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Which chainsaw


PaulT

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Firstly, there is an older thread that ended up in some rather nasty posts because safety was brought up - please do not let this thread go that way. I am aware of the safety implications.

Need to buy a petrol chainsaw. Got a few trees of small diameter to take down and also need something to cut branches for firewood. Therefore, the use will not be very great.

Looked a various reviews:

On the UK B&Q website the McCullochs got very bad reviews mostly citing difficulty in starting.

We have a Ryobi strimmer and find that is extremely difficult to start so wish to give them a wide berth.

Was thinking of a Stihl MS181 C-BE

Looking in other places Husqvana (sp?) seemed to do quite well.

In one old thread on here Gluestick posted that he had bought a Mitox which was based on a a redundant model from another maker (elsewhere on the net one assumption was Stihl).

I do not want to pay more than I need to especially as it will only have occassional use but by the same token I do not want to pay very little and get something that is a problem.

I would therefore appreciate your recommendations.

Paul

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Remember nothing sucks like an Electrolux!

Electrolux own Husqvana, McCullochs, Jonsered, Poulan, Flymo etc.

Ryobi is part of TTI along with Homelite, AEG, Milwaukee, Hoover, Dirt Devil and is also probably part or was part of the above.

Stihl is independent.

Poor starting is more likely down to poor maintenance and set up.  I have a Ryobi that was a bad starter, My inlaws have a Ryobi which is an excellent starter. My Stihl starts on the 5th pull.  Ryobi seem to have clever but delicate carburetors ok when they work but a pain when they pack in. In an emergency I bought one from Aldi which serves well as a backup and is an ok starter and with it's little pico chain cuts quite fast even compared to my full size Stihl.  I have just bought a Bosch electric chainsaw as plugging in is very quick! and for cutting extra firewood in the evening without waking the entire valley it's great.

 

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Thanks for the reply.

The Ryobi is not a case of poor maintenance, it is fairly new and started OK the first couple of uses and then had problems starting. I will strip it down when we are next in France but I normally only give a manufacturer one chance.

Paul

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My first chainsaw was a McCulloch and tbh it was fine.

Starting wasn't a problem. I did have to play around with the oilways as I had a problem with the chain not getting lubricated properly but nothing major. I've now got s Stihl which is very nice to use.
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[quote user="PaulT"]

Thanks for the reply.

The Ryobi is not a case of poor maintenance, it is fairly new and started OK the first couple of uses and then had problems starting. I will strip it down when we are next in France but I normally only give a manufacturer one chance.

Paul

[/quote]

Yes I know what you mean, see how you get on, I have stripped mine cleaned blown out all the little ports etc but made no difference. They make millions of them but it's one make I wouldn't by again. 

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I had problems with a stihl, the one everyone advised 'must have', UK main agent service didn't cure the starting and running problem and by that time I was en France, so the local guy checked it over, pointed out a few things the main service had not done and returned it 'fine'; unfortunately it wasn't, exactly the same and I needed it so returned it to the local guy who tried again, this time a miniscule perforation was found in the diaphragm and replaced. Subsequently started and ran fine, in reality these things have a cause and can ultimately be rectified when recognised. Incidentally the local guy used a 'Go', not necessarily the best. but as he put it, cheap enough to buy two.
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I have persevered with my now 7-year-old Ryobi, and cut down some hefty trees with it, but there were times when I could have dumped it at the dechetterie.

Starting has not been a problem. Just have to make sure the air filter is clear.

What was a disaster was the design/build of the chain brake mechanism. After a few uses, the brake started to engage when set in the off position, slowing the engine. There is no adjustment for this so, without the luxury of time to send it back to the supplier, I decided to modify it myself. This took a few attempts to get the balance right between having a free-running engine and an effective chain brake.

No problems for the past year or so and it has had a lot of use. Obviously, mucking about with something as important as the chain brake is not something which is recommended; so others experiencing similar problems shouldn't try this unless confident that they can do it safely and are willing to accept the risk.

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I bought a McCulloch 8 years ago and it's still running well. I had some tickover problems but a friend saw that I had incorrectly mixed the 2-stroke fuel (I had marked the mixing can incorrectly, stupid boy), and that cured it. 

