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Late life crisis looming......


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Me and Wiggy are doing a classic bike ride tomorrow.  About 70 entrants (we tag onto the back) - meet up in our local salle de fetes for free croissants and coffee....set off and ride round the lanes for a bit....rock up at a big lakeside picnic area for an enormous 11 o'clock brunch.....ride a bit further on to a restaurant for lunch.....set off again for the return home.  You know how it goes.

As a prelude, I spent a couple of hours this afternoon at my local bike shop chatting with a bunch of Royal Enfield owners, all looking forward to tomorrows' ride out (Bernard the bike shop owner imports them from India). One talking point was whether I should sell my modern BMW and buy an oldie, and as you would imagine, the concensus was yes.

Although I've downsized from my big old Pan to the lighter BMW, I find I'm using it less and less these days.  The advantage of having an old classic is that there are meet-ups most Sundays and the 'crack' is good, so I think I'd be more inclined to get out on the road more often.

Question is, do I give up my modern electronics, high performance fuel injection, modern suspension and ABS disc brakes and go back to tweaking carburettors, cleaning and oiling chains etc.

Anyone care to give me a little push....[;-)]

From this:

[IMG]http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w4/r850r/R850R-1.jpg[/IMG]

To this....

[IMG]http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w4/r850r/RE.jpg[/IMG]

 

 

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Aw, go on, you know you want to![6]

 

Some time in the future, I'm hoping that I will be able to treat myself to a really nice set of (4) wheels.  I keep telling myself that I must go for something sensible and modern but I just know that, if I get the chance, I'll end up with an old Porker.  One of the great attractions, for me, will be the ability to do classic car stuff which nothing modern - however fast and fun - will ever qualify for.  That bike will give you access to far more than just the open road, let's face it.

Go on, go on...

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[quote user="Sunday Driver"] Anyone care to give me a little push....[;-)] [/quote]

No contest really, although you might need a push one day with the enfield, and start calling it the Royal Oilfield,
the classic crack is what it's all about, one question could give your answer, have you had the BM flat in top this year yet?
I think you'll probably try the enfield flat in top at least once, less money draining away than the BM and with a local shop removing dirty maintenance what's not to enjoy . . .

of course get a decent rideout trial on a shop bike first, that way if it's not for you, well no harm done[;-)]

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Stick with the BM.

The trouble with nostalgia is it's rubbish. The notion that an old bike will bring back those heady days of youth and get closer to 'the good old days' is a bit of a chimera.

If you prefer outside plumbing, no central heating, food rationing, bad fashion and no internet then go for the oldie!
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[quote user="Sunday Driver"]

, I find I'm using it less and less these days.  [/quote]

I'm no biker but surely, if you want modern convenience and comfort you buy a car?  It's the bit above from Sunday's post which struck me.  If there's no magic there, then what the **** is the point?

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Nostalgia not what it used to be.

I'd agree with Devon. Go for an airhead BMW (R75/6 for example) It will do everything the R850R will do with, perhaps, a little more fettling (owner involvement) between times, you'll be able to go on the classic runs and it won't be depreciating whilst sitting in the garage
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I think that you already know the answer to your dilemma [;-)]

As you say it's all about the crack so anything which gets you out and about more has to be the way to go, no question. So what if it means a bit of grease under the fingernails once in a while, it's all part of the fun.

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  • 3 weeks later...
hi

an old biker friend who hasn't had a bike for a long time recently visited india and had some great fun with his wife on the back of a re 350. He even said it leaked oil! I'm trying to get him to buy another bike for use in the uk where he lives (nothumberland). I sold my scooter a burgman 400, kept at our french holiday home, last year and just recently bought a honda cb250 1998, for the uk I'm actually sending my friend links to similar ones for sale. For around a grand you can get an almost immaculate traditionally styled commutor/cruiser, I for one don't like the styling of most modern bikes. A 250 will have to do, I find driving in the uk very trying, will pick my routes, mainly secondary roads through yorkshire, durham, cumbria and northumberland. If I graduate to a bigger bike again, I would look at a s/h bmw cs650 single. One thing I don't like is weight, the little honda is less than 140kg, 200kg is too much for me. I would never have a big bike, only ever got up to a 500 in my youth and it was too fast for me then. I just love being on two wheels.
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If you must buy an Enfield at least buy an original one.

I think you would be better off with one of these and you will never lose money on one.

[IMG]http://i823.photobucket.com/albums/zz152/wynkindeworde/BMR69s.jpg[/IMG]
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Each to their own. I prefer a modern BMW 'cos, fingers crossed :), it gets me from A to B with minimum fuss. I have toured all over Europe and farther (Morocco thru to central Turkey, Crete thru to Germany) in all weather. When it is cold then thank you for heated seats and handlebars, when it is hot then thank you for electrically adjustable screen to keep the bugs out of my face, when it is raining ... Thank you for all the above and ABS :) Riding continuous for some 35 years I have worked up from crotch rockets (Ducati), thru Sports Tourers (VFR) to my last 2 bikes (R1150RT and now R1200RT). Everybody will find the bike that suits their needs and brings a smile to their face ... whether for a local nimble or a blast across continents.

Vern
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The Fonz didn't ride!!!  Henry Winkler couldn't ride, and any shots of him on a bike, he'd be pushed, and roll into shot. You'll never see a shot of him on a bike with any audio, as the bike wasn't running!

As an aside, the bike he's on during the opening titles, is in his garage, he brought it from the film company when he found out it was THE bike used by Steve McQueen in the Great Escape!!

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