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Occasional table in cherry


Postie

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Hi, thought I would share this little table with you. I made it as a commision last year for a friend. It is made of American Cherry with an inlay of Autralian jarra, finished with a hardwearing polyurathane varnish (protection against coffee & wine spills)

 

Cheers Postie

 

[IMG]http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z110/glentham/img028.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z110/glentham/tommia120.jpg[/IMG]

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That is beautiful table Postie your friend will surley be delighted. On a slightly different note where do you get your woods from? We can get all that basics but anything like what you have mentioned has been a bit elusive so far we are also looking for exotic burrs etc can you help?

XX

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Hi Lilly

Thank you for those kind words. The cherry used in this project comes from Lincolshire & the jarra I brought from Africa. I have however, bought rough sawn planks from various timber yards in La Vendee & they will probably have some burrs lying around. They are uasually quite happy for you to have a nosey about looking for what you want (no hangups about H & S here). I really haven't looked around for turning wood yet as the lathe is still packed & I am up to my eye-balls in renovating at the moment.

The jarra I used as inlay came from ex railway sleepers I bought in Botswana & I have used it for various bits including this bowl I made for the eldest's girlfriend.

[IMG]http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z110/glentham/P7140033-1.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z110/glentham/P7140038-1.jpg[/IMG]

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Hi Dick - cherry for firewood - brings a tear to the eye!!! We used a lot of sleeper wood on the mine I woked at, took advantage of our container going to the UK & brought as much as I could over with me. It has come in very useful over the years. As I said before, my machines are still packed & I haven't really had a chance to do much recently due to renovations on the house. Next big job is the staircase & balustrade which means I have to get the machines out of their boxes & into use soon.

Will post a few pics when the job is done.

Cheers Postie

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I like the table Postie. A nice simple designe that lets the wood talk.. I always admire good joinery. It isn't my strong point, I like to be less formal!!

I'll be willing to bet that you didn't have your lathe going full whack when you turned the bowl. I like that too. That wood is lovely.

Good luck with the stair turning. It's difficult enough to get one balustrade as you want it, but unless you have a copy lathe you have a job to get the rest the same.

One of the things I have made sveral of is staunton style chess sets and the most difficult bits are the pawns, just trying to get them at least near to each other. I don't have copy kit...

I do like the table, well done [:D] !!

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Cheers JJ,

Thanx for comments - wife says I'm too pedantic but I enjoy getting things as perfect as possible, I do the woodwork & she does the finishing, team work!

Yes you're right, the lathe speed was around 1800 to 2000rpm. I have a Jet lathe which has heavy cast iron legs so is pretty stable & doesn't jump around at all. I do have a copy attachment but have decided to make my balustrade from steel - http://www.lapeyre.fr/Lapeyre/pub.accueil.PreHomeController.do?pageToDisplay=/Lapeyre/b_produits/b34_escaliers/b34_escaliers.htm. I am going to make something similar to "Monceau" out of 8mm square section. Think the lines are nice clean & can't afford the 535 Euros a meter from Lapeyre (need about 15mtrs). The Lapeyre Monceau is laser cut from sheets of 6mm plate hence their price.

Keep us informed of your next projects.[:)]

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[quote user="postie"]

 I have a Jet lathe which has heavy cast iron legs so is pretty stable & doesn't jump around at all.

Keep us informed of your next projects.[:)]

[/quote]

My first wife was a bit like that?[6].  At the momentI am making a 2 teired cake type stand with the centre post screw threaded into the platters. New stuf for me so it's a nice chalange...

My lathe is a Record CL1 with a 36 inch bed. Nice kit, but it's on 3 X 2 wooden legs that I have cross braced and bolted to the floor so I don't have to chase it around any more. It did keep me fit though[:)]..

I'll post some photos when it's done!!

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Thanx to you all for your kind words. It was fortunate that we lived where we could get great timber for virtually nothing - wish I'd arranged a second container full of the fantastic African timber that was there for the taking - as they say, hind sight - 20/20 vision!!![:'(]
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I was unfortunate enough to have to spend 2 1/2 years in Singapore in the late 60s. This was serving Her Majisty in the R.A.F. Hell, but someone had to do it [B][:-))][8-|]...  There was a fantastic restaurant there called The Old Russia, wow what a place.

Much later when I was working for IBM I was on a course in London and I saw the same name. I and a couple of other guys went along for a meal one eve and low and behold it was the same people. They had got fed up with trying to get good staff out there and up sticks and set up again in London. Now the point of the story. They had got the packers in and insisted that all of the packing cases were to be of the best Malay teak and that they were to be screwed and not nailed together. he locals thought he was totally mad.

When he set up in London he had the cases carefully dismantled and had the floor of his new restaurant done in teak. It was fantastic.

When we arrived we were in all sorts of VERY casual wear, in amongst all sorts of very elagent evening wear, and when the owner learned that I had been to his restaurant in Singapore we were treated as royalty. There were a lot of bemused and very well dressed people who were wondering just who were these scruffs who were being treated so well. We had a meal to remember !!!

