had some setbacks when moving to France, but what she went through when she first arrived with her husband and many pets, has to be read to be believed. It was an inspiration to us both. They came across as such lovely caring people. Much better I think than 'A year in Provence'!

It is good news indeed if it is a fact that she is writing another tome and we shall be first in the queue to purchase it. I have seen her web site on Total France where she has book writing consultancy to help aspiring writers. I was tempted to submit my own novel to her, but do not think that it is good enough!

We are living in the Charente and I think that she lives not far from us in Confolens and although not wishing to impinge on her privacy, would really like to meet her personally. She is a very brave woman and an inspiration to all those who are fortunate to have read her books!

Lautrec

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

[quote]Hi Monika please let me know if you enjoy he book. I know that one person's taste is not always for everyone, but I was very moved by Patricia's book (to the extent of Kleenex needed!!) I don't know...[/quote]

Bryan, the book was fantastique, I could hardly read the end, first, because it was so sad (you were right: lots of tissues needed), secondly I was also sad to finish it (although I still am reading "Diary of an Ordinary Woman", which is very good too). Did Patricia write a second book and what is the title?  Tell us please about your visit in due course to her vineyard and the sampling?

Monika

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote]"Diary of an Ordinary Woman" by Margaret Forster Not really about France although France does get some mention WW1 and WW2. An excellent read. WARNING: DO NOT READ THE END before you have read th...[/quote]

Gill, I have just finished "Diary of an Ordinary Woman, and yes, what a surprise at the end (I even felt a bit cheated somehow!). But it was a brilliant book. Thanks for recommending it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did Patricia write a second book and what is the title?  Tell us please about your visit in due course to her vineyard and the sampling?

Monika, I'm responsible for the posting on her wines in the Food & Drink section.  Having come across so many references to them in recent months by international wine critics in all sorts of publications I was rather curious.  Forum member Ian Hoare knows them well and makes some very interesting comments.  Someone else mentions that when they were last at her place she was in the middle of writing a sequel.  Sounds as though she's got an interesting set up there with a couple of gites too.  M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was tempted to submit my own novel to her, but do not think that it is good enough!

You know there are people who will read your work for a smallish fee (around £200/£300) and give you professional advice? 

We are living in the Charente and I think that she lives not far from us in Confolens and although not wishing to impinge on her privacy, would really like to meet her personally.

Isn't this a dilemma.  Admirers knocking on the front door and having picnics on the lawn is supposedly what drove Peter Mayle to move after the initial success of a Year in Provence.  Even worse, Under a Tuscan Sun author Frances Mayes's home in Cortona is actually included in formal tours for American groups visiting the region.  Such is the price of fame, I guess.

M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Half asleep this morning whilst placing an order at Amazon, on reflection not the best time to do it.  Was just about to click "add to shopping basket" when I noticed that the book I was about to buy was "One Step Backwards, Two Steps Forwards: Soviet Society & Politics in the New Economic Policy".  You can imagine how disappointed I'd have been to unwrap that...   M
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...