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Hi

Good news for 'inactifs' already resident in France. As we are considering a new life in France  (for the second time) we were wondering if anyone would know of our chances of getting into the system with  5+ years residency which took place ten years ago.  A long shot, we know, but thought it might be worth a try.  Anyone any ideas?

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Sorry, no. You have to have 5 years of uninterrupted & legal residence in France to qualify as a permanent resident. If you follow the link below it will take you to the French Gov. site detailing the Droits de Sejour.

http://vosdroits.service-public.fr/particuliers/N13510.xhtml?&n=Europe&l=N9&n=Citoyens%20europ%C3%A9ens%20en%20France&l=N123

 

Hope this helps

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Thanks for that. I've read the link and, as you say, residence needs to be continuous.  Oh well. worth a try.

So my next question is - if we do gites and are probably paying into all the relevant departments, can we then join CPAM or is there a minimum income which needs to be earned?

 

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If you register your gites as a proper business, then you pay cotisations and join the Regime Generale (CPAM is just the administration arm of the stystem) for healthcare.

If, when you lived in France for five years, you worked here and have any resulting French pension contributions, you can apply to join the CMU (the section of the health system which the early-retired join - if they are entitled to do so) on that basis when you reach 60.  If you can produce the proof, you may be OK.

If you are entitled to an E106, this can last for up to 30 months, so that just leaves you a "health gap" of an additional 30 months (with me so far?) in which to pay for private care, before you qualify under the five year rule.  However, this is dependent upon your legally paying all your taxes here, and having a private policy which covers all your healthcare needs - including doctors, medicines etc - not just hospitalisation etc.

Once you reach UK state retirement age, you can apply for an E121, which may be sooner than the five years.  If a married couple, then you can normally both benefit from cover paid by the UK, once the first of you qualifies for this.

Some alternatives to contemplate, anyway.

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Many thanks again. We did, indeed, both work in France and pay contributions so will definitely bear that in mind when we eventually sell our house her and get over to France.  Thought I'd never want to face French bureaucracy again - bring it on! But we know it will be worth it in the end. Anyone else in our position - don't give up....
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For gites you join the RSI - Régime Social des Indépendants and you get your health cover through a separate organisation chosen from the liste des organismes conventionées, not the CPAM. (At least that is how it is for us here in Normandy- others will be able to confirm if this is the case elsewhere).

regards

Lisa

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[quote user="LisaJ"]

For gites you join the RSI - Régime Social des Indépendants and you get your health cover through a separate organisation chosen from the liste des organismes conventionées, not the CPAM. (At least that is how it is for us here in Normandy- others will be able to confirm if this is the case elsewhere).

regards

Lisa

[/quote]Yes, Lisa, sorry.  I'm told by other gite owners that in their area, the section for healthcare is called RAMS - so it obviously varies a bit - but the principal remains the same but it's not the Regime Generale, as I stated incorrectly above.
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