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finding cepes


seb47

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I'm desperate to find some cepes as I know they grow somewhere around here - my neighbour gave me some last year. Without giving locations away of course (!) can any one give me clues where to start looking and what growing conditions they like - e.g. in a sunny woodland clearing or on a wet day? early morning?  Our market mushroom lady thought they would be arriving within the next few days. Can't wait!

Sue.

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>>>I'm desperate to find some cepes as I know they grow somewhere around here ....... Can't wait<<<

Get yourself this most excellent book :

'Mushrooms and other fungi of Great Britain and Europe'

by Roger Philipps published by Pan Books

ISBN 0330264419

First published in 1981 so possibly out of print if not on amazon you should get a copy....

The photographs are excellent and so are the explanations. Mostly orientated to finding these critters in UK, I admit, but with the description of habitats, you should be able to find what you want where you live.

Around here (Mid-Wales) I know places for girolles. You'll see me with my 2 baskets on sunny sunday afternoons (ideally not the best time, early morning is better) gathering them and the odd ceps but not many. People thought I was MAD and must be from some kind of witchcraft sect! to eat such things!

Indeed the first time I'd found some girolles here (the excitement!) and cooked them for a sunday lunch, my OH and his Mother thought I was going to poison them ! ...
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 According to our neighbour who a couple of weeks ago picked masses in the woods near us, they have finished.

This could be a ploy to keep us out of the woods though!! (either that or she has picked them all!)

Happy hunting!

Louise

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My elderly neighbour insists that you will find Cepes 10 days after 15mm of rain has fallen and that it is best to look under oak trees. Yes she does have a rain gauge. Last month, despite recently leaving hospital having had a blood clot removed from her leg, she arrived in our yard at high speed doing a handbrake turn in an old van nearly as old as her. She said she must be in her coffin before giving up mushrooming. Anyway, the result was two days of Cepes and since then nothing - not much rain either.
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Oh what fun! Mik your neighbour sounds great. I found some things with yellow undersides resembling cepes under an oak tree which I'm led to believe by previous owners is a truffle tree! We were a little unsure whether they were safe to eat as they were smaller than the market variety. (Also found a lot with red undersides which according to my guide are Bolets Satan - toxique).But that very same day our neighbour and his brother arrived back in 'the white van' from a trip to woods near Lacapelle Biron with huge quantities of beauties. He gave us at least a kilo (18 euros worth) so we chucked our dubious ones away. We had a feast. The remainder I slow cooked for about an hour then froze on a tray to bag up.

I can't wait for the truffles to appear and am planning a trip to the truffle market in Lalbenque- I've never tasted one, but am determined to do so. I think this year may have been a good one with all the rainfall in August.

Happy hunting !

Sue

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I've been finding puffballs springing up under my oak trees at the back of the garden this week. Seems to only take a few days and  a lovely ostrich-egg sized one or two appear as if overnight -  lovely in soups or lightly breaded and fried up in thick slices. And even for a beginner you can hardly go wrong in identifying them as long as you slice them straight through the top to ensure they haven't any gills or other signs of Amanitas inside.
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 My neighbour found 3 this morning (cepes that is). There must be something in the waiting however long after rain business. Also we had some mushrooms growing in our field last week which she told me to eat. I was a bit wary but she knows her stuff ( I hope), but they were delicious. She called them 'Nez de Chat' or something like that. They all look the same to me, even looking in my book baffles me!

Louise

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Don't forget that if you collect mushrooms and are unsure of there comestibility you can take them to a pharmacy for checking - I have done this in the past.

I have a carrier back full of chopped cèpes in my freezer  [:P]  My 8yo daughter goes to a Centre Equestre and she & the owner went out around the domain collecting them a few weeks ago. I had only tried them for the first time just before this, in a Périgourdine ommlette with potato, garlic and cèpes - delicious.

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We were given about a kilo of cepes on Monday, which I used to make a cepe omelette, mushroom soup, and mushroom sauce for the freezer.  Last night our builder turned up at the door at 9:30 bearing a whole crate of the beauties, so we spent the rest of the evening cleaning, chopping and freezing them.

This morning my other half arrived with 5 enormous cepe-like monsters that he'd found in our woods, but his pride was short-lived, as they turned out to be the poisonous boletus satanus (easy to identify, as they have a bright orange to red underside).

Cepes are so numerous here at the moment that we've turned down offers of  any more freebies, as we already have more than we know what to do with!

Our local hunter-gatherer tells me that the best time for mushroom hunting is after several days of moderate to heavy rainfall, depending on the species of mushroom.

 

 

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