Jump to content
Complete France Forum

english food ideas for a gift


cowoman

Recommended Posts

Hello,We have just had a great 2 weeks in our newly bought house.The neighbours were so friendly and have promised to cut our very large garden another 2 times and strim it as well.They wouldnt take any money so we thought we would buy them something to say thankyou.O H said we could buy Whiskey but I thought we could buy some English bits and bobs and make up a basket.I am struggling to think what goodies we can buy for it so any ideas would be appreciated.I have got as far as thorntons toffee or chocolates maybe some shortbread and then I am stuck.Help me please if you can.Or if you have a better idea to say thanks I would love to consider it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My French friends seem to like savoury "biscuits for cheese" as they think it a bit of a change from bread.

They also love my Victoria sponge, especially when I fill it with strawberry jam.

Fudge is also much appreciated.

Will come back with other thoughts if you don't get many answers but I suspect that your thread could produce lots of stories as well as solutions to your problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good morning Cowoman!

When our dutch friend did us a huge favour I made up a basket of:

English Tea, ginger conserve and other nice jams, special mint sauce, luxury biscuits, horseradish sauce, fudge, scottish shortbread and finally luxury bubble bath (just make sure they don't take that the wrong way!!).

She thought it was wonderful.

Suey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

branston pickle , selection of teas, tiger bread (my neighbours go big time for this !!) brown sauce ,jellies (well worth the quizzling looks !!)sandwich spread, custard (ready made) tinned rice ,pork pies,sausage rolls , cheddar cheese (or a selection from your area) parsnips !!! ginger beer,cream soda or any of the flavoured pops which are dificult to get here you could actually make them a trifle (lovely stuff) the above is a small sample of the shopping that I have to do for my neighbours !!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fudge is always a winner, I have a neighbour who thinks it is just divine and guards it jealously from her friends who all want to taste!! 

Separately I once made a gift of some Christmas crackers to a family, who just didn't understand what to do with them as I don't believe they are available in France.  When I explained, they were surprised and dismayed "why do you have to break these pretty things?" and were very reluctant to pull them apart.  The paper hats went down a storm, as did the small plastic toy.  And the jokes, we ended up in stitches trying to translate the "Knock Knock", "Who's There" ... jokes and the riddles.  Now we always buy boxes of crackers and give them as gifts when we are invited for Xmas drinks, and they they are always appreciated as a novel, and very English, gift!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kendal Mint Cake is from the Lake District but can often be found in areas in England where walking is common, such as places in Derbyshire where people start walks from.  I believe it has a high sugar content for energy giving.  I think I've heard of mountaineers carrying it.  You can get it chocolate covered too.  It isn't a cake by the way, it's very solid, between a peppermint cream and a peppermint.

Other things I've given as gifts to foreigners, although this is not the time of the year for it, but you could consider it for later - Christmas Pudding, Rum/Brandy butter, Christmas cake, mincemeat - although I must admit, I wouldn't give bought mince meat, only home made, but I usually give home made pudding too.  I suppose any fruit cake at any time of year might be appreciated.  I don't recall having seen fruit cakes like English ones.  Sausage Rolls.  Bakewell PUDDING (not tart - completely different) - can be posted from the Bakewell pudding shop.

If your friends are adventurous, they might even appreciate something like Pataks curry pastes or sauces and pickles.

Harvey's Bristol Cream - I know it's Spanish, but it's not the same as French aperitifs - it's sort of English.  I don't know what sherry is like in Spain - or how it compares.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...