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Shrub for pot


Gardengirl

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Any suggestions for a fairly tall-growing shrub we can put in a pot to provide cover between our patio and next door? One spot is overlooked. Our area is very hot in summer and cold in winter. In summer it would only get water from our next door neighbour as and when she thinks about it.

I thought of a laurier rose, but as far as I can tell, they should be cut back quite a lot fairly regularly.

Thanks, Jo
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 I've suggested bamboo recently on here, if I suggested it again people may get the idea I'm a bamboo 'freak' [:)]

Having said that tomorrow we take delivery of a new bamboo, bright yelow/gold stems with green ridges ( from The Big Plant nursery at the Twford /Wargrave roundabout.)

If its like the other yellow stemmed one we have it will be nice and bushy at the top where as the black bamboo is thicker at the bottom and more airy at the top

Actually there are some very delicate varieties of eucalyptus around, but even gunni would be thick if stooled

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[quote user="gardengirl "]Any suggestions for a fairly tall-growing shrub we can put in a pot to provide cover between our patio and next door? One spot is overlooked. Our area is very hot in summer and cold in winter. In summer it would only get water from our next door neighbour as and when she thinks about it.

I thought of a laurier rose, but as far as I can tell, they should be cut back quite a lot fairly regularly.

Thanks, Jo[/quote]

Don't forget that the " laurier rose" is poisonous..I have warned a couple of people with young children about this when I see a pot in their courtyard..

"Le laurier rose est une des plantes les plus dangereuses dont toutes les parties sont toxiques (présence d'hétérosides

cardiotoniques). L'ingestion d'une simple feuille peut s'avérer

mortelle pour un adulte, en raison des troubles cardiaques souvent

provoqués. Les circonstances d'intoxications sont le plus souvent des

accidents chez l'enfant. Il a même été utilisé à des fins suicidaires

et abortives"

(from Wikipédia)

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Thanks for that warning, Norman; I didn't know that. There are no children around, but it's best to be aware.

The new bamboo sounds lovely, Russethouse. I might well check out the Twyford nursery. We would want something that doesn't get too top-heavy, as the winds can be strong in our part of the Gard.

Jo
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[quote user="Pierre ZFP"][quote user="Russethouse"]

  but even gunni would be thick if stooled

[/quote]

What on earth does this mean ????[:'(]

It sounds like gardening advice from 'Rambling Syd Rumpo'   (Remember him from Round the Horne)

[/quote]

Sorry, I missed an 'i' : Eucalyptus gunnii [:(]

See :http://www.longacres.co.uk/epages/longacres.storefront/EN/Product/EUCAGUNN?kw=eucalyptus%20gunnii&fl=227561&ci=1351836631&network=s&gclid=CNifqYC1r5wCFWIB4wodCWYdlQ

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Ah right...... and 'stooling' ? (or is it something I'd rather not know ? [+o(]  )

Fig trees great in pots but they drop their leaves in autumn of course.

Eucalyptus not good near swimming pools.  Or at least not for me as the leaves made the water go yuk in my (now defunct) little above ground pool.

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Thanks for the replies. I'm thinking a eucalyptus might be good. I started thinking about a bamboo after a recent visit to the Bambouseraie, Suzy - had a wonderful day out there, using the steam train. I also love the idea of a fig tree, hadn't thought of that either; we have very few neighbours from September to May/June, so the lack of leaves wouldn't matter quite so much. And if my neighbour didn't remember to water it much (or manage to hit the pot with water over the wall), they seem very cheap there; so a replacement wouldn't break the bank.

Thanks again, Jo
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  • 1 month later...

Hi gardengirl,

I wondered if you'd got anything yet for your pot.  Having passed the bambouseraie for years (both in the car and on the train) and never visited it, I made a not of your 'wonderful day out' and we visited this year at the end of August.  Wow, what a wonderful place !  I loved the Dragon Garden and like you I am now looking for places to grow bamboo !!  Unfortunately we also had to make our annual visit to the Poterie at La Madeleine, where I ogle the pots and then keep my purse firmly in my pocket.  Should have bought one years ago when the exchange rate was OK !  Now a nice bamboo in one of those pots would be fab.  Oh well, I can dream !

Sue

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Glad you enjoyed the visit, Suzy. We revisited it on Tuesday, with our son and his partner.My husband stayed on the train and spent the afternoon in Anduze; he's not very in to such things, although he enjoyed his one visit. We met up again on the 5pm train back.

I enjoyed it more than in July, as it was much too hot then. The temp was around 24° on Tues, so a lot more comfortable for strolling round.

I also love the Dragon Garden; my son's partner loved the maze, too. On our July visit we went with the guided tour, but relied on the English commentaries this time as the two younger ones don't have much French.

While we were there, one of the bamboo experts recommended me not to buy a bamboo for our terrace; he said it would die on a south-facing site without great amounts of water in summer. So as they can be rather expensive, I've given that idea up. At the moment, I'm veering between an olive tree and a laurier rose. I love the idea of my own olives, but know that laurier roses are as tough as old boots!

I'm now saving the bamboo idea for our UK garden, along with a eucalyptus. Thanks for the suggestion of a good place to look, Russethouse.

Jo
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I have about 20 bamboo's at the moment planted in our garden here in france. We have had them in pots in the uk and we are talking big pots here 2ft 6" across by 3ft high double handled ones. They are ok in pots only if you can guarantee that they will be watered evry other day in the summer and even watered in the winter from time to time. They suck up a lot of water and you can never keep them happy unless as i said watered very often.

They are never as happy in a pot as in the ground, I would say maybe 2 or 3 years tops and then they need to be either taken out and split or put in the ground. If you split then you can have 2 in pots and on you go. I would always plant mine in pots in the uk as the garden we had was pretty much hard standing and the best potting medium is John Inees no.3 they love it. Plenty of high nitrogen feed from spring to mid summer should see a plant do very well.

The one that is probably most tolerant of going without water for the longest is Pseudosasa Japonica (Arrow bamboo) Very straight canes growing very crowded and big long dark green leaves. Can grow to about 18ft and will run all over the place if not put in a pot or in the ground with a good root barrier around it. Very hardy also as most are.

If you need to know anything else about bamboos you can PM me and I will try to help.[:)] 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Does this plant really have to go in a pot? Is there no chance of getting it in the soil: that's always the best.

Anyway, apart from Bamboo (which is great as you can by tall ones immediately.....although it may split the pot in a couple of years) consider evergreen Magnolia grandiflora, Laurus nobilis (Bay), Lonicera lucida (a nice form of Privet) and Photinia fraseri Red Robin.
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