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Bread's done but, how do I get it out?


mint

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Have been the proud owner of a "promotion" breadmaker from Netto for more than a week now and it does look very nice, sitting on the work-top.

Don't think I've just been admiring it, however; I have baked 3 loaves in it.  Only problem is, the bread looks very nice in the tin, until I come to try and prise it out, and prise it out and prise it out.....................

Is it possible to get the bread out in less than the time it would have taken me to drive down to our village boulangerie and return with bread for breakfast?

If you know the secret, PLEASE share it with me!  It's not much fun eating bread that's been hacked about by me trying to squeeze it and cut it up whilst it's still inside the tin![:-))]

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Thanks for the laugh, guys. 

RH, "a very firm tap" hasn't actually achieved my objective.  In fact, a karate chop or two has only hurt my hand and the damned loaf is still firmly in its tin.

Could always use the mangled bits for breadcrumbs, I suppose.

 

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[quote user="Russethouse"]

Hold it upside down and give it a very firm tap, repeat as required [/quote]

Or several hundred sharp shakes and taps as required; which is why I only use our breadmaker in the winter as I become far too hot and flustered if I use it when the weather is warm.

Sue [8-)]

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[quote user="Lisleoise"]Or do as I did this morning after a disaster the other day: use the machine for the dough and then bake it in the oven [:)]

[/quote]

Me too - I gave up baking it in the tin long ago - now it does the dough, and into the oven the dough goes!  Let's it have another rise, and it's even better then!

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Sweet, I have the same problem with my very aged secondhand breadmaker. Perhaps a synthesis of most of the advice here would work (I find that it does for me eventually).

Do not even try to get the bread out when it is still very hot. Just tip the tin upside down onto a wooden board. Then when it has cooled a bit, and it doesn't seem to budge, I just whack (short and sharp) the tin onto the wooden board. And again. And again. And again. Eventually, one of us gives up.

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[quote user="5-element"]

Sweet, I have the same problem with my very aged secondhand breadmaker. Perhaps a synthesis of most of the advice here would work (I find that it does for me eventually).

Do not even try to get the bread out when it is still very hot. Just tip the tin upside down onto a wooden board. Then when it has cooled a bit, and it doesn't seem to budge, I just whack (short and sharp) the tin onto the wooden board. And again. And again. And again. Eventually, one of us gives up.

[/quote]

But, 5-e, what I want to know is, do you keep a sort of running tally as to whether you or the tin score/s the most times?

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I don't use a bread machine, so don't know if it's safe to line the tin with greaseproof paper, which would solve the problem.  I use liners in the tins to bake bread in the oven.

Or, use a long sharp knife to at least loosen the sides of the loaf.

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Mine was a non-stick version when it was in its prime. I got the tail end of it, and it barely carries the memory of non-stick.

Sweet, I am glad to report that so far, I have always won in the end...

I find the problem is when I haven't oiled/buttered all inside and outside the blade properly. Then the blade won't let go, and in the end the bread has to be prised off the blade itself. 

Pat, lining it wouldn't work because of the blade. The long sharp knife is OK for the sides (careful if you want to keep it non-stick) but doesn't help since it is the blade that holds the loaf in the end.

I am sure all this would sound like gobbledigook to anyone who has never used a breadmaker. I still find it worth having, though.

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Ah, I see - at least I think I see. So the mixing is done in the actual baking tin? With some sort of paddle -like blade?

So what happens to the blade when the loaf comes out? Do you have to chew around it?[:D]

Mixing by hand can be so quick and easy, and I make 4 loaves at a time instead of just one.

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Pat, I've tried doing it by hand.  In fact, I really enjoyed doing the kneading and it was very relaxing and therapeutic.

But, the results were always less than worth eating!

Have thought and thought about a breadmaker for months on end and finally succumbed when I saw it in Netto for €40.

Will try the upside-down-till-it-comes-out method.  The bread tonight BTW was superb so it's worth persevering!

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They are sometimes a bit of a pain those machines. There is a lovely smell of fresh bread in a morning when I get up but then I have to wait till the wife comes downstairs, gets the loaf out of the machine, cuts it, puts the jam on and serves it up with a cup of tea. She then has to clean the thing out and make it ready the next evening with the flour and other stuff.

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[quote user="Patf"]

Ah, I see - at least I think I see. So the mixing is done in the actual baking tin? With some sort of paddle -like blade?

So what happens to the blade when the loaf comes out? Do you have to chew around it?[:D]

[/quote]

Yep, sometimes. Theoretically the paddle stays in the tin but not always. It can be a bit of a faff to dig it out of the baked loaf so chewing around it is probably a good idea.

Like a few others here I only use the bread maker for mixing dough and then bake the loaf in the oven.

I recently bought a perforated loaf tin which enables you to bake baguette shaped bread. The perforations cause a little pattern on the underside of the loaf and one of my kids said recently "it looks just like you get in the Co-op".

Richard T

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[quote user="Jay"]They are sometimes a bit of a pain those machines. There is a lovely smell of fresh bread in a morning when I get up but then I have to wait till the wife comes downstairs, gets the loaf out of the machine, cuts it, puts the jam on and serves it up with a cup of tea. She then has to clean the thing out and make it ready the next evening with the flour and other stuff.

[/quote]

Sounds like you've got it sussed!

Richard T

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That's really nifty, Clair.

Got the bread out at last; with the OH hanging on to the tin whilst I got my fingers around the bread as far as they would go and pulling for all I was worth.

Now the loaf is out of the tin, I might be brave enough to try your brioche recipe later this week.  Don't fancy getting such a delicate thing out of the tin though so might give it some thought first!

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