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diabetics and christmas menus


opas

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I will do a search through the various cookery sites later, but for now would like some ideas from anyone who has to cater for a Diabetic ( diet controlled...not insulin)

I was delighted yesterday to get a phone call from my dad who said he would love to come and stay at Christmas......so last night we were discussing menus.  He is diabetic(only recent) and is controling it quite well, so I do not want to send his sugar through the roof with all the indulgence that goes with a full monty christmas meal, we have sorted out starters, main course but what would anyone suggest for a dessert?   he does eat small portions of cake, and icecream...but it is christmas and feel something special is needed....Help!

Mrs O

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I have already done this. For an xmas pud replacement I made an apple pie with a little dried fruit in it and some mixed spice, it tastes very xmasy and as the pastry has no sugar in it and the apple if needed can have sugar replacement it works out fine.

Since then I reckon I would use my 'special' pastry recipe and use the same filling and make up little parcels.

A little creme liquid perhaps with a dash of rum or not depending on what the person could have accompanys this nicely.

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I've already posted my recipe for mascapone pastry and haven't got it to hand at the moment I am afraid.

Yes you could put sultanas in it but I like mixed dried fruit best and mixed spice more a taste of a brit xmas than a german one, as I didn't want it to make a simple strudel. But it is all a matter of taste. I have my neighbours in France wanting mixed spice so thanks I'll have to get it out for them.

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  • 2 weeks later...
First of all ignore the two posts above this one - they have apparently missed the diabetic links. Diabetics need to be careful about fats and sugars, so mascarpone not a good idea, go easy on raisins (check for added sugars).

Have a look at

http://www.diabetes.org.uk/eatwell/index.html

http://www.diabetic-recipes.com/

http://www.diabetes.org.uk/eatwell/meal_planning/options.htm

In general, food which forms part of a healthy low-fat diet, and avoids sugar as much as possible, should be OK. You can use artificial sweetener or fructose in recipes you prepare yourself. Look out for 'hidden' sugars (read labels carefully) especially in mixers etc. Small regularly spaced meals are better than blow-outs (difficult at Christmas).

Unless you get completely excessive for days on end a bit of indulgence shouldn't matter too much.

Bon appetit!
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I agree totally with Dick - having been diabetic for 15 years and also using insulin, it is a matter of moderation - since moving out here a big temptation is the cheese - so a little now and then and consider what else you are eating. Most diabetics know what impacts them - we are all different - and most will enjoy others not being aware that they have a problem - so press on with the Christmas Pud

Have a good christmas and enjoy

also Happy New Year

James[:)]

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The only diabetic I have fed has been on insulin injections since childhood. I would hope and assume that as adult he knew what he could have and couldn't have. AS I would assume all diabetics would tell their host the same.

We are not talking about 'gaving' anyone here, just a small portion of christmas fayre aren't we, sans added sugar.

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Having done what I orriginaly said I would (do a search ) I found some realy good sites through the BBC food, they are probably the ones that Dick listed. Having read through the various sites , I have decided on a christmas pud from one of these sites, and some icecreams .

After reading these sites and what the posters who are diabetic have said I feel more confident now.

I agree that an adult should know what is good/bad for them but my dad did not know he was diabetic until he went for a routine check up for another ailment and unlike some he only knows he has had too much of something when he does his blood test.

It all becomes very confusing for someone who is nearly 80 to be told that they have to watch their diet when they have only recently started to cater for themselves.

Thanks for the responses.

Mrs O

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Hi all,

My husband is diabetic type 2 (diagnosed in France) and I agree it is

difficult over Christmas.  I found that you can buy 'sucres lents'

in packets at the chemist and although they are expensive, you actually

use very little.  Have a good Christmas!

Elaine

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I've been a Type II diabetic for years and nothing annoys me more than someone preparing something specially for me or telling me I can't have something because "it is not good for you".I am an adult and wish to be treated as such!!!
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JC, I hope that statement wasn`t directed at me .

I also hate someone telling me I shouldn`t eat that bar of chocolate or have that glass of wine(or 3) as I am fat enough or have drank the recommended quota.

But some of us actualy want to make sure that we do not kill our loved ones unintensionaly and as stated this twist in my dads health is a new one on all of us as a family, this man of nearly 80 has never sufered anything more than tonsilitis for as far as I can remember and is a learning curve for all of us.

now for me , we would have a full monty beakfast, a few apperos with the foire gras the roast diner with all the trimmings and a `normal` christmas pud washed down with copious amounts of various wines to be followed with an afternoon in front of the box with another of milk and dark assortments on my knee.........but I know it is not good for me and my dad would be the saint he always has been and refuse what he know he should not have, and probably be hungry by 4pm!

Mrs O

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And he can have most of that,cut down on the sweet things,make sure the chocolate is really plain,Poulain(Cadbury France)make a plain chocolate with sweetener not sugar,plenty of carbohydrates and vegetables and you can still have a good Christmas.
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When I was first diagnosed with diabetes, my dietician said that the same diet is suitable for all - including those with diabetes. Low fat, low sugar, plenty of veg. and plenty of complex carbs - bread, pasta, rice, potatoes etc. Common sense is a good additive. Most people with diabetes know how to exercise good control. Whether they choose to or not is up to them.

