Jump to content
Complete France Forum

Scrapers (for wood turning)


Deimos

Recommended Posts

When I was originally taught wood turning I seem to remember being taught on occasions using scrapers. From memory it was normally on the inside of bowls and not all the time. I remember not liking them and not being very good at bowls. I also remember the shavings that come off were not particularly "clean" and they never felt like they were cutting properly (for want of a better word).

I noticed today that my turning tool selection does not include any scrapers. Does anybody else use scrapers or are they best forgotten about ?

Ian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree in that I find then fantastic on e.g. a table top. However, on wood turning one i often going across the grain which makes them less effective (at least I always thought so) - but I was taught to use them and those doing the teaching knew far more about it that I do.

I must confess that these days I have started using a belt sander more (and I would insert one of those embarrassed little faces here but my browser doesn't do those).

Ian
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a large difference in the scraper that's used for flat wood and for turning. Have a look at the site below. The turners scraper is not my favorite tool for some of the reasons that Ian mentioned, but I do use a round nosed one when I have to (not often) When I'm turning a bowl, goblet, vase, etc. I start it with a spindle gouge and then go onto a bowl gouge when it gets a bit deeper. The scraper is a last resort. I have always found that a gouge is easier to use and gives a far better finish.

If I have a difficult bit of wood, lots of knots, varying grain and the like a bit of 'power sanding' comes in handy. That includes the inside of bowls. The setup I have is my trusty Black/Decker drill in what was the drill stand for my original drill/lathe. It has a flex drive in the chuck with a 2 inch sanding disk on the end. Start the lathe, the drill and my dust extractor and sand the spinning work. Because it's all spinning you don't get scratch marks from the abrasive, it takes any gouge marks out very quickly and when you go to finer grades you get a lovely finish, tres facile... Purists would rip my tounge out, but it don't 'arf work well... And I am always a purist, sometimes?

http://www.axminster.co.uk/recno/4/product-Henry-Taylor-Henry-Taylor-Scrapers-22351.htm .

If you are doing spindle work Ian. The best tool to use, when you can, is a skew gouge. It gives a lovely finish, but a buggger to use until you get used to it. Wonderfully satisfying  though. They work especially well if you have to turn any dowls, like the ones I turned for the rolling rattle I showed a short while ago, I think it was on the 'Ladder framing' thread.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's wrong with a belt sander Deimos? It's an efficient tool. Are you one of those who are under the spell of the old school train of thought...'my way is best 'cos that's the way it is'? Do you feel guilty because you use techniques that the old boys who taught you knew nothing about? Rollocks I say.

If it shifts wood and gets you to where you want to go then do it. Personally if I had to chew a piece of wood for a month to get where I wanted to go I'd do it.

I've had many converations with old woodworkers, whilst I completely appreciate their skill and history I dont appreciate their 'my way is best 'cos it's the way it's always been done' mentality, my father being one of them.

Once in Pennsylvania I said to an old freind of mine...."Bill...how do I carve an Eagle?, he replied in his deep Texan drawl 'Welll Chris, all ya gotta do is stand that there log up and take off all the wood that aint an eagle...'   The lesson stuck.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like it, like it!!! Mind you I alwayz thought there was an eagle in every bit of wood. What a lovely thought.

I was once asked by a young lad as to how I knew there was a cup in that peice of wood. It really puts you in your place and as you say, the lesson stuck!

I am looking for an old knackered desk fan. The general idea is to use the motor to drive a flex drive to do my power sanding because the drill is so bruddie noisy. It doesn't take a lot of touque so it should work a treat. You may like to think about it for your fine detail Chris. No where near as vicious as a big disk sander and easy to use.

I like the other thread you are running about the oak you have cut. 10 to 12% sounds just about right for a nice turning job. Not too dry, but not too much movement. That bit of kit for taking the round bits off? I saw one of those in action at Westonbirt and it was very impressive. Sorry, I should have put this in that fred?? Too tired, knight, knight, snore!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You ain't finkin straight me mate.. Knew ones are good for fans, old ones are good for the motor and they are normally stronger than the newer ones tooo. All I want is a quiet life and my old Black/Decker drill is hellish noisey. Keeps me awake!

By the way Chris, my new Axminster cataloug arrived today and they have some new cutters for Dremels in there that you may well be interested in. Have a look at their web site www.axminster.co.uk and look at the miniture drills bit. There is some nice kit in there. Diamond cutting disks for not a lot. Let me know what you think please.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re: Belt sanders

I'm doing a lot of panelling in the house at the moment (not carpentry but lining the bottom meter of so of walls with an decent air gap). To keep costs down and as I'm painting the stuff (by choice as a wood finish would definitely be too dark and too much) I'm buying sawn planks for the tops and, as I want to loose as little thinness as possible I'm belt sanding them smooth. I have a hand power plane but nothing big enough to plane the timber, plus planing it would lose too much. Seems to work belt sanding it but it always strikes me as a "bit of a bodge".

Also, when I do table tops I tend to glue and peg (dowel) the boards together (I don't have one of those flashy special router bits (yet). Boards are never properly straight and I never get the decently lined-up so again I end up belt sanding them and it is very difficult to get the finish flat (smooth yes but flat not so great). Not the end of the world as its just "rough" in cheap timber stuff at the moment to last until I get time to start making something decent. Plus, when the tables (or whatever) are finished they are fine.

Ian
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...