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Cream...again!


Wicce

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Hi all.

I've been on the hunt for double cream since we arrived in France a few years ago, sorry to say with no real success.  But, I think I may have cracked it, courtesy of my wily aged mother, who said: "how stupid, just make it".  And this is what you do:

Melt 4 oz of unsalted butter in 1/4 pint whole milk (not semi-skimmed) over a gentle heat.  When it has completely melted, take it off the stove to cool for a couple of minutes, and then put it into a blender.  Whizz up for 1 minute and stop when the cream starts to thicken.  Don't be tempted to whizz it for too long or you get clotted cream.   Put the mixture into the fridge to chill and, voila, cream.   A bit of experimentation with amounts of milk to butter should produce different thicknesses, but the taste is pretty good.  Try it.

Bon appetit.

Mary

 

 

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Fantastic, I survived the last 4 years in Holland without double cream and was gutted to find I couldn't see it easily in the supermarket here.  Only one question....

Has your Mum got any other wonderful recipes she'd be willing to share?

 

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Ummm... you don't "make" cream.

It can either be produced by using a separator, or simply by leaving full milk to stand for 24 hours (single) or 48 hours (double) and skimming.

Whatever results from over-whizzing butter and milk together, it certainly ain't clotted cream!

One gallon of full milk will yield 3/4 - 1lb of clotted cream. Leave to stand (preferably in an earthenware bowl) for 12 - 24 hours at room temperature (13 degrees) until the cream rises. Stand the bowl over boiling water (but not touching it) for about an hour, when a crust will have formed on top. Leave to cool until the next day, then skim off the yummy clotted cream!

Jo
(originally from Devon where we made it with very creamy Devon or Channel Island milk).

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Ok, so technically the recipe may not be correct, but in this day and age with time limits and room temperatures well above 13 degrees, what's the harm in taking a short cut for a suitable alternative?

 

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It depends on what you are using the cream for of course, but if it is just 'in' something, I whip up a cold bottle of that liquid créme fraîche.

I have substituted loads of different things in my time.  Marscapone (sp), tubs of créme fraîche, soft cheese....I ended up buying a French book on desserts and doing what they do.

Can't say that I am keen on using gelatine though.  In fact, I don't think I have.  I don't mind my pudding running a bit.  I can lick the plate then

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Any cool place will do. Forgot to say that the milk should be untreated (not pasteurised). Ask the nearest dairy farm if you can't buy lait cru locally.

Another idea - contact your local cream-producing farm and ask to buy the cream after the separator has done its bit, but before they stir in the culture that produces the sour taste. We have a friend who works at one who brings us tubs of cream "au naturel" - yum! She (and the owners think we're rather odd and that the uncultured cream will do something harmful to us...

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I buy UHT Double Cream at our local SuperU.  Can't remember what it's called, but it does say 'professional' on the carton. Unfortunately (depending on how you look at it!) they only sell it in litre cartons and you can find it in the Long-Life milk section. 

Julie

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Yes, I buy the same thing - creme liquide UHT 'professionel'. It whips up fine. Or, more expensively, Elle et Vire brand does a UHT creme liquide also (full fat if you want to whip it, not the legere version). You find these near the UHT milk, not in the chiller. The Elle et Vire comes in small cartons also. To me it tastes absolutely fine, tho some people say they get a UHT taste from it.

Jo

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Nobody has mentioned chantilly mix.  At one time I used this whipped up in the tubs of créme fraîche to put on say, the top of a trifle.  Haven't used it for years.

I seem to remember that it wasn't too sweet.  Not really double cream though.

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[quote]Any cool place will do. Forgot to say that the milk should be untreated (not pasteurised). Ask the nearest dairy farm if you can't buy lait cru locally. Another idea - contact your local cream-produc...[/quote]

Sorry, I just quoted this because it made me laugh, it sounds so simple, but it'd probably take me about an hour to get to a dairy farm! We're not all in the countryside (although given that I'm in the Rhone and if you are following the news at the moment you'll understand that I wish I were!)

I just wondered about the original recipe, how long does it keep once you've made it?
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So now it involves a drive to Normandy too!  I was already put off by the 48 hour skimming process.  I could get a Ryanair cheapy and pop to the local supermarket in the UK to buy the real stuff in less time.
I think given the choice I'll stick with one of the alternatives supplied - that said I haven't needed double cream yet!
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Hi there, Tourangelle - if your enquiry is about my wily parent's cream-making  recipe, the answer is several days in the fridge.  Cover bowl with clingfilm because it will absorb flavours from amything else.  Tastes pretty good fresh-made or a few days old.   Best of all, get the thickness right and you can whip it up just like double cream, and it stays firm not frothy.

Mary

 

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