The good news for desserts is that after a meal with plenty of complex carb the sugar is absorbed less quickly and a moderate helping of Christmas pud or whatever isn't the end of the world. I can also take some extra insulin but I don't know if people on tablets only have similar possibilities. Although some people are extremely thoughtful and make me something special, it isn't always appropriate anyway  - or, more likely, I like the look of their dessert better!

Compliments of the season and bon appétit

Graham

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[quote user="Jc"]And he can have most of that,cut down on the sweet things,make sure the chocolate is really plain,Poulain(Cadbury France)make a plain chocolate with sweetener not sugar,plenty of carbohydrates and vegetables and you can still have a good Christmas.[/quote]

And that was exactly the sort of advice I was seeking....alternatives. Thank you

Mrs O

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Why not have a look at GI diets (there are several around) I think the same principal applies, you are after carbohydrates with a 'slow burn' rather than a quick peak.

One tip that TOH has used to good effect is cinnamon capsules. (its best to make them yourself, although fiddly). They are available commercially but a lot more expensive......

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And as you can see from my first answer,I am well fed-up with people who are not diabetics but think they know more about it than you.I am glad you are being responsible-so a few more words.I would cut down on the foie gras,tho' I do eat pate and terrines,for the pre-dinner aperitifs,stay off sweet wines,muscats and sherries but I will drink dry wines,beer and scotch.Roasts,potatoes and vegetables-no problem.For dessert,I tend to stay off sweet things and cream(creme fraiche and low fat Greek yoghourt are replacements) and ice cream but cheese and biscuits and sorbet,I do eat.I avoid sweet liqueurs but I will drink brandy(or scotch).As someone above said an occasional blow-out is OK,but don't make a habit of it.Just for the record,I have lost 35 lb.and my blood is consistently in the 4.5 to 5.5 mml/l bracket.
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Well done, but dad definatly does not want to lose weight, he is now to about 9 st 10 about a stone down on his long term weight, yes I know he is getting older but he certainly needs to maintain his weight. He has always been very rigid in his eating habits, if he put weight on over a holiday ,then the cake/bread and butter would be cut(puts me to shame as i just give in).

So definatly white meat/fish, spuds and 2 veg. he does indulge in a bit of cake. Has given up chocolate completely and will not drink...due to the diabetic drugs , does not smoke..........what I am leading to is, you know those gorgeously appetising dried fruit gift sets that are in all the supermarkets, would they be a suitable gift or silly as it sounds , does the sugar increase in a dried fruit as they certainly taste sweeter thn a fresh fruit to me?

Mrs O

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Hmmm - I think you have gone off at a tangent here - I am not suggesting your father goes on a weight reducing diet, rather that you look at the GI diets (South Beach is one) as they list foods with a low Glycemic index which is what diabetics usually need. (slow release energy)

 They also show foods with high glycemic index (to be avoided) as they give a 'sugar peak' for want of a better expression, rather like athletes eating bananas for quick energy. I'm afraid you are correct about dried fruits, I suspect your father would have to be very sparing with them.

However TOH went for a check today and the nurse just suggested taking regular readings through the Christmas season, just to keep a check and may be slow down if levels are going a little haywire. [^][B]

 

 

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If they are true dried fruits like prunes and aprocots,they should be Ok in moderation;He should increase the frequency of his blood tests throughout the Christmas period-this will give him early warnng of any problems-remember that you can get plain chocolate with sweetener not sugar and a moderate amount of alcohol is OK(according to my surgery) with the drugs I'm on which are Metformin and four others.
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You can also make Christmas pudding without any sugar or fat if you use enough fruit.   One year I forgot to add sugar and it was so good that I have made it like that ever since.   No flour or breadcrumbs either - just fruit, nuts, eggs and brandy.   It's probably not the best thing for diabetics but a small helping wouldn't hurt.
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Russethouse,I was actualy refering to Jc about the weight loss (and should have made reference to that in my posting) I will do a search later about the GI diet which seems to be what my dad needs..he has always burned his calories off quickly and that was part of the reason behind this post, I felt myself that there was something wrong in his diet for him to lose weight when eating so much and thought that some foods were probably reacting .

Opaline I have just made a christmas cake and reduced the sugar by one third and made up the difference with apple, I have put in dates glace cherries ,sultanas and dried apricots.....have had a job to keep mr O away from it, It smells delicious.

Jc , Dad is also on metformin plus other medications , but has never realy drank much, so what I meant was that a bottle of something was off his christmas list.....oh well It`ll have to be more Socks

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Well someone may find this site usefull.....if they have access to Graham(sp) crackers and brown sugar replacement? how about the sponge cake with 7 (seven) eggs in it.....there goes the cholesterol levels! . looked at a few Diabetic websites and quite a few are american.

Mrs O

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