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Welsh Words.


Just Katie

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I am sitting here with my mates and we have realised that us Welshies have strange words for things.  But then I wondered if they are Welsh words or if everyone uses them. 

Twp - thick, dopey, silly. Ewe are twp ewe are.

Tump - lots of, a big pile of. I ad a tump of curry last night I did.

Cwch - Under the stairs, cuddle. Its in the cwch.  Give us a cwch babe.

Pooer Dahb - Poor thing. Let me kiss it better... ahhh you pooer dahb.

Mwchin - Pig. Uch you dutty mwchin

Aesht - Shut up. Aesht mun.

Dutty - Dirty. Uch U dutty mwchin.

By yer - Here. Come by yer now.

Goyin - Going. Wer u goyin?

Buthere - There. Its over buthere mun!

 

 

 

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If they are Welsh language words then non-Welsh speakers wouldn't be likely to use them - the pattern of borrowing between Welsh and English is the other way.

If they aren't Welsh language then they would be some sort of dialect form of English, possibly quite local. Again, people outside of the area will be as baffled by them as I am!

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I am surprised you are baffled.  They are used in every day spoken englise over byer in the hills.[:D]. 

My London cousins tell me that the first few hours they spend with me, they cannot understand me and it takes a while to "tune into" my accent. 

I adore regional accents and was very surprised during a visit to the Pyrenees that I understood French and thought that I had greatly improved.  However, I was then told that Frenchies of the Midi (where Twinkle lives) and where I regularly visit, have the equivalent of Glaswegion accents and that those from the Pyrenees prounounce all of their words.

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[quote user="Just Katie "]Potch - To tamper with things; potato and swede mashed together. Will ewe stop potching with that by there.   Do you want potch with ewer sausage?[/quote]

Sorry - for a second I thought you said "Do you want to potch with ewer sausage?"[:-))]

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and there is :

Cariad            My dear, my sweet

Bach              (as in Johan Sebastian BAHRRR) another endearing way for saying dear / sweet / my little sausage as the French would say 'mon petit chou'

Yr-y-fi!            (aahrrr è vie!)  for describing something or a feeling  utterly disgusting!!

Beth!?           What!?...

Pam?           Why?...

Barod?          Ready?

Pob lwc!!        Good luck to all

Hwyl Fawr!!              Having or have a great time

Dim problem!          Pas de problème

 

.... what else....

 

 

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[quote user="Dick Smith"]If they are Welsh language words then non-Welsh speakers wouldn't be likely to use them - the pattern of borrowing between Welsh and English is the other way.

If they aren't Welsh language then they would be some sort of dialect form of English, possibly quite local. Again, people outside of the area will be as baffled by them as I am!
[/quote]

 

These words/expressions are used widely and everyday by Welsh people who have had a smuttering of Welsh in their lives but where English was/is predominently spoken in their lives. Especialy the younger generation and people living near England and Offa's Dyke and me [:$].... 

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[quote user="Missy"]

[quote user="Dick Smith"]If they are Welsh language words then non-Welsh speakers wouldn't be likely to use them - the pattern of borrowing between Welsh and English is the other way.

If they aren't Welsh language then they would be some sort of dialect form of English, possibly quite local. Again, people outside of the area will be as baffled by them as I am!
[/quote]

 

These words/expressions are used widely and everyday by Welsh people who have had a smuttering of Welsh in their lives but where English was/is predominently spoken in their lives. Especialy the younger generation and people living near England and Offa's Dyke and me [:$].... 

[/quote]

 

Now... why is it that this Offa's D*ke gets ***!! It's a di/yke as in the flemish/dutch trench type dug out to separate the unruly on the eastern side of it and the civilised people on its western part of it! [:-))] Looking North all the time[;-)] mind.....

Only sheep have tendencies to dykism [Www] I am told....[:$]

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[quote user="Just Katie "]Missy, I notice many of the words you have posted ARE actual welsh words which the english speaking welsh use everyday in comparison to my post which are more of a slang and a poor use of the english language.[/quote]

It's probably because I use them frequently in some context or other as I am surrounded with mainly Welsh people at work and it comes into their conversations ......

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Yes Dick, all of my postings are a slangy dialect.  However, most of Missys are the actual Welsh language.

Also, is it just me or does anyone else find American films increasingly difficult to understand with all the gangsterlike mumbly kind of spoken english? 

I find I have got to keep rewinding to get what they are saying.

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I find all this fascinating. I thought that 'mither' was a Derbyshire dialect word for worry. There is also an old method of counting - yan, tan, tethera, fethera etc which I can't remember all of now. I bet somebody somewhere has done a study and earned themselves a Ph.D.

And a big yes to finding American films increasingly difficult to understand.

 

Hoddy

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