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On a slightly different note as I notice you have been spending time in Africa you might be familiar with this, a friend kindly gave us a chunk of Stink wood and tonight I have been turning a small piece and it is beautiful to turn and has taken a lovely finish, but I did this without wearing proper clothing and as OH is in Blighty this week he's not here to nag about H&S and it was an impulse  that I started this and couldn't be bothered to change consequently have got stink wood dust down my clevage and thats not nice and I think it is an irritant well it is irritating but I can't find any reference on the net whether it is an irritant or not officially, whilst not suggesting that you will be experianced with dust down the clevage problem do you know about stinkwood????
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Hi Lilly

Stinkwood takes it name from the unpleasant smell it gives off when felled. Never heard of any toxins or irritants from this wood - never heard of it in a cleavage either, for that mattter!!! Stinkwood, blackwood & yellowwood are rarewoods that mostly came from the Tsitsikamma Forest on the south east coast of South Africa. Stinkwood is extremely hard to propogate & is usually only propogated by birds dispersing the seed - hence it is the most expensive native wood in South Africa. You are very lucky to have been given a piece, I've never used it! Have used blackwood & yellowwood - will post a few pics of the bits I've made from them later. Tambootie is one African wood that I know is very toxic. The wood cannot be used to cook on in an open fire - gives you the sh1ts, the natives use the berries as a laxitive. When turning tambootie you have to wear a good mask or you'll be on the loo for a long time!!! But I can say it's beautiful wood to turn!! Very oily so it doesn't sand very well - but boy, does it shine! Will post a pic of this wood as well (when I find the box of photos). Please share your finished Stinkwood turning with us!

Postie

 

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[quote user="postie"]

Very oily so it doesn't sand very well - but boy, does it shine! Will post a pic of this wood as well (when I find the box of photos). Please share your finished Stinkwood turning with us!

Postie

 

[/quote]

I've just re-read your post.

[:-))][:-))] Sanding Postie!! You will have the turning prefectionist police on yer tail. You know that the finish should come from your gouge. I am shocked, but power sanding really gets rid of a lot of sins don't it [;-)][:D]

The wood  detest turning is iroko. My eyes get sore, hands itch and nose runs. I won't turn it, unless by mistake and I have done that too[8-)][:$]...

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Hi JJ

Not sanding on turned bits (sacre bleu!!!), sanding on other things I have made from Tambootie[:)]. We used to find old trees lying about on river banks or near koppies (granite outcrops) always very irregular! Very unusual to get big straight pieces of wood so you can only make small or very rustic things from the wood. It is very hard wood & has a beautiful, very dark colour. The pics I have of projects made from Tambootie are still packed somewhere (?) but I will try to dig them out & then post them for you to see! Never used Iroko but it's reputation precedes it! And yes, I think we have all resorted to a little sanding every now & then to get rid of the sins!![;-)] Another fantastically hard, dark African wood is Combretum Imberbe (leadwood), it sinks when put into water. Takes a lot of work to turn but is very rewarding. Think I have brought a piece from Botswana with me - will have to get round to turning it when the renovations done (if ever???)[Www]

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Lead wood/iron wood? Is it the same, or similar?? I was luck enough to be given 2 HUGE rough cut planks of what I originally thought was walnut, but it turned out to be iron wood. We now have a bench I made from it and a bowl for the guy who gave me the wood. I have to send it to him soon. He delivered it from near Banbury to Stroud, Glos. and would not take a penny, not even for fuel.

Very hard on any type of cutting tool, quite brittle edges, but what a finish it gives. Very dark.

I also have several bits of a very heavy wood that came from S Africe. They arrived on a Bristol Britannia http://www.xm496.com/. The bits were holding the batteries in place!!!!! I was an electrician on this and 22 other Brits. when I was stationed at Lyneham in the early 60s and the electrician for 4 years when it retired to Kemble [:(]!! I fixed the batteries properly and aquired the wood. I am still waiting for the inspiration to use it. It too is very heavy, but much lighter colour than the iron wood.

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I think it's the same wood. If you hit leadwood with an axe the wood sparks, it's that hard. I don't remember the wood being brittle but I only used it for turning while practising my tool sharpening skills. As you say, gives a most brilliant finish. I once had this very big, irregular piece in my Record, it flew out & hit me in the chest![:'(] Brought a tear to the eye I might add! Like you, I'm only a hobby woodworker (boilermaker by trade) but I get a huge amount of satisfaction out of creating beautiful things from wood. It is a very generous & forgiving medium to work in. Post a pic of this other wood you have - I might be able to identify it for you.

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  • 2 months later...

It has just dawned on me that I too can join the cherry wood table club. This is one I made earlier...

[IMG]http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f180/Jonzjob/Cherrytable.jpg[/IMG]

The top, is flat to my surprise, and legs came from the same bit of wood, the upright was a cherry branch I was given ages ago. Just as well that you can't see the leg/upright joints in this photo [:$]

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Thanx Chris - JJ your little table is great. Have been offline for a few weeks 'cause the ole puter had to have some major transplant surgery done. She's still not right so am borrowing a machine to tide me over. In the meantime I have sorted out the little workshop & have decided I need at least another 30m2 of floor space. [:'(]  [:'(]  Can't swing a cat in there let alone do anything constructive!  So there go any new machines for the moment, an extension is more important.
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