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Rare liver at Raymond Blanc's


NormanH

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Err no, Norman.

But one sees liver on offer more frequently in the UK than here in France. Italian restaurants are the best bet.

I seek it out when over there and always ask for it to be done 'pink' - IMO its the only way to eat it. 

Provided the raw product isn't 'iffy' before being cooked, there's no reason why offal should be any different to (say) steak? 

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Does anyone else remember the nutritionist Adelle Davis, who advocated a diet with a lot of raw liver? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelle_Davis    She was  keen on high-protein diets long before Dr. Atkins & Co.

I had never noticed that liver was more available in the UK than in France. Here, I often see it at my butcher's, and when I was a child we used to have some once a week. Usually "foie de veau" or the cheaper "foie de génisse". Not much lamb's liver though.

 

(very sorry but suddenly I don't seem to be able to post a live link and can't remember how to enliven it...)

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[quote user="5-element"]

I had never noticed that liver was more available in the UK than in France. [/quote]

I didn't so much mean its availability in supermarkets and butchers, but it being on a restaurant menu over here. I also quite like kidneys as a change, but they're pretty uncommon too - again, to my mind they're completely spoiled if overcooked.

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[quote user="Pommier"]They must have been doing something wrong (bad meat or bad cooking) to make people ill. They were given the chance to mend their ways, but didn't. I don't see what else could be done.[/quote]

How many times do they have to be warned  ? Has somebody got to die before they accept their cooking methods are a danger to health  ?  They got what they deserved and now the publicity to go with it ... They should have taken the hint when it was quietly given ..not a good business decision to defy them was it .

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[quote user="5-element"]

Does anyone else remember the nutritionist Adelle Davis, who advocated a diet with a lot of raw liver? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelle_Davis    She was  keen on high-protein diets long before Dr. Atkins & Co.

I had never noticed that liver was more available in the UK than in France. Here, I often see it at my butcher's, and when I was a child we used to have some once a week. Usually "foie de veau" or the cheaper "foie de génisse". Not much lamb's liver though.

 

(very sorry but suddenly I don't seem to be able to post a live link and can't remember how to enliven it...)

[/quote]

High protein diets were used earlier than that to combat gout back in Victorian times, seems crazy that those lessons have almost been forgotten as the food industry powers it's way ahead but I digress.

5 E, try your compatibility icon to the right of the title bar (top of the screen) I had to use mine recently as text was disappearing outside of the box, maybe that's preventing you from posting a link.

It does seen strange that as most of you come from a country that historically cooked the living daylights out of all meat, moved to a country which barely warms the meat to the middle that you seem to enjoy taking up arms against a famous French man who for the most part cooks delicious food.

I agree that after warnings they should have looked much closer at their process's as something is wrong (freshness, storage, organic meat not being given antibiotics etc)

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YES!    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelle_Davis 

Thank you Théière... I must remember what a compatibility icon looks like in future....

By the way, what do people think about undercooked duck??? I was quite surprised when I realised this is definitely the way to eat it - given that all poultry is particularly prone to salmonella, campylobacter, clostridium (I think) and other nasties.

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I'd be interested in the answer too. In my country childhood duck had to be cooked very thoroughly and their eggs were only used for cakes.

On the subject of liver, it's worth remembering that it is not a good idea for older people to eat a great deal of it.

Hoddy
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It was my belief that all meats that are eaten 'red' or 'pink' should get to a certain temperature, which is a safe temperature, during the cooking process and the meat remains 'pink'. And that is why some people/chefs use a meat thermometer to check the middle, which should be what, approx 65°c, which is what comes to mind, without looking it up.....and could be off by a little bit.
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I've hated liver since I was small. When pregnant with our first son, I was found to be so anaemic that I had to have iron injections. They were rather nasty, involving an enormous needle stuck into my bottom. For days I had a metallic taste in my mouth. Liver might have done the trick, but I just couldn't manage to eat any. Still don't eat liver.

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I love liver and bacon with onion gravy.  But, alas, I don't fancy the gory business of cutting out all the "pipes" in the liver and since I now live in France, I no longer know anybody who would cook it for me.

BTW, I only like pig liver, not cow and not lamb.

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Sweet17, I would only eat pigs liver until I was given foie de genisse once in France and it was delicious. My local butcher would cut out any tubes, a job I'm not good at. It is cheap, so give it a try. I'd love to be able to buy it here, but the only butchers I know that sells it is in Harrogate and it is too far from here.
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