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E106 - Does it cover my husband?


Hev&Jon

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That's an interesting question. He will not be covered by your E106, as they were issued separately, to the two individuals.

But as a non-working spouse he could well be included under your French social security number and thus continue to receive health benefits in France.

I have no direct personal experience of this situation - maybe somebody else does?

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When we moved to France I was not eligible for the E106 and just a month short of retirement age, when I contacted Newcastle they explained that I could be covered on my husbands E106 until my E121 kicked in and when my husbands E106 runs out he can be covered by my E121.  Suggest you contact Newcastle, I found them to be so helpful.

Hope this helps

Sylvia

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Unusual situation Heather.  What Sylvia says is true about piggy backing on your O/Hs 106, but you have to get CPAM to agree and process this and you will need the appropriate letters from the UK.  ie cancellation of your O/H's E106 entitlement and conjoining onto your's.

It is also possible that your O/H's expiry is wrong as it would appear he had less recent NI entitlement than you and only got his E106 for a year, was this the case?  Get on to Newcastle first,  you need them to confirm your joint E 106 status and if necessary issue a letter cancelling your O/H's 106 by a letter to CPAM.  Then go to CPAM and ask for your O/H to be added to your account as a conjoint and ask for a carte vitale for him as well.  Although its the same account, its best if you have your own cartes in case one has need of it if the other is not with them.  If you go to Villefranche de Rge, they have no problem with issuing two cards. ( if you are the Heather from 12 that is!!)

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I piggy-backed onto my OH's E 106 after mine ran our (a year before his) but there was a box which was ticked on it (my husband's) which said something to the effect that it covered other members of his family, living in the same home. You might take a closer look at your E106 and see if you can spot this.  If it's there then it is, as said above, just a simple matter of getting your husband's cancellation letter out of Newcastle and your local CPAM should be happy to fix the rest.
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You cannot assume that you can piggyback either partner on an E121.

The DWP website covering state pensions whilst living abroad, mentions the following condition for applying for the issue of an E106/E121:

"you may also get healthcare cover from the UK for yourself and for any members of your family who depend on you and who live with you." (my emphasis)

That suggests that if the younger partner is the breadwinner, then they are not a dependent, so they won't qualify for one. Furthermore, your CPAM may not allow piggybacking - I know of one such case where the individual concerned has a company pension and his CPAM has refused to include him on his non-earning wife's newly issued E121.  Furthermore, his personal future contributions are based on his RFR - which takes into account his whole family income, without making any allowance for his wife's free cover.

In my own case, I qualified for an E106 but the wife didn't. CPAM accepted her on the back of my form (correctly as it happens), but did not ask any questions about whether or not she was dependent on me or vice versa.  If you are an existing CMU subscriber looking to obtain your future healthcover free under your wife's E121, then they'd be aware of your situation and may well refuse.


 

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Hello SD,

As long as one of the partners is entitled to E106 or E121 then cover for the other can be put in place provided they organize their affairs correctly from the outset But if you start off wrong then it can be difficult to retrieve the situation ie; the result being up to your a*** in alligators when the original idea was to drain the swamp. So the example you quote of a couple, one of whom is paying contributions, simply indicates they ignored the dangers of the swamp; possibly by seeking advice from those who frequent expat bars.

Regards

Owen

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On the contrary, they have followed the rules to the letter. 

They applied for their E106s in accordance with DWP procedures, then submitted them to their CPAM in accordance with French regulations.  As a result, they received the free healthcare they were entitled to, up until those arrangements expired.  They then submitted applications for CMU and were assessed by their CPAM and told they would have to pay future contributions based upon the official percentage of their revenu fiscale de reference. This has been the situation for the past few years.

The older wife has now received her E121 and as a result, they applied to their CPAM to have their situation reviewed.  CPAM confirmed that the wife would now receive free cover and they have updated her carte vitale to reflect her new situation.  However, they have advised him that as he is not a dependant of his wife, he is not entitled to be included on her E121 and must continue to pay contributions in his own right.

So, the DWP say that if you are under retirement age, you can only have an E121 if you are a dependant of your older wife.  The CPAM say that if you are under retirement age, then you can only be included on your wife's E121 if you are a dependant.

Where does the expat bar come into this?

 

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I hope that this isn't going off at too much of a tangent.... When we move this year we'll be covered by my husband's E121 as he's over 65 and , I suppose, I would be seen as his dependent. Does anyone know what would happen to my health cover if (heaven forbid!) he were to die before I reach 60? I could get an E106 to cover me for the first two years but there'd still be a gap of two years that could be left uncovered. Sorry to be morbid but....
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Hello SD,

Well I am pleased that they did not act simply on bar room chat and in my first post I did say "possibly" because enough people do take this route. It is difficult for me to comment further as I do no know the full circumstances. What I would say that whilst following DWP and CPAM procedures is admirable it does help if you are armed with background knowledge and not just snippets from websites. As I say it is probably too late now but you may wish to suggest to this couple that they take along the E121 and ask CPAM if they will submit E107 (nominating the husband as dependant) to the DWP . It is possible that this particular CPAM office may not have even heard of E107. I have successfully used this device several times.

CPAM gains also as, although no contributions via CMU are paid, the UK government/taxpayer covers a good proportion of the healthcare costs whereas under CMU affiliation the UK government pays nothing. Indeed it it is the general policy of the CPAM to insist that the E Forms route is exhausted for this reason. This couple would have been in a much stronger position if they had made the E107 request immediately the E121 had been received. Now they are well and truly in the CMU swamp from where it will be difficult to be extricated but which they could probably have avoided.

Regards

Owen

pjowen@expathealthdirect.co.uk
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