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Foie Gras cooking query


Lindnarden

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Not a huge consumer of the above but we are having some on Xmas day - having not the first clue about it I have bought a block of stuff in a vacuum pack out of the fridge in the supermarket......it is,  by all accounts, 'avec morceaux'.....which is nice

This may sound like a stupid question but are we supposed to cook it or slice it straight from the packet ?

[8-)]

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If it was vacuum packed, and in the refrigerated section, I would think that it is a whole raw fois gras.  Is it long and flatish, about the size and shape of a magret de canard, and a uniform beige colour?

I usually slice it and fry it lightly (no need to use oil in the pan, it will give off loads).  Fry a few thin slices of apple, drizzled with icing sugar, in a little butter to eat with it... lovely!

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No, it looks like it has ben processed in some way - ie not a shape usually associated with a sentient being (for want of a better description, a small railway tunnel)

The label says - 'Bloc de foie gras de canard de sud ouest avec morceaux' or words to that effect.

The monbazillac is already chilling....as is half a bottle of sauternes for emergencies

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The foie gras. I have always been put off by the feeding pratices ( typical soft meat eater) and I am not looking to spark a debate about that, but I always wondered if it was really THAT good or just something that the French liked to boast about. [:)]

If it's good enough for discerning British tastebuds , I will give it a try.

Is there a beginners one, a must have or one to avoid?

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Our local restaurant does two fantastic Foie gras starters - one a 'chaud/froid' ie a cold slice and a lightly fried slice with an onion confit, and an absolutely delicious, I'm salivating as I write, apple crumble with a some warm foie gras in the middle. Fabulous!!

Chris

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Beryl - I love it all.  It's not something to gorge on - too rich.  Duck or goose makes no real difference to me (okay - I prefer duck).  Best is foie entier, otherwise avec morceaux.  You generally get what you pay for.  NB If you hate liver paté of all kinds, you probably won't find it anything to rave about.  But the taste is more subtle than you might expect.

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There seemingly is universal acclaim for the eating of Foie Gras and I absolutely respect the rights of fellow human beings to do exactly that.  However there are those who do not agree with the practice of force feeding and very obviously those of you who love eating Foie Gras would equally respect the contrary views.

This is not intended to create a 'storm' for we all differ on religions on politics and whatever and it is just not for me.  (eating Foie Gras that is)  However I do eat chicken liver pate but only with the livers being soaked in brandy for a little time and with myself doing the cooking.  So I suppose I am a hypocrite but that depends whether of not the livers come from chickens who enjoy freedom or those unhappy chickens whose 'lives' 'develop' in huge hangars.  I have now decided I am a hypocrite for I do not know how the chickens spent their lives.  I suspect not either on a bio basis or free range.

To one and all a very happy time over the holiday period.

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[quote user="Patf"]When you say it's too rich do you mean it's greasy? I suppose it must be if it's "gras". If so no good for me on my low cholesterol diet. I love plain chicken liver pate though. Pat.

[/quote]

No, not at all greasy.  Just rich.  Like you wouldn't eat a whole Xmas cake or Xmas pudding at one sitting for the same reason.  Well, I wouldn't. [:)]

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[quote user="Frederick"]I read recently that tons of Foie Gras comes from Hungary  where it is cheaply produced and then  it's re packaged in France and sold on  .......I always thought of France when Foie Gras was mentioned .but appently its big business in Hungary too .[/quote]

If is says processed in France but product of the EC then it may come from abroad, some from Hungary.  But almost all French foie gras is home grown.

I think you may be referring to the BBC "news" article which also takes the opportunity to have the customary sideswipe at the French by saying the "well known brands" in France import their foie gras from Hungary, yet in its footnote adds that 90% of French foie gras is homegrown and the percentage imported from abroad is decreasing.

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[quote user="Llwyncelyn"]

There seemingly is universal acclaim for the eating of Foie Gras and I absolutely respect the rights of fellow human beings to do exactly that.  However there are those who do not agree with the practice of force feeding and very obviously those of you who love eating Foie Gras would equally respect the contrary views.[/quote]

Never force feed anyone foie gras.  [:)]
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[quote user="Frederick"]I read recently that tons of Foie Gras comes from Hungary  where it is cheaply produced and then  it's re packaged in France and sold on  .......I always thought of France when Foie Gras was mentioned .but appently its big business in Hungary too .[/quote]

I read that too and that they only use the male ducks and geese.  The female ducklings and goslings, which are uneconomic to bother to raise, are chucked alive into a shredder as they are sexed.[:@]

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I think you may be referring to the BBC "news" article which says

the well known brands in France import their foie gras from Hungary,

yet in its footnote adds that 90% of French foie gras is homegrown and

the percentage imported from abroad is decreasing.

PS It did not mention anything about shredding birds alive - maybe there is another article I missed.

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"The female ducklings and goslings, which are uneconomic to bother to raise, are chucked alive into a shredder as they are sexed."

Although I don't know personally whether or not this is true, I do know that there are uneconomic cockerels produced in battery egg production. I'm not entirely sure how they are killed. I do know that I used to buy them by the bin liner full when I was keeping owls. I used to freeze them in small numbers.

We all have own ideas abot what constitutes cruelty don't we ?

In the UK I won't buy supermarket chicken or eggs. In the Dordogne I'm quite happy to buy locally produced foie gras.

Hoddy
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