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how long is a piece of string?


mark crompton

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I hope someone can answer this question in an approximate way, without

repeating the title.

I'm looking at a B&B with a gite in Haute

Normandie and it has a couple barns in good condition.

If I was

thinking about converting each to gites, both two bed on two floors,

both about 100m2, what would be the extremely rough cost, and the very

rough timescale, hopefully something more specific than, say, between a

hard-boiled egg  and peat turning into coal.

Hopefully

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A new build in rural 79 will probably run around € 1000/M2 for an existing fabric in good nick, say around € 500/M2. But it depends what you put in it...a jacuzzi-shower complex with LED mood lighting modulating in unison with your Ogg-Vorbis audio clips will come a tad more expensive.[:D]
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[quote user="pachapapa"]A new build in rural 79 will probably run around € 1000/M2 for an existing fabric in good nick, say around € 500/M2. But it depends what you put in it...a jacuzzi-shower complex with LED mood lighting modulating in unison with your Ogg-Vorbis audio clips will come a tad more expensive.[:D][/quote]

I'd agree - but I'd budget more like 1100 to be sure I'd covered everything without posh finishes. I note you haven't said if/how you wish to heat the properties for the winter or air-con for the summer so the string is still rolled up and can't really be measured....

The other costs to bear in mind are the possible need for extra foul drainage capacity, painting/decorating & finishing (which are not generally incl within the build figure) and external landscaping: which you need to get in pretty quickly if you want to let successfully.

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I haven't been posting on here for a while, have lost my login details and so have started all over again.

We have had a house with a 2 storey 100m2 barn close-by for a good few years now and more than once I've done the number crunching to see if converting it to habitable accommodation for renting out would be worth it. I don't have the numbers to hand just now, but I worked out refurb costs, loss of interest on savings so spent (even worse if you are borrowing the funds) compared with say 20 - 25 weeks per year rental income added to the the cost of generating that income: advertising, wear and tear, fuel bills and so on.

The bottom line was that I just couldn't get any meaningful return even over a long period and maybe all I had left was perhaps a chance of capital appreciation at the end of it.

Five years on and the barn still has only a new roof (to prevent deterioration of the fabric) and I am sorry to say that it's going to stay that way.

In my humble opinion the only way to make rental gite work is to start with a building in good order.
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[quote user="Nearly Retired"]In my humble opinion the only way to make rental gite work is to start with a building in good order.[/quote]There are any number of such ready to go properties for sale in all popular areas so IMO better to buy someone elses distress sale than throw all your own money at developing one, harsh I know but it's the way of the world.

Unless very special I think you'd have to go some to realise 20-25 weeks rental though.

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[quote user="mark crompton"]I hope someone can answer this question in an approximate way, without

repeating the title.

I'm looking at a B&B with a gite in Haute

Normandie and it has a couple barns in good condition.

If I was

thinking about converting each to gites, both two bed on two floors,

both about 100m2, what would be the extremely rough cost, and the very

rough timescale, hopefully something more specific than, say, between a

hard-boiled egg  and peat turning into coal.

Hopefully

[/quote]

Been there, done it , therefore my answer is;

Unsustainable

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