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wooden kitchen worktops?


Patf

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Seeking advice from you woodworkers on the advisability of using wood for kitchen worktops.

This is Eddie's idea, he thinks with a few coats of varnish they should be impermeable. And they would look nice.

I'm not so sure - I do a lot of cooking and baking and there are constant food-spills needing scrubbing and wiping down. So I don't think wood can be hygienic.

I've seen wooden worktops which were oiled, but the owner always seemed reluctant to use them.

Has anyone made them, and is it possible to really seal the wood?

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 We thought about wood but frankly I am not exactly that keen on house work and anything that requires maintenance when there are other just as good alternatives, isn't for me.

Another think that put me off was the liklihood of them marking if you put a too hot pan on them, then the finish would be compromised .....

They do look good though .....

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Pat, Gemonimo has wooden work tops which are magnificent. 

I think she said that they were very hard work, she sanded and rubbed them all down by hand and I believe she said she rubbed in linseed oil.  It took many layers but she is very pleased with them.

If she reads this post, I am sure she'll come here and describe the whole process to you.

Wood's nice, a sort of "kind and forgiving" material unlike, for example, an unyielding material (I daren't say granite or people with granite work tops might have a go at me!) on which you'd have to be so careful putting down your crockery and glasses.

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We've got oak worktops. We originally applied several (3 I think) coats of Luberon Danish Oil before first using. We regularly apply additional coats when we are at the house. It's probably had around 10 coats over the last couple of years. Very quick and easy to apply and seems to be keeping it looking good.

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Wooden worktops are self sterilising, no man made product does that.

Care, yes they need care, just because the tops are made of wood doesn't mean you shouldn't use a chopping board.

Anything other than granite will be dammaged by a hot pan.

Can you re-surface a post formed worktop? Wood If damaged, just sand off the top and re-apply the danish oil, ok that takes a bit of time best you don't have it if you are not keen.

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I have bought Beech worktops for 4 kitchens in the last couple of years now, Magnet was a better deal than Wickes and Leroy Merlin the best deal of all in France (€100 per 3m length). All were 40mm sq composite, and came with stain to enrich the colour, together with cans of oil to seal, amazing quantities of which are soaked in like blotting paper, 4 coats did the job. Results are terrific, lovely colour, natural look and feel, good resistance to all normal kitchen usage and comes back with just a wipe. Red wine has been spilt and not noticed until dry and cleaned off with just damp cloth. So after a couple of years use all looking perfect. My son's partner put a hot pan straight from the cooker onto one and immediately burnt a ring, but it sanded out with a little home dec sander and after staining and oiling all good again. So if you like the look, as I do, then it's all about a little preparation and having a trivet stand by the cooker, The cut-out from the sink made a windowsill and a couple of chopping boards. I think they are wonderful, more human and nicer to look at and touch than any of the plastic formica or marble alternatives.
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Anything other than granite will be dammaged by a hot pan.

 My old laminate survived 20+ years without damage - granted we wre

sensible with it but it certainly survived the odd hot pan or two

The reason we considered wood was because we could have had a Belfast

sink with it....which Mr RH thought would be nice, and is an advantage

if you like  Belfast sinks, but it would have altered the whole style

of the kitchen.
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We have oak worktops (Leroy's best). I gave them three coats of heat-resistant varnish from, I think, V33. After two years of use, there are marks from carelessly placed hot pans, but apart from that they still look good, though they do show signs of use (they're wood after all).

I guess in another 2-3 years, I'll have to sand them down and apply another coat or two of varnish - no big deal.

However, if you want worktops to look perfect and stay looking perfect, then I don't think wood isn't for you.

Good luck

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Sounds like a good idea then. I didn't realise you could buy lengths of it, just ready to sand and oil. I thought it meant going to the woodyard and getting pieces cut etc.

At the moment we have large tiles, and food etc collects in the joins. I have to use a large board for kneading bread. So a slab of wood for a bench would be more practical.

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We too have wooden worktops... and young children...and  the two are very compatible :)  I sanded and oiled to start and have given them an oil at regular intervals but it's easy enough to do.  I did have a mark on one which I sanded out and re-oiled.  Mine withstand heat pretty well but I do use chopping boards still.  Really happy with how they look and how easy they are to look after... we got our from Leroy Merlin and were really cheap... 3 years ago :)
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I had some of this shipped out a little while back. http://www.chestnutproducts.co.uk/results.php?cat=Oils . I don't use it for worktops, just on my turning items, but as it says on the tin it's ideal for floors and kitchens. Could well be what's needed for a nice looking, hard waring kitchen top!

It gives a lovely finish. I got it from here http://www.turnersworkshop.co.uk/woodturnersupplies.html#Chestnut_Finishes . I phoned Richard and he was very helpfull.

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