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Any ideas?


Chris Head

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This is a sketch of a carved CD storage unit I'm going to do.

The timber will probably start at a depth of 15 - 17 cm, a width of maybe 50 - 60cm and 1,80 - 2,00m in height.

The easy bit is the carving, the hard bit...  is making the slots for the CDs.

 The front edge of slots for the CDs will be recessed perhaps 5 - 7cm back from the carving, the idea being that the front edges of the CDs are roughly in line with the carving surface whilst the main structure of the CD storage is recessed.

SO! How on earth do I machine the slots through to the back of the timber at an angle of 10 - 15 degrees? Chainsaw and chiselling is the very last option, accuracy is just vital, anything less than perfection would detract from the piece. I'm a bit stuck here.

[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v609/chrishead/DSC01398.jpg[/IMG]

It's Eagle morphing into tree roots and who knows what else....

TIA

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You won't be able to carve the slots and leave shelves, surely?  So if you carve a square recess about 10mm narrower than a CD case and then cut back a series of grooves on either side to the full width and height of a case, that would work - but is it possible? Realistically, obviously anything is possible.

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Adding to Anton's idea - how about this.

Make a jig that can be clamped to the front over the area to be cut away so that you can work perpendicular to the surface.

Make a template to go over this area which has 2 series of holes, like the ends of rungs on a ladder, wide enough apart to fit a CD case and of a diameter to take a router collar. As many rows of holes as you have room for, but the distance between the rows must be a CD case plus some.

Using a router plunge into each hole, remove jig. Then, using a similar diameter drill bit deepen each hole to almost the depth of a CD case. You now have 2 vertical lines of holes. Cut a well inside the lines of holes, including half the diameter of the holes. The stubs left behind between the holes will support the CD cases which should slip into the two opposite holes in each rung.

Might work!

Edit - cross posted. I think they might come up with something this complicated, or else Dave's solution!

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Get a calendar sweetheart - it's actually Saturday!

I don't know - I could be doing anything I please.  Hubby's working, daughter's sleeping at a friends house and here I am talking about smelly duvets and dodgy Ikea CD racks with a bunch of losers.

I love you all dearly losers[:)]

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[quote user="Dick Smith"]Adding to Anton's idea - how about this.

Make a jig that can be clamped to the front over the area to be cut away so that you can work perpendicular to the surface.
Make a template to go over this area which has 2 series of holes, like the ends of rungs on a ladder, wide enough apart to fit a CD case and of a diameter to take a router collar. As many rows of holes as you have room for, but the distance between the rows must be a CD case plus some.

Using a router plunge into each hole, remove jig. Then, using a similar diameter drill bit deepen each hole to almost the depth of a CD case. You now have 2 vertical lines of holes. Cut a well inside the lines of holes, including half the diameter of the holes. The stubs left behind between the holes will support the CD cases which should slip into the two opposite holes in each rung.

Might work!


Edit - cross posted. I think they might come up with something this complicated, or else Dave's solution!
[/quote]

Mmmm, I think I understand, in fact that sounds like a good starting point. What about the slight angle needed? This is a toughie!

Dave....did you really say 'plastic'? Wash your mouth out and go chat with the Ikea crowd!

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'Hassle' is the wrong word Dick, initial frustration maybe but the excitement of knowing something unique will be born is, well...exciting! Airing problems is just great, sometimes one gets 'blocked', all it takes are fresh thoughts to get the ideas flowing again. A client saw my current piece, she asked which particular illegal substances I was taking, Sarah and neighbour are suggesting psychiatry.[:-))]
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[quote user="Chris Head"]

[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v609/chrishead/DSC01398.jpg[/IMG]

It's Eagle morphing into tree roots and who knows what else....

TIA

[/quote]

How's about this Chris?

[IMG]http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f180/Jonzjob/Eaglecomplete.jpg[/IMG]

Cut the wood into 3 bits, as above with a band saw. The center part is then turned on it's side and the CD slots can be marked carefully and cut. After the slots are done all that needs is to glue it back together. The original cuts will take up any slack and because the pieces are being glued back as they were cut the original cuts don't have to be tooo acurate. It will work and any band saw above a small hobby machine will be able to handle that size of oak. Then do the carving. Once that is done you will be hard pushed to find the joins...

You will need a band saw so that the kerf is not too big, also unless you can cut slots VERY acurately with your chain saw it will be difficult to cut the slots for the CDs. To cut the slots with a band saw just cut down both top and bottom and then go back in on either cut and join the top and bottom cuts with a curved cut. You will then be able to take the piece out and finish the slot with a few more careful curved cuts. Dead easy and only you will know how it was done. It leaves a nice squared hole for the CDs.

Good luck...

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