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boiling bones for soup


Sunshine

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Hi

I am assuming it is possible to make a broth from boiling the OS bones I bought from Carrefour.  However there was a fair mixture of different bones which may have included some from the back bone.  This morning I started to think about CJD.

All the water has turned into a thick jelly, which it would do because of the gelatine, but does not look very appertising.  I know this will improve when heated and put with the vegatables. 

Do I continue with my broth?.  Or do I mooooooove it to the bin?

 

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I use chicken carcasses to make stock and often if I leave them overnight they are jelly. As a child my mother always assured me that if it went to jelly it was 'good stuff'.

I don't know whether I would use other animal bones for stock though these days, but I would have supposed that the stock would go to jelly too. In the past I have boiled pigs trotters to make jelly for my pork pies, but haven't made them in years.

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" I use chicken carcasses to make stock and often if I leave them overnight they are jelly. As a child my mother always assured me that if it went to jelly it was 'good stuff'. "

 

Tu

I have just done this and yes it turned to jelly overnight so I brought it all up to the boil and then strained off the stock from the bones. It made excellent soup and tasted of lemon as well as I had roasted the chicken with a lemon inside and cooked it in a chicken brick.........delicious, and cheap at the price.

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I have made a soup for the last 25 years from a chicken carcass as well as Duck and Goose.  I do this with big chunky veg, fresh bread and the taste is great.  and its very cheap to make.  I have served it up for guests!  

However the bones I used did not stipulate which animal.  I think there may have been some veal bones as the flesh was very light.  As with the chicken, I cooked the bones for a few hours with no vegatables.  This way it is easier to remove any unwanted grissle, fat and small bones.    

Not sure if I should give it to the dog.  As she was reluctant to eat the marrow bones!...

 

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Hi many years ago I watched a TV programme and where Albert and Michel Roux did white chicken stock.  Is it called here fond de vollaile?

Both used a veal foot to give the stock some 'body.'  Albert Roux was the old-fashioned 'high temple' approach to French cuisine.  Michel did it using a pressure cooker and in 45 minutes.

For Xmas I was given a modern pressure cooker (the ones that allegedly will not blow up) and since then I have been using it to make chicken and fish stock as well as beef and veal stock and finally demi glace.

It really does make for a wonderful stock as against the conventional eight hours or longer for the demi glace.  Back in the UK I used to do it the old fashioned way but then we were on mains gas.

rdgs

 

 

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llwyncelyn

veal's foot and demi glace; that definitely makes a difference from cawl, boy.  joking apart, none of this is much good to me as my husband does not eat meat and, to avoid cooking 2 different soups, i just settle for marigold bouillon and vegetables! 

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But..............I love cawl but cannot match my late mother in that direction..........and this was in the 50's and 60's and she was a magician in that area.  It is very much the case that all Mums (Mothers) of that era be they in Durham Yorkshire Derbyshire Kent or wherever had to organise themselves to feed their families and when there were not many pennies coming through the front door.  It had a marked impression upon my upbringing.  However faggots and peas with gravy and then home made apple tart in Pontypridd market was entirely another thing!    Of course the starter was cockles.......................

Sorry off thread..............

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llywyncelyn

nevermind cawl or cockles or faggots and peas, do you really like laverbread?  be honest now, boy, i eat most things but laverbread is something else!

nevermind, i'll send you some welsh cakes, made on my husband's mother's griddle, ok?

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