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railway sleepers


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R/H, I beg to differ.  Railway sleepers are not creosoted - they get like that after years of brake-block dust and diesel from the trains which run over them.  This of course may be equally problematical for gardeners - I don't know. They are often made of Jarrah - an Australian timber which is extremely hard wood - just try sawing one in half!!

Pole Vert is a sort of agricultural merchants franchise. They are all over the place around here (rather like Gamm Vert).  If you have one, they will be in the phone book.  Or maybe try Googling?

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You can of course order them here: www.1000traverses.com/produits.htm

As a railwayman I am aware that many sleepers are also impregnated with other products. Fortunately most modern trains (eg modern TGVs) now have chemical toilets. Many but not all sleepers (dependent on the type of wood) were treated with creosote years ago.

Brian

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[quote user="Brian"]You can of course order them here: www.1000traverses.com/produits.htm
As a railwayman I am aware that many sleepers are also impregnated with other products.

Brian
[/quote]

Really Brian?  I always thought the 'other products' were recycled into the Strongbow cans chilling in the buffet car? 

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[quote user="Brian"]You can of course order them here: www.1000traverses.com/produits.htm
As a railwayman I am aware that many sleepers are also impregnated with other products. Fortunately most modern trains (eg modern TGVs) now have chemical toilets. Many but not all sleepers (dependent on the type of wood) were treated with creosote years ago.

Brian
[/quote]

 

And if they are genuine French railway sleepers they will have had the annual dousing from the weed-killing train.  For garden use - avoid.

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I have used them as gate posts in the past and have never noticed an asbsence of plant life around them!  I guess it just depends what you are using them for and where they are situated in relation to sensitive planting.  Nothing sensitive has ever survived my lack of gardening skills though - sleepers or not![:D]
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 I think it depends what the OP wants to use them for, if they have a notion of a sleeper edging with plants tumbling over, or constructing  a raised bed then personally I would look for landscape sleepers, if its for something less,(in a planting sense) like Cooperlolas gate posts, then fine.

There is a difference in cost between landscape timpers and railway sleepers but its not huge.

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RH, I've  never heard of a landscape sleeper before - is it just a copy of a railway sleeper for landscape gardening?  All the treatment a pucca railway sleeper gets means it should last a life time, and of course they are made of very expensive hardwood, money no object.  Maybe landscape sleepers, just have a pressure treatment and a 10 year life span??

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Last year I wanted raised beds and looked into this. On a visit to the Spring show in Malvern we saw something we liked and the guy who was the designer told us what to look and ask for. They probably are tannelised, but we lined them inside, sides with polythene and can treat the outside with what we want - for now we have left them. I like gardening and sometimes pay a reasonable amount for a different or special variety, I don't want any risk of it dieing through something I could prevent

[IMG]http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y194/russethouse/Patio16.jpg[/IMG]

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We have had Railway sleepers from our local Point Vert/ Agrial. Traverses de chemin fer are readily available, prices ranging from 10€ to 17€ depending on quality- depends on what they are being used for. Hubby is a landscape gardener and uses them a lot in the gardens he creates. Plants have never died as a result of coming into contact with the railway sleepers- however I don't think the same should be said if using them near to edible produce. [+o(]

[:D]

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