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Cooking help please


woolybanana

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Why do you want to know Wooly?

I would say they are both methods of tenderising food. Macerate, just with water, marinate some extra acid especially salt.

Macero - to soften , weaken

Marin... to do with sea/salt water

On xmas day we had eggs beans and chips, then fruit pie and custard.

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[quote user="Patf"]Why do you want to know Wooly?
I would say they are both methods of tenderising food. Macerate, just with water, marinate some extra acid especially salt.
Macero - to soften , weaken
Marin... to do with sea/salt water
On xmas day we had eggs beans and chips, then fruit pie and custard.
[/quote]

Oh, Pat, wish I could have sent you my husband!  For him, that would have been a perfect meal!

I had magret de canard (as discussed here a few weeks ago), OH had mashed potato, parsnip and tinned red bean burgers (made them dipped in flour, egg and home-made breadcrumbs)  and a plum crumble and cream for dessert.

Only trouble, I fell in the neighbours' drive (went to feed their cat whilst they were away) and, by the time I got back to my kitchen, the duck was incinerated!

It was a grotty day here, incessant rain, wind, etc so there was no incentive to go anywhere....

Still, got a whole year now to get over it before the next one![:)]

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Only trouble, I fell in the neighbours' drive (went to feed their cat whilst they were away) and, by the time I got back to my kitchen, the duck was incinerated!

Dare we assume that you had been at the Harvey's Bristol Cream from rather early in the morning, Sweets?

So, to complicate matters, your duck was incarcerated and your goose was cooked, or is this your inebriate state being incoherent?

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QUOTE. RH

If you want to soften Angela up perhaps a few sweet nothing's would do the trick ;-)

I don't know about "sweet NOthings", RH, but Christmas in Brussels has resulted in a lot of sweet SOMEthings being ingested by me, in the way of delicious Belgian chocolates...

Angela

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[quote user="woolybanana"]

Only trouble, I fell in the neighbours' drive (went to feed their cat whilst they were away) and, by the time I got back to my kitchen, the duck was incinerated!

Dare we assume that you had been at the Harvey's Bristol Cream from rather early in the morning, Sweets?

So, to complicate matters, your duck was incarcerated and your goose was cooked, or is this your inebriate state being incoherent?

[/quote]

No, you naughty banana, I wasn't drunk, at least not when I fell at about 11 am!  Bristol Cream....hm, yes, sherry is one thing that I do miss.  And pineau is just NOT the same, is it?

Anyway, after having provided 4 lots of apéros to different groups of people during the course of the week, I am now as tired as a newt, and I  don't care if I never see a single neighbour, friend, or family member ever again![:'(]

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Well, I love it when I learn something new. If I had seen macerate on a recipe, I would have put it in the blender, or hit it or squashed it, and not steeped or marinated it.

 

If you are wondering why, well, the only thing I can ever remember seeing that word mentioned, is on  a Saniflow and that has a sort of built-in caca-malaxeur, which I assume minces it all up.

 

Thanks wooly[:D] I could well have ruined a dish.

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Agree, id, I'd have bashed it about with my rolling pin!

BTW, I now make divine pastry, with mascarpone cheese, as per your recommendations.

I am very proud of the 2 dozen mini quiches or tartlets that I produced today.  Crispy and yummy.......[:D]

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Have you tried Maury sweet17? It tastes fortified, a bit like a cross between sherry and port. So when I couldn't get sherry, found it to be a half decent replacement.

Glad that you like the pastry. I made some up last week, for mince pies, which have gone down well.

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Maury?  Never heard of it, id.  Which département is it made and is it readily available in supermarkets?

I now feel very comfortable with making your pastry and, despite my rubbishy oven, it comes out just fine.  I usually make it up the night before so that it can rest overnight and, the next day, it's a cinch just to make quiches, tartlets, whatever, with no hassle.

What I really love is that it bakes so well with no shrinkage and I know exactly what the results are going to be like! 

Eventually, I made a fruit cake which didn't have time to mature but I doused it well in whisky (no brandy in the house) and everybody gobbled every bit up and I'd used up the last of the glacé cherries I brought from the UK and I am reluctant to make another cake because glacé cherries are soooo expensive in France![:(]

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I think that Maury is available everywhere. It is a vin doux and I suspect it is from the SW, but I really am not sure of that. I would say it would be with the likes of Martini in the supermarket. I think worth a try. And if you don't like it, you can eventually use it up in sauces[Www]
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Maury?  Never heard of it, id.  Which département is it made and is it readily available in supermarkets?

It is made not far from here on the border between Aude and the Pyrénées Orientales, in Cathar Castle country to the south of the Corbières:

 see

http://vigneronsdemaury.com/  near the magnificent site of Quéribus (I prefer to turn off the sound)

A well-known producer that I often see available  is Mas Amiel

It makes a good substitute for sherry, both as an apéritif and in recipes as does Banyuls (from further south again)

I have drunk unreasonable quantities of both in earlier days ...

Another  vin doux that you see everywhere, but is of a lower quality, is Rivesaltes

A local dish is Poulet au Rivesaltes
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For me Maury is a good substitute for sherry. Whereas Rivesaltes, is a drink I enjoy but is a vin doux that has it's 'own' taste. I drink so little that I still have a bottle of fait maison Rivesaltes that our neighbour's father gave us, made by his friend down south. That was a few years ago, and I can only hope that it 'keeps'!

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[quote user="woolybanana"]

"I have drunk unreasonable quantities of both in earlier days ..."

Bobo, but it must be horrible to be a reformed drunk, Norman!

[/quote]

But when one regards those who are still fallen it gives one a wonderful sense of superiority....till the next time.

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