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Kitchen Project


Dick Smith

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I knocked this up last week:

[IMG]http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f338/dick_at_aulton/Cupboard.jpg[/IMG]

It's a beech spice cupboard, made to match exactly our existing Hygena units, so it is meant to be a straightforward Shaker design. It was good to work in solid hardwood, and I got to use a couple of new planes and a scraper instead of sandpaper...

I did mess up the door frame, and had to remake it after some very heavyweight advice from a woodworking forum!

Finish is umpteen coats of Danish oil rubbed down with an old shirt.

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The woodwork is one of the things that makes all the other stuff worthwhile. I haven't been at it long, and I'm still pretty amateur, but it gives a great sense of satisfaction to actually make something.

I try to use hand tools as much as possible, but I'll make an exception in the case of the router and biscuit jointer!

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Nowadays, I find myself agreeing with you quite a lot about quite a lot.  It is wonderful to make something.  That is why I have taken to cooking with a vengeance since I have lived in France.  It's so nice to make, say, a delicious cake and eat it with someone.

When we first came, I used a paint brush, for the first time ever in my life, and emulsioned the whole house. That was also profoundly satisfying.  Never thought I'd enjoy working so hard, spending hours on a ladder when I used to be scared of heights.

 

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I do a lot of cooking as well. Tonight I made sugar-free blackcurrant and apple crumble. Jolly nice it was, too!

In recent times, though, the cooking has been getting simpler and simpler, rather than the elaborate stuff we used to think was impressive!

What I haven't really got into yet is gardening, although I love sitting in them. No choice soon, as the garden in France beckons.

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Looks good Dick, how many hours of finishing have you got in the piece? I'm a convert to hard wax oil, cut between coats with 0000 and matted down if the sheen is too much the finish is superb. Three coats are easily adequate, four is some serious protection. Nice work, what's next?

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Probably more time finishing that making!  5/6 coats of Danish oil, denibbed (using the new Mirka Abranet abrasives - excellent product) and then polished with an old shirt.

I'm looking at Danish Oil for a bit of colour, and then a clear or very pale wax for the sheen, as you say.

Next? Some shelves/pull-out trays for my workshop, some shelves for my files, a TV stand thingy and some Adirondack chairs. Not much!

What are you doing at the moment?

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About time you retired isn't it Dick? It's a shame to let work get in the way of all those projects! Erm, up to lots of things, carving, making furniture, starting a kitchen this week (Shaker and I'm not copying) and have recently been climbing and felling quite alot, including some magnificent old Oaks...oh and travelling. Good to see you progressing.
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Ah. You spotted that!

I would have gone for a turned Shaker knob, but I had to match the other units. Or thought I did.

A real Shaker design would have an inset door, as well.

The door has since warped magnificently, and now doesn't touch the frame on the right. I'll need to think about that.

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It looks really good Dick and if the metal handle is to match with the rest of the kitchen then turned or other wooden handles would have looked out of place. I am sure that Shakers have moved with the times a certain amount and what the hell, it looks really good!

I for one don't think that you are going to have the chance to get bored when you do get your hard earned retirement. I think that you will have the absolutely stupid thought in your mind that you wonder how you ever had time to go to work. I do and I still wonder how I had the time for anything other than what I do now, sodall! ish?

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I have jus finished a little trinket box. About 5 inches long, made in yew, made on my band saw. Silly but quite nice, well I think so?

Makes a change for me that it's not turned.

[IMG]http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f180/Jonzjob/DSC07617.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f180/Jonzjob/DSC07618.jpg[/IMG]

I suppose it could be a box for the ladies to keep their lipstick in. Not here though, Frances don't use it!!

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I managed to get a lot of yew from a friend who had cut a lot in their big garden in Stroud. So I was really because I finished up with some lovely local wood, nice and dry too. I then proceeded to bring 3 LARGE cardboard boxes full of wooden blocks and the yew. The removal men didn't believe it!!

The finish is cellulose sanding sealer and then just de-knibbed. It will get some wax soon. Boxes in that style are really easy to make. All you need is a band saw..

[IMG]http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f180/Jonzjob/JoysMoneybox.jpg[/IMG]

This is also done on the band saw with a turned bung to get yer money out. A small birthday present for a friend, shame that her name is Christine? (not really, it's Joy) I don't like doing furniture too much because I am not  so good at the joining bit, but I admire people who are and that latest box of yours is lovely Dick!!

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No, but I was taught 'ow to 'old a 'ammer proper [:-))]

I do make all of the alphabet and had a comision to do a C & K, for Chris & Kyley for their wedding in Aussy. They either slid together or stood seperately and were apparently well liked by the couple. If I can find a photo I will post it

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My Uncle in Llanelly was quite well known for making Welsh Love Spoons.We have 3 personalised ones he did for us plus one for the P.O.Wales ceremony. Anyone else got any? I used to keep old bits of solid beech/walnut etc from my antiquing furniture days for him to carve. When he sent out Christmas cards he used to enclose a tiny heart spoon. I did find a roll of old carving chisels and gave him , he took great pleasure in using them. People used to send him pieces of wood from all over the world to carve commerative pieces. I coveted a walking stick he carved but not being a too-close relative it is pride of place in another family members house.

I'm afraid to say I didn't inherit his patient approach to wood,but I'm quite handy with a big Westwing [hammer,not motorbike] and nails.

Regards

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