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Joy of Cooking


PossumGirl

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I was wondering if this classic American cookbook is known in the UK?  It's considered the one "must have" in most American kitchens.  The original edition was written in the 30s, and it has been updated several times since, although thw 2000 update is generall considered an anathema by most people.

The new edition has just been published today and goes back to the earlier editions in content and style apparently.  Everything old is new again, and they've even put back chapters on canning and preserving, which they had taken out because people had stopped doing it. 

In my cleaning frenzy before moving, I got rid of my edition and have been regretting it ever since, so I ordered the new one at Amazon, and even with shipping, the pre-publication price made it a good deal.

This now makes 2 books I've had to replace because I foolishly gave them away/sold them before we moved...

PG

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[quote user="PossumGirl"]I was wondering if this classic American cookbook is known in the UK?  It's considered the one "must have" in most American kitchens.  The original edition was written in the 30s, and it has been updated several times since, although thw 2000 update is generall considered an anathema by most people.

The new edition has just been published today and goes back to the earlier editions in content and style apparently.  Everything old is new again, and they've even put back chapters on canning and preserving, which they had taken out because people had stopped doing it. 

In my cleaning frenzy before moving, I got rid of my edition and have been regretting it ever since, so I ordered the new one at Amazon, and even with shipping, the pre-publication price made it a good deal.

This now makes 2 books I've had to replace because I foolishly gave them away/sold them before we moved...

PG

[/quote]

How does this compare bargain-wise ?(sorry, not au fait with $ exchange rate)
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I think she probably was an American Mrs. Beeton, Catalpa.  At any rate, I particularly love the charts and things.  I'm thinking that it may prove useful when I'm trying to get my friends to understand some particular dish or technique that I'm trying to explain.

I like abebooks as well, although now one can often find things for which they're looking on ebay.  The other book I replaced, "Secrets of a Jewish Baker" was available for a great price on ebay, and I got it in less than 10 days.

For the "Joy of Cooking," with shipping, the price came to 19€! I didn't take the fastest shipping time, as it didn't seem worth it to pay the extra.

PG

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I wish we could get round to finally unpacking everything we brought with us nearly 4 years ago!  Not long now, when the barn is finished that  we'll be able to.  I have a book that an American friend got me from whatever is the equivalent to WI in New York state.  It's called "Applehood and Mother Pie" and has some wonderful "all American" recipes in it.
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I kind of enjoyed living here before the arrival of our "stuff," then when it was here while the renovations were going on, but with it all still in boxes, I did find myself "craving" the things that I knew were there but that I couldn't access.  It is nice being able to get to everything now though.

PG

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I was given the 'Joy of Cooking' many years ago by an American Friend.  I suppose it was around  1980.  There were some great recipes in it including Zucchini Relish - fantastic when you've got so many courgettes you don't know what to do with them!  Sadly it got left behind when I split with my spouse.............I wonder if he uses it?????
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Crud!  I just wrote a long and detailed response to this and the server returned an error before I could post it!

Okay, here goes again...

Brining is a technique used for meats that tend to dry out, like turkey and pork.  You soak the meat in a solution of salt, water and sugar for an hour to overnight (depending on what you're brining) and then cook as usual.  The salt solution enters the fibers of the meat, making it more juicy.

I've tried it and am not totally convinced.  It is a lot of work for what it seems to accomplish, in my opinion, and I am able to get juicy results withot it by using other cooking methods.

Here is a recipe for cooking a turkey from Recipezaar that you can try, also, Cook's Illustrated has several articles on it, but I think you need to be a subscriber to access most of them.

PG

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I have Joy of Cooking.   It even tells you how to skin a squirrel, but I don't have the right shape of boots, so I've never done it.

To tell you the truth, I haven't used it much at all.   It's the measurements.   A cup of butter?   No way do I measure butter in cups.   Or sticks, or anything else. 

I wish the cooking world would get rid of cups!   Just weigh things!  

 

 

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