The important thing with any of them is to keep the chain sharp.

The recommendation for Stihl is still (ha ha) valid; these are generally recognised as the better quality product, but it's all a matter of affordability for me, weighed against how much use, and what sort of use (cutting down trees as opposed to just cutting up firewood say) it is going to get.

Teapot made a very valid comment about cutting wood with an electric chainsaw to avoid disturbing the neighbours!

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[quote user="sid"]

Teapot made a very valid comment about cutting wood with an electric chainsaw to avoid disturbing the neighbours!

[/quote]

Thanks for the replies - seems a little luck of the draw - think I will put a piece of paper with each having a manufacturer name on it in to a hat and pulling one out.

Electric could be the way to go except I have some trees to take down and I have not got long enough extension leads [:)]

Paul

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[quote user="Théière"]There is Cordless Paul. some pretty big saws now.[/quote]

Thanks for that and have had a look. However, only small bars on them unless you are paying megabucks. Otherwise would have been ideal.

Did see an ad on eBay for a chainsaw that was for spares or repair. Someone have sent this question:

Is the chainsaw that is for spares or repair complete?

Then answer:

Yes, it is complete but no chain or bar

Beam me up Scotty

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Remember nothing sucks like an Electrolux!

Electrolux own Husqvana, McCullochs, Jonsered, Poulan, Flymo etc.

 

Having started out with a McCulloch - which was passable we made lots of enquiries with farming/forester friends and they all agree that Stihl is the best (and most expensive) but that Husqvarna is the next best. We currently have two of these  Husqvarna chainsaws and love them to bits - they are great items and the only problem we had was with the second one that my husband mixed the fuel incorrectly on initial start up. We bought ours from a firm in Devon and their prices are really competitive. Cannot remember name but could look up if you would like it.

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Buyer Beware!!!!

Anyone considering the purchase of a Husky or Stihl chainsaw via a well known on-line auction site, be warned.!!!!!

There have very recently been two models which have sold for a lot of money, both of which were not the genuine thing.

The auction site were notified of these models being offered for sale, but decided to do nothing about it and let the bidding continue.

One model in particular to watch out for is the Husqvarna 395XP.

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  • 2 weeks later...
My 1st Sthil lasted me about 20 years or so before the piston burnt out. Probably my fault with the mix, I'm not sure? Now I have a Sthil 181 and find it really easy to use and reliable. The 'easy start' is a real boon. No heaving yer heart out to start. Just pull the cord, wind up the start kick spring and when you get near the end of the cord it kicks over and starts..

I also have a B&D Aligator for pruning work. It makes short work of anything up to 4" thick and becasue the chain is totally enclosed you don't need any safety gear other than eye protection. Along with that I have their 'saw on a stick', both cordless. That also cuts up to 4" branches and with the extension allows me to cut branches  about  meters high with my feet on the ground. No good if you are doing loads of cutting, but ideal for what I have to do.

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Many thanks for all your views.

I decided that I would buy a Stihl MS181 C-BE as per Jonzjob and intended on buying it on the way back from a shopping centre that Yve wanted to go to. However, she popped in to M&S and bought some frozen items so there was not time to stop and buy the chainsaw. Thaqt evening I was browsing eBay and fairly close by was a used Homelite and a very cheap price. It came with 2 used chains as well and this started me thinking. I only require it to finish taking some trees down - the others I had taken down using a bow saw but the last ones really needed the chainsaw. Then the only use would be to cut wood to go on the fire and ideally an electric saw would be easier. So I bought the one off of eBay which starts very easily. I will use it then put it back on to eBay and then buy the electric one.

The Stihl did appeal but at the end of the day felt I could not really justify it even with the local dealer giving a 20% discount, i.e. £240 instead of £300.

Paul

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As an adjunct I have a bosch 550w plane, and a De walt 650w hammer drill, both cost me deep in the purse, for what they are, the De Walt was nearly £100 after discount. A Carpenter who has been working with me was using obviously more powerful and sturdy versions, in fact both plane and hammer drill were 1000w 'Parkside' and I asked him where he got his tools, 'Parkside' are Lidl he said '£29.95 each, brilliant, always last longer than the guarantee';
you don't always get what you pay for. . .
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