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Applying for E106?


Keni

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Sorry if I have not read this thread correctly, and I am sure this has been covered before but if you have a 106 do you still have to pay to the French health service and/or have an insurance top up?

I am self employed (female) and the OH has worked so far for 33 years from the same company (how I don't know). We are trying to work out from this thread if I can get five years and can he be my dependant? Then would he get the five years as well?

Keni

Keni & Chris

 

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This is not a thread it is FAQs and should be locked, there is a a health section for enquiries below.

However assuming that this will be moved (hello mods[Www])  EDIT , It has Thanks

No 1 If you don't live or work in France you are not entitled to an E 106, you show a UK location in your name section.

You are confusing people who work in France and retired people, you only get  more than two years on an E 106 if you work in France. Now you know this you can do a search or have a look in the Health section about E 106 entitlements there are loads of threads about all sorts of E 106s and 121s, but to answer your points briefly,

.................and I am sure this has been covered before but if you have an E106 do you still have to pay to the French health service NO and/or have an insurance top up    YES but not compulsory

I am self employed (female) and the OH has worked so far for 33 years from the same company (how I don't know). We are trying to work out from this thread if I can get five years  NO  it is two years maximum if you retire to France, provided that one of you has paid NI for the last three years

Can he be my dependant? Yes but not to get five years.

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1) are you permanent residents in France

2) you are self employed, but where are you working? If you work from France then you should be registered in France and paying into the system, donc you don't need an E106, ask if your husband can be noted as a dependant.

3) If you go to the UK to work and pay contributions there, then check with Newcastle and see what E forms are appropriate for you both and see if your husband is not working now, if he can be classed as a dependant.

4) E form or paying directly into the french system, then I would recommend that you take out top up health insurance.

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Hang on a minute, When I had an E106 I did not have to pay into the French health system. I had to pay my proportion of the perscription costs, but not into the system.

I don't have top up cover, it is not compulory and I can't afford it so why should I have it.

My E106 lasted for 2 years and now I am fully integrated into the system, but nothing has changed, I still don't need to pay any extra in as I don't earn enough from my RAF pension. I am not old enough to get a state pension yet.

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Sorry if i have caused confusion the reason I originally asked the question is because here in the Uk I am self-employed, but hubby is thinking along the lines of an early retirement. At that point we will retire (?) to France permanently, health and powers that be, willing. So I was asking about the E106 along the lines of yes, I would be permanent in France, having been self employed in the Uk. Hubby and I would be in our 50's and we are simply trying to do our homework first.

Sorry if I have got you all stroppy, but I only asked what I thought was a simple question.

Keni

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Keni

Stroppy?  Me??[:D]

 The answer to your queries are in my post.  What you do in the UK is only relevant to the payment of NI contributions and if you are retiring to France the most health cover you will get under an E 106 is two years.,  After that you pay into the French system based on your income. There are also a lot of threads about applying for an E 106 etc on here and how the top up insurance system works.  I have no idea what the posts at the bottom, one poster definitely has misread the other posts.

You should also be aware that there is a growing anger in France about "asset rich" but "income poor" people both French and ex pats who do not have to pay anything for their healthcare due to being on small pensions whilst sitting on a large pile of cash or properties whilst living in a restored chateau with new cars and 4 x 4s parked round the Olympic size swimming pool.  Well that is how the French press see the situation, unfortunately you cannot make voluntary contributions to the French health care system so until the rules are changed to take into account of assets or to reintroduce a means test for residency in France that situation will continue.

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Keni

When you move across to France, you will have retired, therefore you will be classed as "living but not working".  This will entitle you both to an form E106 which will last for up to two years dependent on your previous NI payment histories.  Prior to your move, you should contact the Pension Service at Tyneview Park, Newcastle and apply for the forms.   

When you arrive in France, you'll need to register for state healthcare insurance with your local caisse primaire d'assurance maladie (CPAM) and provide them with the E106s, birth and marriage certificates, proof of identity and address and a bank RIB.  You will then receive an attestation which sets out the terms and duration of your insurance cover.

Your CPAM will reimburse you around 70% of your treatment costs, so you'll need to purchase a top-up policy (usually referred to as a mutuelle or complimentaire) to cover the shortfall.

Whilst your E106s are current, you are not required to make any contribution to the state healthcare scheme.  However, once they have expired, you will have to re-register with your CPAM and start paying your own contributions.  These are currently calculated on the basis of 8% of your joint taxable income less allowances, over an 7,083 euro threshold.

 

 

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