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Glorified Paddling Pool


Fi

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Can some kind person answer this question for me.

We want to get one of those semi-permanent glorified paddling pools for the brats (no money for a real pool at the moment[:(]).  We also have two gites who have the use of our grounds and so our guests would be able to access the pool.  Would we need to fence it/secure it in any way (if we do, we won't bother - too much expense/hassle!)  We would put the cover on it when not being used, but that wouldn't stop a determined flea from getting wet, let alone a  5 year old on a mission!

Any thoughts???

Thanks

Fi

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Hi Fi, (sounds like some sort of quality audio)

Back to the point, if the sides of the pool are higher than 1.1m and you remove the ladder you should be ok providing the brats can't climb on anything closer than 1m away to gain access.

 

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[quote user="ErnieY"]Glorified paddling pool or whatever if it is being used by paying guests would it not fall under the same rules and regulations as a proper pool, as per THIS thread ?

[/quote]

Perhaps the use of "whatever" is key here.  I am talking about an inflatable, around thigh height, paddling pool.  They cost about 100 euros in a grand surface.  Round, hold their shape with the weight of water (and an inflatable rim).   Yes with filter and possibly steps, and a cover, but by no means in the same class as a "proper" swimming pool as discussed in that thread. 

By the same token then, a noddy baby's paddling pool would also come under these rules if it happened to be in the garden of  a gite?

Now I am confused.  I am all for safety and security, but this does seem to be taking H&S to it's scary extreme (cutting down horse chestnuts because of conker injuries springs to mind[:D])

I do so hope you are wrong, or I will have some very disappointed children!

Fi

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If you take a few minutes to read the thread Ernie has linked to, you will see it's about the quality of the bathing water, not about the risk of injury.

Unless your swing and trampoline are under water...[:-))]

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[quote user="Clair"]If you take a few minutes to read the thread Ernie has linked to, you will see it's about the quality of the bathing water, not about the risk of injury.

Unless your swing and trampoline are under water...[:-))]

[/quote]

I did take the time to read the thread, but still couldn't link the information to an inflatable paddling pool as opposed to the full sized swimming pool under discussion.  And, my initial post was about security, not water quality, hence my comment about the play equipment!

(edit:  the issue of water quality hadn't even entered my mind.  All I want to do is keep my brats entertained over the summer holidays, whilst not endangering life and limb of my PG's!)

(edit again - sorry! if we get one, we'll have it in our side of the terrain where they have no business being anyway, and tell them that due to rules and regs they can't use it - will also have (multilingual) signage to that effect too.  It's a knee height paddling pool for goodness sake, using cruise missiles to crack walnuts springs to mind) 

And yes, I know none of of the posters write the rules, so I am not having a go, but it still seems OTT to me!)

Fi

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Fi, if you have your family and a family from the gite sharing the pool and the little darlilgs on holiday pee lots in the pool because they don't know or care then you will finish up with a wonderful breeding ground for all sorts of nasties! On top of that if one of the little darlings then goes on to have an accident?????

Your conclusion is the best. Put it over to the side out of the way and out of bounds.[:D]

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[quote user="Jonzjob"]

Fi, if you have your family and a family from the gite sharing the pool and the little darlilgs on holiday pee lots in the pool because they don't know or care then you will finish up with a wonderful breeding ground for all sorts of nasties! On top of that if one of the little darlings then goes on to have an accident?????

Your conclusion is the best. Put it over to the side out of the way and out of bounds.[:D]

[/quote]

You are not wrong!  I just don't like being a meany to small children (even though it can be fun if you're in the mood [;-)]).  Still, I could always lend them a plaster mixing bac as a wet play tank..[:D]

Fi

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[quote user="Fi"][quote user="Clair"]
[/quote]

 And, my initial post was about security, not water quality, hence my comment about the play equipment!

 It's a knee height paddling pool for goodness sake, using cruise missiles to crack walnuts springs to mind) 

And yes, I know none of of the posters write the rules, so I am not having a go, but it still seems OTT to me!)

Fi

[/quote]

Fi.

I am the last person on earth to lecture on security or H&S but it is a sad fact that many unsupervised toddlers have drowned even in the ankle high paddling pools that they had in my day.

Couple that with the habits of a lot of modern parents that do not occupy themselves with their offspring, the kind of "its your pool, your responsibility" attitude and the prevelant someone must be to blame (except of course the parents) compensation culture, and I think that  you have made the right decision, - regrettably.

As for the play equipment, if one of these offspring had an accident using it I am sure that the suddenly concerned parents would hold you to blame but perhaps there is not the same legal framework in France as there is for pools.

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It probably has little or no legal standing, but I will put up a notice on the info board in each gite saying that the play equipment is used at own risk.  (I remember staying in one gite where I had to sign to say I accepted this stipulation - but she was the dragon landlady from Bognor, reincarnated in the Vosges!). 

I can't take down the play equipment even if I wanted to - it's concreted in!

I will get the pool (on sale in Cora for a mere 45 euros at the moment), but we'll just have to be strict and grumpy!  Fortunately only a couple of families with miniatures have booked so far - mainly oldies,  who, if they are daft enough to get into trouble in a kids paddling pool, frankly deserve everything they get!

Fi

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[quote user="Fi"][quote user="Jonzjob"]

Fi, if you have your family and a family from the gite sharing the pool and the little darlilgs on holiday pee lots in the pool because they don't know or care then you will finish up with a wonderful breeding ground for all sorts of nasties! On top of that if one of the little darlings then goes on to have an accident?????

Your conclusion is the best. Put it over to the side out of the way and out of bounds.[:D]

[/quote]
You are not wrong!  I just don't like being a meany to small children (even though it can be fun if you're in the mood [;-)]).  Still, I could always lend them a plaster mixing bac as a wet play tank..[:D]

Fi

[/quote]

Oh dear, the dreaded plaster mixing bac! Make sure it's got the required fence, 1.1 meters high at least 1 meter from the bac with nothing withiin the 1.1 meter boundry won't you.

Or maybe the floating security cover would be a better bet. [geek]

Or even better, just fill it with the quick drying plaster the French use. Do that just after they have got in and then they won't be any problem! [6]

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